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April 04, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-04

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O~NE I

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re ii~r~n

I atlx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
D)AY ANDJNiIHT WtH
SERVICE

No. 135.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 1920.

PRICE THREE +

P:a~RICEaTlii.. L
f= .::

4(RT H WESTERN

ANNEXES

TITL

9S ROUTED FROM
iISBER;RUH ART
I EBERT TROOPS.
[UNISTS INTEND TO DESTRY
ALL RUHR VALLEY IN-
DUSTRIES
RKERS THREATEN TO
EW GENER AL STRIKE
can Leaders Declare Present
ull Is Only Breathing Spell;
More Trouble Later
(B? Associated Press)
lenz, April 3.-The Reichswehr
captured Duisberg and Ruhrort
bis afternoon, after much street
g according to advices received

THIRD TEAM PICKEDI
FROM STAR H. S. LADS
1 embers of the third all-
tournament team, and those giv-
en honorable mention by the
Michigan coaches are :
! Third Team
" Kirker, R.F., Detroit Northern.
Vowles, L.F., Muskegon.
Christianson, C., Escanaba.
Siith, R.G., Det. Northern. '
!Roh, LG., Lansing.
Honorable Mentions
Baer, C., Pontiac.
Carty, F., Detroit Northwestern.
Irving, G., Holland.-
Gregory, F., Ann Arbor.
Furguson, C., Flint.
Dembenski, F., Arthur Hill.
Johnson, C., Lansing.
Brower, F., Adrian.
UON DIN, 1R ECTO RS
EXPELSTUIDENTS,
Two, Engineers Fall Victims to Own
"Conduct Unbecoming Gentlemen;"
SAnother to be Tried

WINS TOURNAMENT
FROM NORTHERN,
DERIB 17-13

I

WEALTH OF
MAKE

MATERIAL
ES CHOICE HARD

STATE HONORS PRACTICALLY DE-
CIDED BY FOUL SHOOT-
ING
MATHER AND MITCHELL
PICK MYTHICAL F I V E S
Weed, Ann Arbor, Given Berth on
Squad; Kirker, Northern, Shoots
24 of 31 Free Throws

A Cologne dispatch says that in
Duisberg the Reds fought individual--
ly, firing from windows and house-
tops. Some machine gun and artil-
lery fire could be heard in Cologne
over the telephone the dispatch adds.
Paris, April 3.- A dispatch from
Muelheim this afternoon said that
the Communists had announced they
would destroy all of the industries
in the Ruhr district at 4 o'clock this
afternoon if German government
troops did Clot halt their advance.
May Renew Strike
London, .April 3. - The executiv~i
council of the Ruhr workers in call-
ing off their geneal strike, threat-
ened to renew it if the German gov-
ernment failed to fulfill its agree-
ment, especially the promise to halt
the Reichswahr, said a news agency
dispatch from Copenhagen today,
quoting advices received there from
Essen.1
German government troops, how-
ever, are marching into the Ruhr dis-
- trict, despite the agreement between
the cabinet and the workers, said an
Essen dispatch to The Daily today.
Another Outbreak Feared'
Berlin, April 3.-Although Herr Sev-
ering, the government emissary, has
entered into an agreement with the
armed workers in -the Ruhr district,
doubt was expressed today if the
leaders can control their followers or
make all clauses of the agreement
effective.
Some of the Spartacist chiefs say
that this is only a breathing spell and
predict another outbreak later.
Workers are reluctant to give up
their arms in Westphalia, although
that was one of the terms the gov-
ernment insisted upon. A workmen's
(See Number 4, Page Six)
DUTCH PROFESSOR -
TO LECTURE HEREt
Dr. A. J. Barnouw of Leyden Univer-;
sity to Speak on Social Problem t

DENIED USE OF BUILDING
FOR SIX MONTHS TO YEAR
Carlos Burt, '22E, and E. J. Mesner,
'21E, were, yesterday, expelled from
membership in the Michigan Union,
the first for a period of one year, and
the second until Nov. 1.
This action was taken by the board
of directors of the Union at their reg-
ular- monthly meeting, following
charges of "conduct unbecoming a
gentleman," placed against the two"
students.
Committee Asks Expulsion
The action was .requested by the
house committee of the Union, com-
posed of Waldo McKee, '20E, Angus
Goetz, '22M, Carl Johnson, '20, Marry
Carey, '20,1Bruce Millar, '20, H. G.
Watkins, '12, Harry Potter, '07, and
Prof. H. E./Riggs. The men were giv-
en the customary hearing before the
recommendation was made.
Carl Hogan, '20E, president of the
Union, .speaking of the men expelled,
said, "Any man who would come here
and 'teliberately destroy Union prop-
erty, which so many sacrificed for 15
years to obtain, has no place in a Un-
iversity of men and will not be toler-
ated in the membership of the Union.
"The men in this case are excep-
tionally lucky in their light punish-
ment."
Will Try Another
One otherman is to be tried on the
same charge for which these men
where suspended, that of conduct un-
becoming a"gentleman, in this case
being mutilation.-of Union property.
His case is expected to come before the
house committee soon.
The directors at this meeting, also
took action regarding the interpreta-
tion of house rule number 19, regard-
ing the granting of admission cards
to "the members of the family of ar
member of the Union."' The rule will
now be construed to mean "members
living under the same roof as the mem-+
ber applying."

Powerful defensive playing, and
steady scoring made Detroit North-
western state high school basketball
champions, winning last night in the
finals of the University of Michigan
tournament from Detroit Northern, 17
to 13.
Carty, Northwestern forward, was
the scoring star of the game, making
11 points, and in addition, playing a
fast game on the floor. The Spring-
teen-Smokeweiz guarding combination
was the best reason for the low score
of the Northern team, the two men
stopping the rushes of McWood and
Allen, which have been responsible
for high scoring of the Eskimo quintet
during other games of the meet.
Carty Scores First
Carty was the first scorer of the eve-
ning, dropping four points from the
foul line, followed by a field basket
by Vreeland. Kirker; captain of the
defeated team opend the point making
for Northern at the end of seven min-
utes, counting twice by the foul meth-
od.- Two sensational basket throws
by Vreeland brought the Colt score to
nine, the total for the period.
Kirker was the only member of the
Noirthern team able to gcore in the in-
itial half, making the Ntrthern total of
seven points with one basket from the
field, and five from the short line. The
defensive play in this half is shown
by the fact that only three baskets
were made from the field, all of those
being long shots. Both teams gua'rded
well under the basket.
- Play in the second half was faster,
with Carty again leading the scoring.
Smith the big Northern stationary)
guard, prevented shooting under 'the
basket,# and Northwestern was good
for three long shots from the floor.
The entrance of Monihan, for North-
ern, one of the fastest men seen in the
tournament speeded up the play to a
considerable degree.
Try to Break Lead
Allen and Monihan rushed the ball
to the Northern end of the floor time
after time, in an effort to overcome
the two point lead of the Colts, but
the big Northwestern guards were able
to secure the ball, and play it out of
danger. The Northern tip-off combin-
ation, effective against other teams in
the meet, was good for only one basket,
that coming in the second half, thrown
by McWood.
Though honors were even to a great
degree, the Northwestern team merited
the win. Ability to stop the North-
ern formations by superior weight,
and better basket shooting were the
deciding factors of the game.
(See Number 1, Page Six)

Coaches Mather and Mitchell
of Michigan, selected the follow-
ing players as members of the
first and second all-tournament
quintets.
First Team
Weed, R. F., Ann Arbor.
McWood, L.F., Detroit Northern.
Smokeweiz, C, Det. N. W.
Springsteen, L.G., Det. N. W.
H. Kipke, Capt., .R.G., Lansing.
Second TeamJ
Allen, R.F., Detroit Northern.
Richards, L.F., Lansing.
C. Bassett, C., Adrian.
Kvitky, R.G., Cass Tech.
Vreeland, L.G., Detroit N. W.
A wealth of material made the
choices exceedingly difficult.
WOMIEN PRESEN'T
PRESIDENT 'GIFT
Silver Pitcher Presented to Retiring
Head of University at Annual
Luncheon
DISCUSS PROBABILITY OF
WOMEN'S LEAGUE BUILDING

"GOREDID IT." 1920 UNIONl OPERA
READY TO BE PRESENTED TO PUBLIC
AFTER 2PIA RS RHEAR9SAL

Combined Opera
And Hop Number
Gargoyle's Next
Full of "pep"' and ginger from cov-
er to cover, the next number of the
Gargoyle will be offered to the cam-'
pus this coming Wednesday. The main
features of this issue will be the nu-
merous articles on the J-Hop and
Union opera, which appear in great
variety and uniqueness.
A complete review and burlesque on
the opera termed "George Done It" is
well calculated to rival the original
production. Popular lines of the Union
version have been turned around,
twisted, and otherwise reconstructed
to suit the fancy of the scrutinizing'
Gargoyle e4itors, who offer their work
to the students as a high class bur-
lesque possibility.
This, feature number of the Gar-
goyle is declared to be the best of the
year, containing not only a larger
amount of written contributions but
also a greater wealth of artistic ma-
terial. The cover design by Reed
Bachman is done in three colors. Three
full page drawings by Gower, Boyd,
and Griffith, and a double page illus-
tration by Hubach give to tLe issue
plenty of art.
An inno'vation will be forthcoming
in the shoat stories which are inter-
spersed with the regular order of con-
tents. 1rhe number will be the larg-
est of the year, containing eight more
pages than any previous one.
,,
DETROIT ALMNI PLAN
BIG MICHIGAN WEEK

(By Marguerite Clark and
Carol McDonald) ~
Sadness and gladness reigned to-
gether at the Women's Annual lunch-
eon held yesterday for 600 women in
B'arbour gymnasium,-sadness because
it was the last of these functions at
which President Harry B. Hutchins
would partake in an official capacity,
and gladness because that is ever
present when University of Michigan
women are assembled.
The toastmistress was Sue Verlen-
den, '20, and the speakers in their or-
der were President Hutchins, '71,
Hon. James 0. Murfin, '95, and Mar-
guerite Chapin, '20.
President Addresses Women
The ascendancy of women to the
educational and political sphere they
now hold was the topic of President
I Hutchins' remarks. The importance.
of women of the past in every walk
of life was but as a veneer compared
with their function today, he declar-
ed. "You are on trial and will be on
trial for some time to come for wom-
en have been given higher education
for only one generation and they are
still proving themselves.""
An address by Regent Murfin -was
a tribute to President Hutchins, who,
he said, is known as one of the fore-
most educators in America today. He
spoke then at length about the teach-
ing profession, mentioning the need
for higher salaries.
"You cannot pay educators a mere
pittance and expect results commen-
surate with the calibre of the profes-
sion," he stated :"Thereais nothing
that so molds character as teaching
and the environment of teaching. A
good character is the ambition of
veryone and the atmosphere, influence,
and environment of educators mold a
good character more than anything
else."

CAST AND CHORUS WORK fro PER.
FECTION WITH STAGE
SETTINGS .
DIRECTOR SATISFIED;
TEST TO COME MONDAY
Scenery and Lighting Effects Prove
Satisfactory; "Rough Spots"
Worked Out of Men
Two rehearsals Saturday prepared
the fourteenth annual Union opera,
"George Did It," for the first per-
formance Monday night in a series of
six which will be given this week at
the Whitney theater. Director Suter
drilled his company all Saturday aft-
ernoon and late into the night in a
successful attempt to eliminate all
rough spots in production and to per-
Pect the acting.
After long hours of rehearsal In'
conjunction with the orchestra and
with all stage properties and lighting
effects, Mr. Shuter pronounced "George
Did it" as ready for the first per-
fbrmance. Monday -night's show will
be just as good as the last one, he
stated.
Few Seats Remain
A few good seats still remain for all
performances, particularly for Monday
night, despite the fact that more tick-
ets have been sold this year than ever
before. The student body and gen-
eral public can obtain the remaining
tickets at the Whitney theater box
office any time Monday.
Everything is in readiness for the
entrance of the orchestra into the pit,
the playing of the preliminary mu-
sic, and the raising of the curtain for
the prologue of the 1920 Union olera,.
which two months of constant work
has prepared for production. -
,Drilling the members of the opera
cast and chorus in their respective
parts time and time again until every
minor defect was cut out, Director
Shuter finally dismissed them late Sat-
urday night after final instructions
had been given.
Twice the opera was rehearsed from
start to finish through the prologue,
first act, interlude, and seconi act, and
particular parts were run through
many times. Familiarity of .the com-
pany with the setting and scenery was
effected, and the electricians manipu-
lated their apparatus in unison.
Accustomed to Play
Despite a few tight fits, most of the
men have managed to get into their
costumes in good shape, and they all
went through the rehearsals without
demanding rest. For some time the
dancers have been using their regular
slippers, in order that sore feet might
not come after the first performance.
During the entire past week the or-
chestra has been playing the accom-
paniments to the songs aid dances.
Earl V. Moore, musical director, stat-
ed that the orchestra was in better
shape the middle of last week than
previous orchestras have been on the
first night, due to ate arrival,of the
musical scores.
Properties and scenery have been
transported tothe theater from the
Union,. and were used for Friday's
and Saturday's drills. The actors have
shown considerable ease in the new
(Seoe Number 3, Page Six)
LIGHTED CIGARETTE FIRES
LUMBER PILE NEAR UNION

FINAL . ARRANGEMENTS TO
COMPLETED AT DETROIT
TODAY

BE

Plans, speakers, events, and places
for Detroit's Michigan week will be
finally decided upon at a meeting in
that city tomorrow of the committee
of the University of Michigan club.
Starting Friday evening, April 16,
with a farewell dinner to President
Harry B. Hutchins, the alnmni are
planning an unprecedented series of
events and Saturday, April 24, will be
the biggest Michigan Day ever held
in Detroit. Among the other events
will be the performance of tie Union
opera, "George Did It," on Saturday,
April 17, followed by an after-theater
supper qnd dance at the Hotel Stat-
ler.
A large block of seats has been re-
servedĀ° for the Chicago- Detroit base-,
ball game on Michigan Day and that
evening the Varsity band will give a
concert in Orchestra hall. Vaudeville,
singing, and stunts will supplant the
efforts of the band in making the affair
the best of its kind.
Not only Michigan students and
alumni will have a hand in Michigan
week but it is planned that many peo-
ple from other instjutions will be
present at all the functions. At to-
morrow's meeting the committee ex-
pects to complete all plans for enter-
taining the men of the opera and band
while they are in.-the city.
BROTHER-IN-LAW OF PRESIDENT
HUTCHINS DIES IN SCOTLAND

Dr. A. J. Barnouw of the Un:versity
of Leyden, Holland, will lecture in
English on "Social Life in Holland,"
at 4:15 o'clock Wednesday afternoon,
April 7, in the Natural Science audi-
torium.
This University lecture, which is
free to the public, is given in response
to an official invitation by the Uni-
versity. Prof. John G. Winters of the
department of Greek says, "Dr. Bar-
nouw speaks and writes English with
remarkable - facility. and his lecture
here should prove to be one of un-
usual interest."
Dr. *rnouw. is a scholar of dis-
tinction-"in the field of Dutch politics
and history. During the present year,
'he is Queen Wilhelmina's exchange
professor at Columbia university,
where his lectures have attracted
much attention. His name is famil-
iar as a contributor for many years to
the Nation and when the Review was
founded he became an associate editor
of that journal. Dr. Barnouw is also
lecturing at the universities of Chi-
cago and Wisconsin before he ap-
--- --_

Earn Way Through School Flying
Airplane; Latest Approved Jtethod

Waiting table, being a handy man,
and dispensing soda have all gone by
the boards when it comes to earning
your way through school. .
There is a new method-a twentieth
century method that's got this beat a
mile. If you don't believe it, try it.
It's a make or break propostion any-
way you figure it. You're bound to go
up, yet you're sure to come down.
The newest method is flying.
Three students on the Michigan cam-
pus, all licensed pilots were inspired,
decided and are going to try the ven-
ture. They're going to work their
way through school in an airplane.
O. J. Hall, '23E, president of the
Aero club, W. H. Morrow, ex-'17,
special student, and'TW. J. Burns, '22,1

are the three former flyers who are
going to try the venture.
Hall, who has had more than 500
hours in the air is the star of the trio.
He earned his fame when he carried
King Albert of Belgium over the Ger-
man lines during the war to show the
king how the 'big fight looked from
the air.
The three students have secured' an
airplane which they expect wiUl arrive
in Ann Arbor by Wednesday. They
will sell flights to those who would
try the sensation of gliding through the
air and will also stage a number of
advertising stunts.
Arrangements are under way to
bring one of the guests of the J-Hop
to Ann Arbor from her home town,
via the air route.

Honor University Head
Two unusual features of the lunch-
eon this year were the presenfation
of a solid silver pitcher to Presi-
dent Hutchins by Marguerite Chapin,
the pitcher being the gift of the wom-
en of Michigan; and the receipt by
each woman plesent of an autographed
photograph of President Hutchins.
The general chairman of the lunch-
eon was Marion Treadgold, '20, to
whom should be given the greater
share of the credit for its s access.,
Following the luncheon a Michigan
Women's rally was held in Sarah Cas-
wel Angell hall. Mrs. Kathryn P.
Pomeroy was in charge of the meet-
ing. She stated that there are 5,086
members of the Alumnae association
now and that their first work as a
body is expressed in Alumnae resi-
dence, and the work which they wish
to soon begin.is the finding 'of money
to erect a women's building which will
(See Number 2, Page Six)

Rufus Fleming, '73, brother-in-law
of President Hutchins, is, dead in Ed-
inborough, Scotland, following three
months' sickness, according to a cable-
gram received by the president last
night.
Since 1897 he has been United States
consul at Edinborough. The other bur-
dened war conditions were declare'd to
be the probable cause of his illness.

Fire destroyed a small quantity of
lumber in the rear of the Union late
Saturday afternoon. The fire was
probably caused by a lighted cigarette
thrown"' from the balcony above. A
hose brought from inside the build-
ing checked the blaze. Fire depart-
ment chemicals completed the task.
THE WEATHER o
Probable Snow in South and Central
Portions, Strong West Winds Shifting
to Northeast.

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