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April 03, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-03

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TODAX

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DAY AND N1IGHT h
SERVICE

XXX. No. 134.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 1920.

PRICE THREE

DAVENPORT
KS AT FINAL
ilON OFM.AUSS

[GAN ACADEMY OF
D SCHOOLMASTERS
JOINT [EETING

SCIENCE
HOLD

DISCUSSION CONCERNS
FARMING DIFFICULTIES
"The New Day in Agriculture" Forms
Dean's Topic;.Tells of Stages
of Agrieniture
Meeting jointly with the School-
masters' club, the 25th annual meet-
ing of the Michigan Academy of Sci-
ence was concluded Friday evening'
in the Natural Science auditorium.
"We are rapidly becoming on lndup-
trial country and agriculture is suf-
fering, due to the high prices paid to
unskilled labor," stated Dean Eugene
Davenport, of the University of Illi-
nois,- speaking on "The New Day in
American Agriculture." "That is to
say," he continued, "a great nation
with sufficient land is becoming de-
pendent upon others for its food sup-
ply.
Land Prices Rise
"Many remember when the best
lands of the state were available at
$1 per acre. Prairies listed as worth-
less passed at 50 cents per 'ere. Now,
these same lands are selling at from
$600yto $600 per acre. People .for-
merly went on to farmsa to get a home
and not primarily to make money.
They were afraid of but two things-
the poorhouse and the devil.
"The next stage was when the peo-
ple went to the farms to obtain land.
The present stage is one in which the
farmer must realize proft-he must
run it as a money-making proposition
and not merely to provide himself
with a home. More labor is one press-
ing necessity."
Farmer Competes with World
Dean Davenport went on to say that
American farms have produced more
per man than those of any other coun-
try. "Few people realize that the art
of passing the high wages on to the
consumer is not available to the farm-
er who must compete with the world
market."
Concluding his lecture, he issued a
warning against the public ownership
of land as a solution of the present
situation.
"ROSALIND" PRESENTED AT
COMEDY CLUB SPRING PARTY

PEACE RESOLUTION
MAY PASS SENATE
(By Associated' Press)
Washington, April .2. - Prompt
adoption by the senate of the 'house
resolution declaring the state of war
with Germany at an end is expected
by Itepublican leaders. They had a
conference today to discuss future
igislation at thissession, and Senator
Lodge of Massachusetts said later
that he did not anticipate any great
delay in the senate.
Mr. Lodge said the whole contro-
versy "had been threshed out pret-
ty thoroughly," and that he believed
the house resolution would be adopt-
ed probably with the united Republi-
can support and general opposition
by the Democrats.
The leaders decided at the confer-
ence that army reorganization legis-
lation would be the next measure tak-
en up by the senate. It will be fol-
lowed by the house bill to increase
dye stuff tariffs.
POLICE, EXPECT ARREST
OF CHEMICAL THROWER
CONFIDENT ,THAT. CULPRIT WILL
BE APPREHENDED
SOON
Police yesterday declared that they
were confident that an arrest would
be made within the next few hours
in connection with the misdemeandr
committed Tuesday night at the Pack-
ard dance hall.
The perpetrator of the crime which
resulted in severe injuries being sus-
tained by Thomas Neff, high school
student, after being hit by a test tube
containing some vile smelling chemi-
cals thrown by some unknown per-
son, will be prosecuted to the full ex-
tent of the law, police declare.
Managers of the dance hall say that
the act was committed by a person
who was'some time ago ejected from
the hall when his presence became
obnoxious.
The test tube which contained the
chemicals was hurled through the
window of the hall during the prog-
ress of a dance, and struck Neff above
the eye, burning him severely and al-
so injuring his partner.
Police declare that they have suc-
ceeded in gaining sufficient evidence
on the man they have held under sus-
picion to make an arrest sometime.
today.
Make Cut in National Debt In March
Washington, April 2.-A reduction
of $705,660,000 in the national debt
more than double the amount by
which the debt was lowered during
any previous month, was accom-
plished during March, the treasury
reported tonight. The national debt
now stands at $24,698,000,000.
Officials said that this record could
not be used for forecasting further
monthly reductions. They regarded it
"as sound evidence" of the success of
the treasury program for financing
the post-war period.

4 TEAMS LEFT IN
BASKETBALL RACE
Ann Arbor, Detroit Northern, Lans-
ing and Detroit Northwestern
Advance to Semi-Finals
TWO GAMES THIS MORNING;
TITLE CONTEST THIS EVENING
Ann Arbor, 'Detroit Northern, Lans-
ing, and Detroit Northwestern are the
four teams remaining in the state in-
terscholastic basketball championship
race as a result of the games played
yesterday afternoon and evening.

Little information could be gained
from leaders of any political clubs on
the campus in regards to the results
of the straw vote held Thursday. The
Hooverites only were willing to say"
anything in connection with the bal-
lot. They held it to be an indication
of the national feeling.
Nationally, yesterday saw the
Hoover boom spread into a full grown
fight for the Republican nomination,
according to reports from various
parts of the country. The New York
World, which paper is credited with
initiating the campaign boosting
WILL COST $69500

Political Clubs Say Little On
ilallot Results; Candidates lusy

TODAY'S GAMES

Morning
9:30-Ann Arbor vs.
Northern,"
10:30 - Lansing vs.
Northwestern.
Evening
7:30 - Winners of

Detroit
Detroit

morning

games play for championship.

New Electrical Apparatus, Elaborate
Costumes, and Scenery Raise
Expense, '^
HOLD FULL DRESS REHEARSAL
TONIGHT AT WHITNE Y THEATER
Addition of elaborate and com-
plete equipment to the properties of7
"George Did It," and expense of un-
usual scenic affects and costumes hasa
increased by $2,000 the budget,_
which was granted E. Mortimer Shut-
er for the production of this year's
opera, as compared with the ex-
pense of "Come On Dad."
A total of $6,500 was given the di-

Hoover for the presidency, although
originally placing him on the Demo-
cratic slate, has not withdrawn their
support as the result of his announce-
ment that he would accept the Repub-
lican nomination if it were tendered
him.
Wood Touring Illinois
Wood at present is touring Illi-
nois. However, the fact that Illinois
has a. candidate itselIf in the person
of its governor, Lowden, in the field,
makes the Illinois campaign an ex-
ceptionally difficult one.
The interesting angle in connec-
tion with the Republican race in Cal-
ifornia presents a new situation with
two candidates from one state run-e
ning on the same party ticket. An un-
writtenhlaw of politicsirequiressthe
man who 'is beaten in his own state,
to withdraw from the race. There-
fore, if Hoover should draw the Cali-
fornia vote, Johnson will probably
withdraw from the race. However, if
Johnson draws the home state's sup-
port, the rule will probably not hold
true, for Hoover as demonstrated by
his change of party affiliations, does
not respect political traditin.
Interest in Michigan Primaries
.T'he eyes of the entire country, it
is expected, will be focused upon
Michigan during the early part of the
coming week. Monday has been set
as the date for the Michigan primar-
ies. It is expected that this will be
the first real test of the s anding
of Republican candidates. Hoover's
name in this state appears ors both
Republican and Democratic tickets.
INDICATIONS POINT TO.
HEAVY VOTING MONOAY1

These schools will compete against
each other in the semi-finals Xthis
morningtand the winners of these two
contests will fight for the title this
evening. It is expected that the three
games today will furnish the fastest
court exhibitions of the tournament.
There is little to choose between the
four aggregations, all of them having
shown the fastest kind of basketball
in their early round games.
Ann Arbor Downs Pontiac
Ann Arbor advanced to the semi-
final round by defeating Pontiac in
the hardest fought game of the day,
13 to 11. Weed, the local center, star-
red for the winners with two field
baskets and five in seven from the
foul line.
Baer did stellar work for Pontiac,
making six of his team's 11 points.
The local five led at half time, 9 to
5, but the Pontiac' quintet came back
in the second half and outscored the
winners.
Ann Arbor Position Pontiac
Gregory. ....L.F.... Watchpocket
Yutzy.........R.F......McCallum
Weed.....C..........Baer
Baylis ........L.G......B.Boardman
McGregor ...... R.G......... ....Bird
'Baskets-Gregory 2, Weed 2, Watch-
pocket 1, Baer 3. Fouls-Weed 5 in 7,
Watchpocket 3.in 9.
Escanaba Outplayed
In the final game of the day the
strong Detroit Northern five outplayed
the Escanaba quintet, scoring a 26 to
8 victory. The fast floor work and
accurate shooting of Mallender, Allen,
and Kirker were too much for the
Upper, Peninsula team. Smith, also
of the victors, played a fine defensive
game at standing guard.
After the substitution of Kirker and
McWood in the closing stages of the
contest, the Detroiters seemed to score
almost at will. The losers had many
shots at the basket, especially in the
(Continued on Page Six)

Presentation of J. M. Barrie's
"Rosalind," followed by dancing in
Barbour gymnasium featured the
program of the Comedy club's spring
party held last night.
"Rosalind," a one act play, nri-ed
a delightful little bit of characteriza-
tion with Richard Forsythe, '20, in the
lead, supported by Harriet Wood-
worth, '20, as Rosalind. Alice Com-
fort, '21, played the part of the elderly
lady of the cast.
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, of the en-
gineering English department, and
Mrs. Nelson chaperoned the affair.
Music was furnished for dancing by
Rhodes orchestra.
UNION DIRECTORS TO HOLD
BOARD1 MEETING TODAY AT 11
The Union board of directors will
hold its regular meeting at 11 o'clock
today, inasmuch as the regular date
for meeting falls during spring vaca-

rector to round the opera into shape,
compared to $4,500 of last year. The
largest single expenditure was for a
complete set of electrical apparatus,
designed to better the lighting effects
of certain dancing acts and also the
entire show.
$800 for Spotghfti
This set cost $800 and contains
some of the latest devices in stage
lighting. Five powerful spotlights,
for use back of stage- and on stage,
were purchased, and they enable un-
usually brilliant and many colored
lighting effects. , Considerable ex-
pense was involved in the procur-
ing of the novel costumes and unus-
ual scenery for the production.
$12,500 for Road Trip
In addition to the $6,500 expense
necessary for local performances, the
trip will require an output of about
$12,500.
Rough spots in the acting and danc-
ing of the cast and chorus were iron-
ed out in the' first rehearsal last
night at the Whitney. When Director
Shuter discovered a minor fault of
any member of the company, he de-
manded the repetition of the act until
there was no more trouble with that
particular part.
Rehearsals Today
Further drills this afternoon and
night, the evening rehearsal being a
full dress one, are expected to elim-
inate any remaining faults. The .sym-
phony orchestra accompanied the
cast and chorus in their songs and
dances for the early part of the
evening, and they succeeded in get-
ting together exceptionally well.
"Everything will be in readiness
for the opening Monday night and the
first performance of "George Did It"
will be just as good as the last one,"
stated E. Mortimer Shuter, the direct-
or, "in fact it ought to be better as the
costumes and wigs are fresh and the
men full of pep.
Heavy demand has marked the sale
of tickets, since they were placed at
the disposal of the general public at
the Whitney this week. A few good
seats still remain unsold for any of
the six performances of next week.
CERCLE FRANCAIS CONTEST.
CLOSES ON MONDAY EVENING
All essays in the prize essay con-
test under the auspices of tie Cercle
Francais must be in by 6 o'clock Mon-
day evening, April 5. A box has been
provided in the corridor of the south
wing for the essays.
The essays are to be 2,000 words
long.' They must be signed by a
"nom de plume" and accompanied
by an envelope bearing the "nom de
plume" and containing the name of the
writer. The ,essays must be typewrit-
ten.
If no essays of sufficient merit are
turned in,; the committee withholds the
prize of $50 for the best essay.

ANN

Ann Arbor's choice of
candidates will be made

presidential
Monday at

RARE PERSONALITY EXHIBITED IN

ARBOR TO CONSIDER CHAR-
TER REVISION; LARGE
REGISTRATION-

"MONNA

VANN A"

INTERPRETATIONS

the primary election. Indications
point toward a large vote as there has
'seen much activity in the line of cam-
paigning this year -and a heavy reg-
istration was received last Wednes-
day. More than 1,000 voters regis-
tered and it is estimated that at least
500 of these are new Ann Arbor cit-
izens.
In addition to the. presidential nom-
inations, national committeemen for
the different parties will be named,
the county and city will pass on
bonding propositions, the city will
elect aldermen and constables and the
matter of revising the city's charter
will be considered. The voters will
decide whether or not to revise the
charter and will also name the com-
mittee to do this work in case the
change is favored.
This charter committee will be un-
instructed and so will have complete
power to make such recommendations
as it may see fit. The acceptance of.
the revision proposition does not nec-
essarily indicate that a commission
government will result as the commit-
tee may merely make some alterations
in the presentcouncil system in the.
charter it returns to the council.
PLAN TO ORGANIZE CHAPER
OF STATE SPANISH TEACHERS
First steps toward organization of
of a Michigan chapter of the associa-
tion of teachers of Spanish were ef-
fected Thursday at a luncheon held
by those among the Schoolmasters'
club interested in romance languages.
The Spanish teachers' club of De-
troit was instructed to draw up a
statement indicating the wish that a
chapter of the national association
be established. It is understood that
there is a l'oosely-connected, inform-
al type of organization on the cam-
pus among faculty members of the
Spanish department. This would be
absorbed by the proposed chapter, ac-
cording to a plan suggested.
Eddy to. Attend Craftsman Meeting
Charles B. Eddy, grand master of
the state of Michigan, will be pres-
ent at a meeting of the Craftsman
club to be held at 7:30 tonight at the
Masonic temple.
The third 'degree will be confered
at that time and the officers are anxi-
ous that there shall be a large at-
tendance. After the meeting, refresh-
ments will be served.

TROUBE IN RUHR
REGION COMES TI
GENERAL STRIKE CALLED 0
IN MORNING; MEN TO RE.
SUME WORK -
WORKMEN LEADERS D
NOT EXPECT TROUBI
Virtually All Arms Deposited in B
racks and Other Buildings of
Dusseldorf
(By Associated Press)
Dusseldorf, April 2.-Control by
workmen ceased theoretically at n
today throughout the Ruhr region
der the peace terms ratified last ni
at Essen. Today being Good Frid
religious ceremonies were observ
The general strike was called
this morning and resumption of w
will take place tomorrow. Str
cars, however, were operating in m
places today. The workmen lead
are satisfied that there will be no gr
difficulty in executing the agreem
virtually all arms in Dusseldorf be
already deposited in the barracks- a
other buildings.
The moderates are confident t
cooler council will prevail
WILL DISPATCH TROOPS
Berlin, April 2.-The German g
ernment announces, in a communi
tion .to the press that it has resol
to dispatch troops to the Ruhr
gion as soon as the Entente conse
to such a move. The decision V
reached after a three hour cabi
meeting today.
Vienna, April 2.-The Russian s
iets through a Victor Kapp so
representative in Berlin formally
fered to Bela Kun and other comm
ists safe conduct through Germany
Russia, it is alleged. On their arri
in Russia they were promised shel
AMERICANS RELEASED
Washington, April 2.--Release of
American Red Cross workers now h
prisoners in Siberia by the Bolshe
with the exception of Alexander
Tweedie of New York was repor
today to the national headquart
The last report from Tweedie said
was ill with typhus at Trasnoyarsl
All the other captives said they s
fered no harm while in the' hands
the Bolsheviki.
BAND BOUNCE ONE1O
MICIGINWEEK EVEN'
4-
A Band Bounce to be presented
the Varsity band on April 24 at
chestra hall will complete the celeb
tion of Michigan Week in Detr
The -celebration starts the evening
April 16 with a farewell dinner
President Harry B. Hutchins.
purpose of Mic1igan Week is to int
est people of-Detroit in the Univ
sity.
Several events are being plamn
for the week. April 24 is intercoll
late day and a full program has b
completed; a luncheon at the Stal
Hotel with the Chicago and Det

ball teams as guests will start
program, "Hughie' Jennings, ma
ager of the Tigers will act as toa
master and following the luncheon:
entire body will march to the b
park headed by the band.
Following the game there will
a supper at the Board of Comme
building. "We expect 2,500 to atten
said Mr. Roscoe B. Huston, '04'L, "a
we want as many undergraduatesp
sent as possible. Tickets can bec
tained through Mr. John Watkt
Butler building, secretary of the Mi
igan club." Tickets.for the lunch
are $1.00, ball game 75 cents, Ba
Bounce 60 cents.
James S. Klumpp, '20M, stud
manager of the band, leaves for
troit today to make final arran
ments for the bounce. Singing
vaudeville stunts will be prese~ted
addition to the concert.
Plans are under way to present ':
Band Bounce in Ann 'Arbor -the ni
of April 23. The band is to meet

of the important matters to
up at this meeting will be the
in of punishment for the two
mvicted by the house commit-
destructive acts at the Union.
MERCHANTS OBSERVE
D FRIDAY; CLOSE 3 HOURS
Arbor merchants with few ex-
is closed their doors yesterday
2 to 3 o'clock in observance of
T'riday. Indications from other
show that the custom of clos-

(H. Hardy Heth) "
While Maeterlink's "Monna Vanna"
was not the happiest selection that
could have been made from the exten-
sive repertoire of readings of Hor-
tense Nielson who appeared in Uni-
veristy Hall yesterday afternoon, the
power of the reader herself was un-
mistakable. Giving a distinct rendi-
tion of every character-Guido, the
husband of Monna Vanna, Prinzivalle,
the heroine's old-time lover, and Mar
co, the father of Guido-keeping each
personality In an individual sphere of
interpretation, all this is no inconsid-
erable task. Miss Nielson handled the
intensely melodramatic theme with a
represion that was untiring.
A powerful voice combined with rare
personality are Miss Nielson's as-
sets. In her tensely emotional scenes
she subdued her voice to mere whis-
perings-a sign of remarkable art.
Her interpretations are works of
thought and suggestability.
"I form a current between my char-
acters," Miss Nielson would tell you.
"It is a sort of current of conscious-
ness. It is thought-a constant im-
aginary and visual relationship that

never must cease." She accredits her
knowledge of fundamentals and par-
ticularly breathing control to her pow-
er of voice. Dramatic action comes
from within, she says. a
Miss Nielson has been on the stage
ever since childhood. She has been
leading lady in "Mrs. Dane's De-
fense," by Henry Arthur Jones. And
she is particularly interested in stu-
dents who aspire for the stage as a
career, predicting that untold possi-
bilities await the man who' can under-
study the older actors of today..."Uni-
versity education does not develop
enugh of personality and potentiality.
The student seldom can ca-ordinate
what he learns with the needs of the
moment. Then, too, many students
follow lines of least resistance and.
do not assert individuality." One
great trouble with systems of learn-
ing is a lack of co-operation and un-
willingness to accept the new, accord-
ing to her.
"Education's a privilege," is her
philosophy. "But keep away from
people who may hurt your work, and
remember never to let jealousy en-
ter in."

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