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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 25, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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:...

F aTHE IVS i
OF THE UNIVERSITY

xcept
ol of

[onday during the Univer-
.udent Publications.

OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
>ress is exclusively entitled. to the use for
ws dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
and the local news published therein.'
>sto ice at Ann Arbor. Michigan, as second
arrier or mail, $3.50.
or Press building, Maynard street.
96o; Editorial, 2414.

o exceed 3oo words, if signed, the sig-
appear in print, but as an evidence of
swill be published in The Daily at the
Sleftat or mailed to The Daily office.
will- receive no consideration. Igo ian"
nless the writer incloses postage.
necessarily endorse the sentiments'ex.
ions.
tces will not be received after 8 o'clock
nsertion.

ding i

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
NTG EDITOR.................HARRY M.t CAREY
ors-
Mark K. Ehlbert Edgar L. Rice
C. M. Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
George Brophy Hugh Hitchcock
............H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
..............Renaud Sherwood
stant. .....................................John I. Dakin
stant ..............................Brewster Campbell
.........Robert C. Angell
Department......................Marguerite Clark
....Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Assistants
G.. L. Clarke
Thomas J. Whinery
R. W. Wrobleski
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt

Winefred Biethan
Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer
Ed Ana Apel
E. P. Lovejoy

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
MANAGER.................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
....LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
Classified Ads.........................Henry Whiting
. .. ..........Edward Priehs
..C.. . .........Curt P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan

Assistants
F. M. Heath .
Sigmund Kunstadter
Harold Lindsay

D. P. oyce
Robt. Sommerville
Arthur L. Glazer

h1 wishing to secure information concern' g news for any
he Daily should se' thetnight editor, who has full charge
s to be printed that night.
night 'editors for ,the eek will .be: Monday
/ark K. Ehbert; Tuesday might, Edgar I
Vednesday night, George Brophy; Thursday
lugh. Hitchcock; Friday night, Chesser
11; Saturday night, Joseph Bernstein.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 1920.
"MICHIGAN DAY"
dent Harry B. Hutchins is to be the guest
yr at the "Michigan Day" exercises to be
Detroit on Friday, April 16. These exer-
ill mark the farewell appreciation' tendered
Detroit alumni to Michigan's outgoing pres-
tine consecutive years President Hutchins
ped the policies of the University. In that
has done much for the institution towardi
very Michigan man feels so deeply loyal.
v Library, the Natural Science building, th
rnent and -growth of the University as a
iave all been the result of the untiring ef-
t the part of this man.
:elebration of "Michigan Day" will be the
x for again showing our president that the
ity will long remember the splendid work
rnplished, and will always hold in the high-
em and devotion the man who did so much
:Michigan one of the greatest Universities
ountry today.
THE FRENCH MEMORIAL
Ann Arbor campaign for subscriptions to
o,ooo fund for the erection of the Monu-
the Marne, as America's gift to France,
oday. This gift will correspond in spirit
tatue of Liberty which France donated to
I in 1885 and will be a suitable commemo-
f the friendship and sympathy of the two
Arbor's share of the fund is only $250. On
of the smallness of the amount it has been
d that no contributions exceed 25 cents. In
r the memorial will be truly representative of
eople of this country.
dering the worthiness of the cause and the
>nations needed for its accomplishment, the
ity alone should easily oversubscribe this
he members of the Sphinx will take care of
lus contributions and noon ought to find
lichigan student wearing one of their red
UTILIZING THE FACULTY '
n almost every subject under the sun, there
n .in the University faculty able to give
hile and expert information. There is no
ig the fact that much of this knowledge is
waste; and this in the face of an awakening
Aduate interest in political events, and an
resent curiosity about important scientific
aents. If the faculty were given an oppor-
comment in public on' the great happen.
ch are noted daily in the press, the Uni-
vould add to its usefulness tremendously.
be giving a course attended from interest
it as truly educational as any in the curri-

then determined by discussion in the committee
which of the departments is best prepared to fur-
nish the speaker on the chosen event. The special-
ist in that department who has the most detailed
and expert knowledge on the subject is then asked
to make the address, which is scheduled, say, for
the following Monday or Tuesday afternoon, in'the
Natural Science auditorium. This suggestion is
merely for the first few lectures; the chances are
that within a short time Hill auditorium's capaci-
ties would have to be called upon to handle the
crowd of seekers after information.
To vary the practical working of the idea, it
would seem a good plan to set aside, say, one week
in four, to be turned over to each department in
l rotation, at which not current events but that par-
ticular department's latest contribution to knowledge
would be the subject. For example, on one Tues-
day we could hear alt economic expert on "The
Rise and Fall of Prices ;" another day, an engineer-
ing authority on "How to Choose Building Mate-
rials for Your Home ;" or again, a member of the
political science faculty on "State Constitutions and
Public Welfare," or a law professor on "How to
Keep Out of Trouble in Every Day Contracts."
Scarcely any departmept but has some subject of-
real general interest on which it possesses worth-
while information.
It would seem almost siperfluous to give credit
for attendance, though in the matter of broad ed-
cational value this course would be hard to equal
in the University.
THE OLD SONGS
Anything savoring of the "College Boy" is nat-
urally repugnant to real university students. A host
of meaningless customs practiced when our fathers
[ attended the University have been gradually dis-
carded.
There are, however, many conventions of the old
days well worth saving, which the rapid growth of
the University has tended to obscure. The feeling
of good-fellowship and commonwealth among stu-
dents is in danger of being lost, with an increase in
numbers. Among the traditions that can keep this
feeling alive are the old Michigan songs, most o
which seem to have died with the passing of Larry's
and Joe's. The Mimes have set about the task of
reviving them; they will be sung in the Union tap-
room, with a view to reanimating their former pop-
uilarity. It behooves the rest of us to give this ef-
fort our hearty support, and keep the old spirit
alive.
. 1
-The ,Telescope
"Her feet be'neath her petticoat.
'Like little mice stole in and out."
Anon.
But just imagine what would have happened if she
chanced to look down at her own feet.
She-I don't think any one can be really good
looking unless they are well dresse'd.
le-Oh, I don't know; no one ever tried to ac-
case the Mack Sennet bathing girls of being homely.
And then the silence slowly conjealed around
them.
Greater Love Hath No Man, Etc.
Mr. Frank Fletcher is ill at his home with a bad
cold. Mr. Erwin Howland is temporarily suffer-
ing in his place.-Bainbidge Republican.
Yes, Clarice, you are quite correct when you say
Jhe the new elevator dance is the easiest to.learn-
there are no steps to it.
Our Daily Novelette
He entered the room, an avowed skeptic and un-
believer. The spiritualist catching sight of him
asked in a low tone, "You wish my aid ?" "Well in
a way I do," he replied, "you see I just called about
" "Ah, certainly I know all about it," inter-

rupted the spiritualist, "and-I also know that you
have met with several disappointments lately in
connection with this affair."
II
The man stared. Could it be that after all there
was something to this spiritualism at which he had
so often openly scoffed. "Yes, yes, you are right,"
he said in a dubious tone of voice. ,The spiritualist
continued in her droning voice, "I can also see that
there is something which you have striven hard
for but it has always eluded you." By this time the
last vistage of disbelief had vanished from the
man's eyes. He listened in awe-struck ,wonder as
this wonderful creature rent the veil of the future
before his very eyes.:
III
"Yes, go on," he cried hoarsely in a voice which he,
scarcely recognized as his own. The spiritualist
knit her brows for a few moments and then con-
tinued, "But I can also see that success will attend
your efforts and that you will succed in getting that
mosey which you are rightfully entitled to but
which that other party has been withholding from
you." The man breathed an audible sigh of re-
lief. "I'nt very glad to hear it, ma'am," he said as he
pulled a piece of paper out of his pocket. "I've
called five times before with this gas bill and I'm
sure tickled that at last I'm going to get the money."
J. W. K.
Famoits Closing Lines
"Tie's a very close friend of mine," said the stu-
dent when his room mate refused to lend him a
dollar. - NOAH COUNT.

DETROIT UNITED LINES'
(Oct. -6, 1919)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:so a.
m.,.and hourly to 9:to p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars--8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make local slops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6 :os a. in., 9:9 8a.
m. and every two hours to g :05 p. m., to :so
U. m. To Ypsilanti Only, xz:t . P. ., s:so-
a. m.. and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Boun4--7:48 a. in. and
12:2o a. m.
MARCH
S M T W T V S
.. 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12, 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 .. .
Men-Hats are high; your last
season's hat cleaned and re-
blocked into this season's shape,
with a new band, will look like
new and save you five or ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. P4one 1792.
Ii lll l l tl ll i1111111111111111111111111 f,
= TOM HART.
i wit~h his
"I'M SUSPICIOUS"
c -
is a feature of
"GEORGE DID IT"
tlalEI1t1uuh1iggiugIiit1i 11.m 111...........

lilil!!illlEtilliiltil! ll llfillllliftili l lIallit lifillllillittlllllll li _
Just Received--
- a-
eona rd-A W ood
-k
Administrator, Soldier and Citizen
By
Prof. William Herbert Hobbs
-r _
-
PRICE $2.00
= UNIVERSITY
WAHRS BOOKSTORES
George Did It Coorge Did it
s 11 11!N l 11111111111111!!~ IU !1ll 11N'll illilltl'lifiltlflllll lfnittflilllllllllilllit
" fhe nasterda/i/z gpe/dr
A man is judged by the
pencil he keeps.
A well-sharpened Dixon's
Eldorado is a friend to be
proud of. -
JOSFEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO..
pencil Dept. Jersey City, N. J.
Canadian Di.tribuiors
A. R. SaoDou all & Co., Ltd.
Toroato
A0
jU'forrviy01.

--..

Have You Visited

TWO
STORES

GRAHAM'S
"George Did It"
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

GRAHAM'S
NEW BOOKS PUT ON SALE EACH DAY
WATCH THE DAILY FOR SPECIAL FEATURES

4'

A

(

ir WI

Fashion

EX1

WHICH YOU ARE CORDIALLY
INVITED TO AlTTEND

''

TODAY, THURSDAY, MARCH 25, THE L AST DAY
Music FROM Two TO FIVE O'CLoCK!
The Store will not be open in the evening

'A

}
THIS STORE ANNOUNCES ITS
COMPLETE READINESS FOR THE SEASON

SPRING ASSEMBLAGE OF

l

Suits, Coats, Dresses, Blouses Skirts,
Miffiner and Accessories

$9E
- A d ~ v

~~~~~1~ -._.-w - .. ~~

..-

124 SoLPTH MAIN STREET

. ---s-

DOWNTOWN

a committee of faculty met
.ppointed to decide, on Sat-
of the past, week from the
political standpoint. It is

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