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March 28, 1920 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-28

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a, VIRILE DRAMA at the,

Dunsany, Writer Who Invar
sssures Reader of Something
Leader of Neo-Romantic No

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A Special in
every sense
of the word

personally produced super-picture from his own studios brings to the screen one of the strongest stories
ever written

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By Stewart T. Beach
There is probably no other author
who has'identified himself more close-
ly with the movement which, holding
forth under varying titles, has be-
come most familiarly known as the
"neo-romantic," than has Lord Dun-
saby, self-styled professional soldier,,
but more particularly known as the
writer of tales and plays which are
something unique in the field of Iff -
erature.
One cannot pick up a work by this
genial Irishman without being imme-
diately struck with the fact that here
he is to find something different, and
that "different" touch is held until the
last. In characterizing his works as
unique, one cannot ut feel that he is
using a very small :word to describe
a style which, far'from having a par-
allel W any modern literature of our
own, harks back to the Arabian Nights,
or other tales and fancies wrought by
Oriental minds and handed down
through fable or legend almost from
the beginning of time.
Man with Imagination
-Edwin Bjorkman, in his introduction
to Dunsany's "Fifty-One Tales," has
rather poetically characterized him as
"a man with imagination as elfish as
moonlight mist," and after perusing
but a few of the bits of fanciful my-
thology which have come from his
pen, one canot but accept the spirit of
Mr. Bjorkman's words, for Lord Dun-
sany seems "to have created a my-
thology all his own." -**
One takes up a book and reads of
this person and that person, osten-
sibly characters in the mythology of
the Orient, and he instinctively be-
gins to fall into the , spirit of the
things, until, before he knows it, that
distinctively Eastern atmosphere has
made itself felt. He wonders what
may be the land from which these old
tales have come, and he fipds only
that they are of "the' edge of the
world," or from "lands of wonder'"
Then it is that he begins to realize
that they are tales of lands which have
existed only in the mind of the ian

who has so delightfully-presented them
to us, their author.
After serving throughout the war
with the Colstream Guards, Lord
Dunsany is turning his attention once
more to his writing, and almhough his
pen has never been absolutely idle,
we may expect that, inspired by his
life in the trenches, we shall soon be
favored by more of the fancifultales
which have made his name one to con-
jure with in the realm of artistic lit-
erature.
"Gods of itountain"
Among his plays, "The Gods Qf the
XIountain" probably stands in the
front rank, and, in fact, many have
claimed that Dunsany is seen at his
best in this story of the vengeance of
the gods. The plot is simple. It has
to do with nothing . ore than the
story of seven beggars who decide
that they shall impersonate the seven
green gods, who carved in stone sit
against the mountain side,
All goes well for a time. The popu-
lace shorn of its doubts by. messen-
gers who find that the gods have left
their seats against the mountain side,
worships them and gives them the
best of fare, but eventually, of course,
the beggars are punished, not by
earthly.beings, but #y the seven true
gods of the 'nountain, who appear,
casting the imposters into stone.
A simple plot, you say, without the
suggestion of a complex factor, and
it truth, it is, but Dunsany's whimsi-
cally fanciful style takes just such a
plot as this anjl weaves Into it a charm
which is irrisistable. . He is a great
master of. those short sentences in
dialogue for which Maeterlinck has
become' so noted, but contrary to the
rule of the latter that the speeches of
his characters shall sometimes be , so
short as to bewilder the reader as to
just wha{ meaning is hinted at. Dun-
sany's players, however short may be
their speeches, always give 'coherent
sentences, and the meaning is never
in 'doubt.

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SHUBERT,

DETROIT

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ARTHUR HOPKINS Pregents

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John Drew
In a Comedy by Rupert Hughes

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The

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With the N. Y. -istingulshe d Cast.

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