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March 27, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SSIBLY TURNING
NO W TODAY

r

&zi14

ASSOCIATEE
PRESS
1). Y AND NIGHT Wl
SERVICE

s

No. 128.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 27, 1920.

PRICE THREE Cl

BENTS

RAISE

YEARLY

TUITIOI

GENTS TO TAKE
V TRUST DEEDOF
MICHiGAN UNiON

OFFER EX-EMPEROR
HUNGARIAN THRONE
Geneva, March 26-Admiral Horthy
the regent of Hungary," has, secretly lDBT DEI I

L NOT ALTER STATUS
UNION IN ANY OTHER
WAY

OF]

MEANS LARGE
IN AMOUNT+

SAVING
OF TAXES

In Accordance With Provisions of:
Amended Union Consti-
tution

bit officially offered the Hungarian
throne to former Emperor Charles,
with the assurance that all has been
Iarranged for the return of the Hap-
burg monarchy with the consent of
the majority of the population, ac-
cording to information from Prang-
ins, where the ex-emperor lives.
Admiral Horthy, it is declared, has
invited the former ruler to come to
Budapest as-soon as possible, adding
that the question with the Allies in
connection with the move could be
best arranged from the Hungarian
capital.
The former emperor, however, is
said to be apparently hesitating as to
his course and has not left Traginis.
Filed Petitions Necessary for Names
of Candidates to Appear on
Ballot
VOTER TO REGISTER PARTY
PREFERENCE AND CANDIDATE

Title to the building and grounds of
the Michigan Union was formally deed-
ed in trust to the Board of Regents
of the University and the deed ac-
cepted by the Regents at their meet-
ing' Friday. The transfer &f title,
which had been in contemplazion for
several years, will% alter the status of
the Union in no way except to bring it
under the category of public proper-
ty. -This will save many thousands of
dollars in taxes annually.
Frederick W. Stevens of the Board
of Governors issued the following
stateient Friday night regarding the
transfer: "In pursuance of the provi-
sions of the original constitution of
the Michigan Union adoptel several'
years ago and of the amended consti-
tution adopted last January, the title
to the Michigan Union building and
grounds has been deeded to the Re-
gents.of the University, which body ac-
cept.edr the deed today. The execution
of the deed was the very first act of
the new Board of Governors of the
Union, recently created, which has
control of the Union's finances and
which held its first formal meeting last
evening."

cha
boa:
nig
ed
'201
mel
excf
T
the
gen
to t
igar
ions
the-
the
A
of t
pen
at I
sity
May

ORS OF UNION
- FIRST MEETINl
ry W. Douglas was elected
at the first meeting of the
governors of the Union last
of. H. C. Sadler was elect-
airman and Carl T. Hogen,
chosen as secretary. All
of the board were present
rent 'J. O. Murfin of Detroit.
irman of the board reported
nous acceptance by the Re-
he University, of the deed
dings and land of the Mich-
n. This action had prey-
I the informal approval of
and wash formally ratified by
ers at this meeting.
>ve Convention Budget
I was given to the budget
eral secretary covering ex-
be incurred by the Union
ional convention of univer-
s to be held here early in

Only names of candidates who have
actually had petitions filed for them
with the Miphigan secretary of state
will appear on the ballot for the cam-:
pus presidential straw vote next
Thursday, according to an announce-
ment made last night by the Univer-
.sity Republican and Democratic clubs.
Thus students will be voting on sub-
stantially the same ballot which will
appear. in the state primaries April 5.
Committee ch'airmen of the two
clubs stated Friday that the ballots for
each party will be of the same form,
permitting each. voter to register .his
party preference and his candidate.
For .statistical purposes spaces will be
left at the top of.-each ballot for vot-
ers to state their department and
whether they are students or faculty.
Announce Order on. Ballot
William P. Smith, '20, and Elmer W.
Cress, '20, members of the University
Republican club executive committee,
announce the following candidates in
the order in which they will appear
on the Republican ballot: Warren J.
Harding, Hirap Johnson, Frank 0.
Lowden, John J. Pershing, Miles Poin-
dexter, Leonard Wood. As supporters
of Herbert Hoover have not filed his
name for the Michigan Republican
primary, students or faculty who wish
to vote for him while registering Re-
publican sympathies will have to write
it in a space left for names of other
candidates at the, foot of the ballot.
The Democratic ballot, as announc-
ed by Thurman B. Doyle, '21L, tempor-
ary dhairman of the University Demo-
cratic club, will contain the following
names: Herbert Hoover E. Mitchell
Palmer, Edward Edwards, William G.
McAdoo, and William J. Bryan.
Campaign of Information
Final plans for the preliminary

'Judges Vote 2 to 1 for Local Team in
Forensic tContest with
Illinois
RYGH, MoGOURK AND BROWN
FORM WELL BALANCED TEAM
BULLETIN'
Madison, March 26.- Michigan
won the debate from Wisconsin
here tonight by decision of 2 to 1.
Michigan defeated Illinois by a de-
cision of two to one in the debate held
last night in Hill auditorium. The
question_ was: Resolved - That em-
ployes, as such in each industrial cor-
poration, should be allowed to elect
from their own ranks at least cne-third
of the board of directors of such cor-
poration; all directors to have equal
rights and privileges. Michigan up-
held the affirmative and Illinois the
negative.
Michigan's team, composed of T. Mil-
ton Rygh, '21, Anna M. McGurk, '20,
and Oscar A. Brown, '21, were termed
by Mr. Louis Eich of the oratory de-
partment "one of the best balanced
teams Michigan has ever had." Every
member of the, team contests strongly
for preier honors of the debate.
Sandier Best Illinois Han
Edward A. Sandler was responsi-
ble for some of the most effective
speaking done by the Illinois team.
He was a member of a debating team
that participated in a forensic dontest
in Ann Arbor two years ago. The re-
maining members of the Illinois team
were George C. Gilbert and John
Powell, Jr.
Michigan rested its case on the
points that one-third representation of
the employes of all industrial corpora-
tions on the board of directors of such
corporations was just, beneficial to,
both capital and labor, and practica-
ble. Illinois contended that the plan
was unsound in principle and would
not eliminate industrial wars. They
proposed voluntary co-operation be-
tween employers and emplpives in its
place.
Dean Bates Presides
Dean Henry M. Bates of tho Law,
school acted as presiding officer of the
debate and was introduced' by Carl'
Brandt, '22L. The judges were Judge
C. T. Johnson, Lloyd T. Williams, and
Howard eLwis, all of Toledo.
TRACK SQUAD IN BUFFALO ,
(Special to The Daily)
Buffalo, N. Y., March 26. - ]
Track squad arrived here late
this evening; men all in good
condition, and eager for the
meet tomorrow with Cornell.
Stopping at the Statler tonight,
and leaving for Ithaca tomor-
row at 9:30 o'clock.
(Signed) BOB ANGELL.- 1

NINE MEN ELECTED
TO OR-DER OF COIF
Elections- to the Order of Coif, the
honorary society of the Law school,
were announced yesterday by the sec-
retary of the school. The new mem-
bers 'are as follows: t. D. Campbell,
R. L. Carpenter, R. G. Day, Louis
Kawin, G. H. Kretzschmar, B. B.
Mathews,'J. M. Seabright, A. B. Tan-
ner, and J. A. Yager.
Men are chosen annually from those
of the senior law class, for standings
chiefly, although other elements en-
ter, such as persoi ,ality, popularity,
campus activities and class activities.
The requirements and standard are"
similar to those of Phi Beta Kappa.

President Burton Will Livo In
Angell Homestead on Cam-_
Push

Old

NECESSITY FOR MORE FUNOS GIVEN
AS REASON FOR BOOST: AUTHORIZE
NEW HOME FOR UNIVERSITY NURS[

'PAT WIA gPASSES.
CHARMSAUDI-ENCE
Junior Girls' Play Shows Exceptional
Ability for Youthful
Amateurs
MARJORIE WEST, '21, SHOWS
ABILITY IN LEADING ROLE
(By H. Hardy Heth and Bruce Millar)
And the question still is: "Why
were-not all men permitted to come?"
For, had "Patricia Passes" been
given in any other middle western
university the largest play-house
available would have been secured,
metropolitan dailies would have fill-
ther retogravure sections with pic-
tures of the cast; and, had Michi-
gan men seen Michigan women, as
did a select few last night, certain
provincial opinions now existing
might have been changed.
From the first sway of the curtain
in the' opening chorus, "Life .is a
Masquerade," through the "Dance of
the Sprites" with its spirit of fantasy,
followed by the "Cleopatria Dance,"
rythmatic in its breath of Oriental
wizardy, through the college take-'
offs, "I'm Blue," and "Out o' Luck,"
the sixteenth Junior Girls' play com-
bined the finesse of the professional
with the charm of the amateur.
Marjorie West, as Patricia Melton,
honored by having the play written for
her, assumed center stage with a nat-
uralness and innate potentiality that
gave her undisputed honors and re-
peated, applause. Closely seconding
her, however, Frances Maire, the dain-
ty Japanese, Yoto-San, portrayed the
only pathos of the entire production,
and danced her way into the hearts of
the audience and her suitor, Saki-
Sama.
Jean Wallace Distinctive
Jean Wallace, depicting David Todd
Bangs, the downy-cheeked freshman,
was decidely not "Out o' Luck" in her
character portrayal which proved the
distinctive hit of the show. Accom-
panied by Marie Crozier, as Jane, the
vamping sorority pledge, this pair
could understudy to perfection those
premier funmakers in The Follies,
Johnny and Ray Dooley.
(Continued on Page Six)

Construction of a home for nurses
of the University hospital, remodeling
of the president's home, and rebuild-
ing of University Hall into a small-
er auditorium and six class rooms
were some of the improvements au-
thorized by the Board of Regents at
its meeting yesterday afternoon. This
work was entrusted to the buildings
and grounds department.
Will Spend $100,000
Approximately $100,000 will be
spent in order to effect these differ-
ent improvements. The nurses' home,
which will be built in close proximity
to the new University hospital, will'
be a temporary frame structure, to
involve an expenditure of about $55,-
000. One hundred nurses will be ac-
commodated in the new building.
With the decision of the Regents to
appropriate money for the refixing of
President Angell's old home, it be-
comes definitely known that President-
elect Burton vill dwell on the cam-
pus. Thirty thousand dollars, it is
estimated, will be required to lay'
suitable floors in the dwelling, patch
up the roof, put on a porch, and make
the Angell home habitable.
To relieve congestion of class rooms,
the Buildings and grounds department
was given the power to build three
class rooms on the north and south
sides of the first floor of University
Hall, making a total of six. This will
leave the gallery unchanged, and
make the audtiorium main floor nar-
rower. Twelve thousand dollars will
be expended op these changes.
Let Contract for Plans
The firm of Perkins, Fowler, and
Hamilton, architects of Chicago, was
given the contract for drawing plans
for the new model training high
school of the department of educa-
tion. A representative of this firm
'recently conferred with Prof. A. S.
Whitney of the educational depart-
,ment, on this matter.
Enlargement of the law library was
also authorized by the Regents. A
committee of Regent Junius E. Beal,
President Harry B. Hutchins, and Sec-
retary Shirley W. Smith was appoint-
ed to consider means of relieving the
congestion in the Medical school and
Dental college.
Leave of absence was granted to
Professor Dymon, teacking industrial
education in Grand Rapids, who has
been forced to give up his work due to
illness. In the short time since the
fall that he has been in this work,
his work in Grand Rapids has grown
extensively, and he was asked to take
.Iasse inMuskegon.
Grant Degrees
Three law degrees of LL.B., wpreE
granted to Robert H. Dunn, Lester B.
Harper, and Rollin R. Winslow. A
hospital recorder for clinic recordsI
was provided for the University 'hos-
pital.
The proposition of having reprinted
in pamphlet form the speeches whichE
were given at the dedication of the1
General Library was referred to thet
Library committee. A copy of tha willt

Fees of the University for next year
were raised on an average of 30 per
cent by the Regents at their meeting
yesterday. Although the apparent in-
crease was more, the abolition of lab-
oratory fees, except where actual
consumption of material 'occurs,
brings the increase to an approximate
30 per cent.
Hereafter a deposit for material will
be required in laboratory courses and
a refund given for the unused amount.
Necessity for more funds was given
as the reason for this act, which has
been under consideration for some
time.
The ruling affects both resident and
non-resident students. With the res-
ident students, the increase in tuition
averages more proportionally than of
non-residents, but the actual raise is
more for men and women coming from
other states.
$200,000 Income
The new scale calls for an addi-
tional payment of between $30 and $35
by Michigan students, aiid from $35
to $40 by non-residents.
If the enrollment next year keeps
up to that of the present semeter, a
total of more than $200,000 will be
realized from the recent act of the Re-
gents. Mounting costs of operating
the University will consume the re-
ceipts from the increase. The sub-
mission of next year's budget, compil-
ed by the deans of the various colleg-
es, is thought to have crystallized the
feeling for a raise in tuition, which the
Regents have considered for some
time.
Give New Scale
The new scale of fees which will be
paid on registration next fall is:: Lit-
erary college, residents, $76 for wom-
en, $80for men, non-residents, $101 for
women, $105 for men; College of Engi-
neering and Architecture, residents,
$91-for women, $95 for men, non-res-
idents, $116 for women and -$120 for
Inv; Medical school, residents, $136
for women, $140 for men, non-resi-
dents, $161 for women, and $165 for
men; Law school, residents, $101 for
women, $105 for men, non-residents,
$121 for women, and $125 for men;
Homoeopathic school, residents, $136
for women, $140 for men, non-resi-
dents, $161 for women, $165 for men;
Dental college, residents, $136 for
women, $140 for men, non-residents,
$171 for women, $175 for men; Phar-
macy college, residents, $91 for wom-
en, $95 for men, non-residents, $116
for women, $120 for men; Graduate
school, residents, $76 for women, $80
for men, non-residents, $101 for wom-
en, and $105 for men. Difference be-
tween the fees of'the men and women
is caused by the inclusion of the Union
membership fee in the men's tuition.
Tuition Still Low
Despite this rather sweeping in-
crease in tuition, Michigan still charg-
es less than many of the other large
universities of the country. Rates in
the literary colleges of some of the
universities are: Columbia, $20, Yale,

LET CONTRACT FOR
PLANS OF MODEL
SCHOOL

DRAWING
HIGH

WILL SPEND $100,000
FOR IMPROVEMENTS

AMOUNT WILL STILL BE LOW
COMPARED WITH OTHER
SCHOOLS
NEW FEES-WILL BRING
INCOME UP TO $200,
Fees for 1920 Will Average About
Per Cent More than This
Year

tive#

were adopted by the
to the manner in which
s shall be kept, and coy-
,ration of accounts into
ag to. the construction
g of the building and
to its operation and up-

anu ru
those r
keep.

Heath Reappointed
Homer L. Heath was reappointed
general managet of the Union and a
committee was appointed to draw up
rules of procedure for the board, as
well as to arrange for a regular time
of meeting.'

campaign of information preceding the
vote will not be made until the meet-
ing Sunday afternoon of heads of the
two party clubs and a representative
of The Daily. As the petition of the
University Republican club for the use
of Hill auditorium for a straw vote
mass meeting was turned down by the
Board of Regents March 12, the gei -
eral meeting will be held in the Union
instead.
It is desired that University wom-
en vote on the straw ballot, and spe-
cial boxes will be provided' for them
in addition to the regular polling plac-
es in various campus buildings.
Plans include the printing in The
Daily of the records and qualifications
of all the candidates, as compiled by
their supporters. Every effort will be
made to give all student and faculty
voters a chance to inform themselves
and to express their opinions in the
forums to be held at the Union.
British Arrest Turkish- Goverhor
Constantinople, March 26.-Ali Said

I
I
'I

NAVAL RESERVES, NOTICE!
Naval reserves wishing in-
formation reigarding confirma-
tion of ratings and recent naval
reserve orders, sign list at Un-
ion desk before April 1. If 50
names are thus secured, Lieut.-
Commander Wenzeree will come
from Detroit at a date to be
named later, to advise students
on these matters. Further in-
formation at Union desk.

Honey Interests Trying ,To Buv
Party Conventions, Says Borah

Washington, March 26. - A direct
charge that big financial interests were
trying to buy the nationial convention
of both the Republican and Democratic
parties was made in the senate today
by Senator Borah, republican of Ida-
ho, in a speech advocating congres-
sional action to regulate the pre-con-
ventioiq expenditures of candidates for
the presidency.
Concentrating his attack on the
backers of Major-General Leonard
Wood and Gov. Frank O. Lowden, of
Illinois, candidates for the Republi-
can nomination, Senator Borah declar-
ed the Wood managers "were at-
tempting to control the Republican
convention by the use of money, while
the Lowden organization' appaiently
was spending even greater zums to.
gain support for their candidate."

as much as any' Republican in the
field.
Calling on all candidates to tell the
country voluntarily how much they
were spending and where it was com-
ing from, Senator Borah cited news-
paper reports that the Wood promot-
ers have collected a campaign fund of
$1,000,000 and that every vote cast for
Wood or Lowden in the recent South
Dakota primaries represented an ex-
penditure of $10.
Senator Borah's speech was made in
support of a bill to be introduced to
limit the pre-convention expenditure3
of any candidate to $10,000 in each
state. Another bill of the same gen-
eral nature drafted three years ago by
a special sub-committee but never act-
ed on, was re-introduced by Senator
Pomerene, Democrat, and Senatorl
Kenyon, Republican of Iowa, suggest-
ing that a resolution be adopted in the
near future for a congressional inves-
tigation of expenditures this year.

I

of the late Henry Russell, who left $242, Princeton, $276, Pennsylvania,
$10,000 to the University and $2,500 $221, Cornell, $204, Harvard, $200, Chi-
to the Michigan Union was filed. f cago, $154. Non-resident stud'ents at
The next meeting will be held April Minnesota must pay $98, at Wiscon-
30. sin, $124, at Michigan Agricultural
college, $250, and resident students are
JUNIOR ENGINEERS PLAN taxed $68 at Minnesota.and $57.50 at
THEATER -PARTY TONIGHT Michigan Agricultural, college. Tuition
at both Ohio and Illinois are compara-
Two hundred junior engineers have tively little, most of their funds being
purchased tickets for the movie par- derived from the state legislature.
ty to be held at the Majestic theater Little importance was attached by
tonight. It is planned to adjourn to Secretary Shirley W. Smith to the
the Union tap room after the show for supposition that the tuition raise was
refreshments and a program of songs partially aimed at keeping down next
and speeches. ' year's enrollment.

Pasha, military governor of Constan- Within 10 days he predicted two Dem-
tinople, has been arrested by the Brits ocratic aspirants whom he did not
ish forces in the city. name would be found spending quite'

4

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