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March 25, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-25

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PRESS
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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 1920.

.PRICE, THREE

,RCEHE

RY
TRE TYY....: r

' DEBATING SUA
GOE TOMADISON-
Negative Team Will Meet Wisconsin
Tomorrow Night on Industrial
Question
AFFIRMATIVE DEBATERS WILL
CONTEST ILLINOIS TEAM HERE

} - - ,. ",

GHOOVER ADHERENTS
IORGANIZE TONIGHTI

A

NOW
ATION

aas Declares Congress
rer to Pass Pact Over
sident's Veto.
ssociated Press)
March 24.-With plans
laration at a standstill
republican leaders of
ay conferred on means
ction on the declaratory
their end of the capi-

MICHIGAN'S NEGATIVE TEAM
C. M. YOUNGJOHN, '22L, J. W. HINDES, '21, AND J. K. POLLOCK.

QUESTIONNAIRES MAILED
TO OUTSIDE UNIONS

ere was no final decision on the
of the resolution or the time of
presentation but it was said an
ement probably would ebe reached
in a few days. Several suggest-
rafts are under consideration, al,
hem following in some respects
Knox resolution which has been
oved by the Senate Foreign Re-
ns committee.
aew element was injected into the
tion today by Senator Thomas,
crat of Colorado, who declarea
if President Wilson vetoed a
e declaration, as many senators
ve he will do, congress would
no authority to pass it over the
LITSNME SPAKRS

CONCERN PROBLEMS TO BE DEALT
WITH AT UNION CONVEN-
TION IN MAY
To facilitate the ':interchange of
ideas between university Unions and
to have at hand the solution of some
of their problems when they convene
here early in May, questionnaires
have been sent out to Unions and
similar organizations by the general
secretary and financial secretary of
the Michigan Union. Discussions of
these problems at theyonvention will.
also be facilitated thereby.
Questions relating to student activ-
ities are covered, as for instance in-
quiring by what system each uni-
versity Union discovers what talent
exists on ; the campus 'and how men
are located for specific interests.
Further inquiries deal with the mat-
ter of student employment,- universal
union membership and similar, prob-'
lems.
As a means of getting in closer
touch with the alumni, plans are now
under consideration to bring to Ann
Arbor for this convention of Unions
the secretaries of alumni associations,
who will meet here the following
week for their annual convention. In-
vitations will be sent out to them as
soon as the speakers for the Union
.onvention have accepted. Programs
can then be printed and included
with the invitations.
ZOELINERS MRK CLOSE
oF MATNEE MUSICALE

FRENCH MEMORIALTO SE
Of HUGE PR OPRTINS
CAMPAIGN FOR FUND OPENS ON
CAMPUS THIS MORN-
ING
The statue of a woman, worn ana
beaten down by the storm of battle but
dauntlessly raising aloft the flag of
liberty, is to be the memorial pre-
sented to the French people by the
American people, according to infor-
mation received today from the na-
tional executive committee for the
campaign. It is planned to have the
statue of huge proportions, perhaps
even larger than the Statue of Lib-
erty, though that point has not been
definitely decided. The Bartholdi
statue is the largest work of its kind
in the world.
The memorial is to 'be erected at
Meaux upon a site to be selected oy
Marshal Foch and Marshal Joffre.
Meaux, the "frontier of freedom," was
the high point of the German advance
in 1914.
The campaign on the campus opens
this morning. At the three places
designated, one in front of the Li-
brary, one in University hall and one
in Engineering arch, subscriptions
will be received and the little red
tags passed out.
It is the desire of the Sphinx com-
mittee in charge to limit the drive
to today and it is thought that no
longer time will be required to raise
the campus allotment.
Opera Tickets
Going Rapidly

Michigan's negative debating teant
leaves at 8:50 o'clock this morning for
Madison, Wis., to meet Friday night
witr Wisconsin affirmative team in the
fifth annual Mid-west debate.
Illinois Team Here
The same night Michigan's affirma-
tive team will meet the Illinois nega-
tive team in Hill auditorium and at
Urbana, Ill., their negative team will
meet the affirmative team of Wiscon-
sin. The league question this year is,
"Resolved-That employes as such of
each industrial corporation should bt.
allowed to elect from their own ranks
at least one-third of the board of di-
rectors of such corporations-all di-
rectors to have equal rights and priv-
ileges." Mr. Ray K. Immel, of the ora-
tory department and contest director,
will accompany the team to Madison.
Teams Up to Standard
The two teams had a head-on de-
bate last night in their final prac-
tice. Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood of
the oratory department said, "These]
teams compare well with the standard
of former Michigan teams, especially
of those since 1918, when the ruling
was passed that only undergraduates
can participate."

' Herbert Hoover and his aspects as
man, administrator, scientist, and pub
lic servant will be presented at 7:30
o'clock tonight in the assembly hall
at the Union, when campus support-
ers will assemble for the purpose of
forming a Hoover-for-President club.
Presiding over the' meeting will be
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the Gradu
ate school. The program of speakers
includes Prof. Evans Holbrook of the
Law school, who will take ap Hoover
as viewed by the Californians, telling
of his prestige in his native state. He
will be followed by Dean E. H. Kraus
of the Summer session, who will dear
with his presidential candidate as a
scientist and public servant.
Other speakers will be the Rev.
Lloyd C. Douglas of the Congregation-
al church, Prof. C. T. Johnston of the
engineering, department, Prof. U. .
Phillips ' of the history department,
Miss Grace Greenwood, and James I.
McClintock, '21L.
This meeting is open to all stu-
dents on the campus, both wen and
women, and the club will not be par-
tisan unless Hoover definitely allies
himself wih some party. Townspeople
are also invited to attend.
9 QUINTET MEN
AWARDED LETTERS
Four "A. M. A.'s" Also Granted; Next
Year's Captain to Be Chosen
Today
STUDENT DIRECTOR TO BE
ELECTED INSTEAD OF NAMED

SIGMA DELTA CHI INVITES AL
CONFERENCE PUBLIC ATIONS
TO JOIN
SOCIETY TO ARRANGE
TALKS ON JOURNALISl
May Hold Convention' Here in May
Invite All School EditorsIn
State to Be Here
Temporary plans for the formatim
of a Western' conference journalisti
association were made at a meetin
of the Michigan chapter of Sigm
Deltd Chi, professional journalisti
fraternity, held last night at th
Michigan Union.
Letters will be sent out to th
heads of all the college publicatiou
of the Conference, inviting them t
attend the convention to be held i
Ann Arbor the first week in May
Plans will be suggested for a pres
service between the University pub'
lications and an effort will be mad
to create more co-operation and bette
feeling between the publications c
the Conference colleges.
Plan Convention
It is probable that the conventio:
will be held at the same time as th
meeting of representatives of the va-
rious university unions which i
scheduled for May 6, 7, and 8.
It was the consensus of opinion a
the meeting, last night that the pro-
posed convention of the representa
tives of the college publications of tbe
state of Michigan should be held at th
same time.. Letters are being sent ou
to every college publication in th
state inviting them to attend a conven
tion in Ann Arbor for the' purpose. o
forming a Michigan Intercollegiat
Journalist's association.
To Arrange Lectures
In order to'create a larger interes
in journalism on the campus, the fra
ternity decided to make plans for.i
series of talks to be given in the Nat
ural Science auditorium by such prom

PNT ASSOCIATION Uf
COLEGE WRITER!

ane Committee Report:
Dues Are Payable

lass day speakers were elected at
Senior lit meeting yesterday as'
ows: The class orator is Carl
nson, class poet, Russel Barnes,
s historian, Ida Gratton, and class
phet, Mark Ehlbert.
he social compiittee reported plan.,
a smoker to be announced next
k. The pipe and cane committee
e selected pipes at Huston's and
ss, which will cost $3.50 egraved.
Wagner and company. It is asked
L all get in their measurements for
es at once.
ues are payable by mail to J. P.
t at 607 South State street. Caps
gowns should be secured. at once

JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY TO
BE PRESENTED TWICE
(By Dorothy Montfort)
For many years, the women of Ann
Arbor in general and of the Univer-
sity in particular who are real judges
of good productions have enjoyed the
dramatic ability shown by junior girls
in their annual play.
Will Give Two Productions
In former years, the small seating
capacity of Sarah Caswell Angell hall
necessitated the turning away of a
number of people. Even the Whitney
theater which was used last year
failed to accommodate all who wished
to attend. To do away, with this dif-
ficulty two productions have been
planned for Friday night and Satur-
day afternoon.
Cast WPell Fitted
Prof. John R. Blrumm has stated
that never before have the members
of the cast been so well fitted for their
parts. The singing and dancing fea
tures of the 19 choruses are of a su*
perior quality, while the intricate
steps are said to rival those of Al
Jolson's "Sinbad." A diversity of tal-
ent is represented, several nationali-
ties taking part.
A few tickets are still available at'
Graham's book store.
Spirits To Walk
In Next Gargoyle

liulletin

(By Associated Press)
ago, March 24.-The board of
as at the University of Illinois'
accepted the .resignation of
ent Edmund James, and ap-'
d him president emeritus ef-
Sept. 1. President James re-
because of over work.
id Kinley, acting president, was
ued temporarily as head of the
tion. No new buildings will
cted or equipment added to the
sity this year the board de-
lue to heavy expense during the
ad prospective salary increases
ilty members.
rch Issue of Chimes Delayed
to congested conditions of the
rbor Press company the March
r of the Chimes will not be out
aturday or possibly Monday.

The Zoellner quartet comprised of
musicians of the highest type of en-
semble virtuosity gave, perhaps, the.
best concert in the Matinee Musicale
series in the closing concert last even-
ing in Pattengill auditorium.
The quartet includes the talented
Joseph Zoellner, his son, Amandus,
daughter, Antoinette, and Jascha Sel-
witz, who substituted for Joseph
Zoellner, :Jr., who was forced to can-
cel his trip at the last moment.
Splendid co-operation was one of the
characteristic attributes of the quar-
tet in addition to technical skill and
inspiring interpretations.
In regard to the pr'ogramn it was
ratherconservatively conventional, a
little heavy and with few decided con-
trasts. However, the numbers were
all beautifully musical if not brilliant
and elaborate, technically..
Thy scherzo allegro was distinctive
for its pizzacato measures and flute-
like artifices. The nocturne andante
was replete with reiterated melodies
between the various instruments. The
Brandts-Buys "Romantic Serenade'
replaced the Sinding Serenade. Due
to several of the scores being forgot-
ten it was necessary to change some.
of the numbers in the latter half of
the program. This serenade possess-
ed a funereal, spasmodic, muttering
throughout which seemed to have no

Members of the Union will have
their last chance to secure tickets for
"George.Did It" today before the wo-
men of the University and townspeo-
ple are given an opportunity to place
their orders. After 5 o'clock this aft-
ernoon they will be placed on the
same basis as others. The box of-
fice sale for University women will
be held from 2 to 5 o'clock Saturday
afternoon at Hill auditorium. Slips
for the order of this sale may be se-
cured at the uffile of the dean of
women today and tomorrow.
Good Seats Left
Although there has been a heavy
sale of seats to Union members and
men of the cast, committee and chor-
us during the last few days there are
still a number of good seats avail-
able for most of the performances.
Indications point to well filled houses
at all six of the local performances.
Rehearsals Under Way
The rehearsals are well under way
with Director Shuter running the men
through the whole performance al-
most every night. "If the costumes
were here the show could be put on
next Monday," said Mr. Shuter last
night.
Westerners Club Arrange for Dance
Final plans for a dance were made
at the meeting of the Westerners club
at their meeting at Lane hall last
night. The dance will be held Friday
night, April 2, at Packard hall. Ar-
rangements for 70 couples have been
made and Westerners and their'friends
are invited.

Nine basketball "I's" and foui
"A. M. A.'s" have been awarded by the
Board in Control of Athletics. The
following men will receive their let-
ters: Captain Rychener, Dunne, Wil-
liams, Wilson, Karpus, Rea, Hender-
son, Peare, and Weiss. Cook, Ge-
virtz, Pearman, and Borinstein will be
awarded "A. M. A.'s." ~
The election of next year's captain
will be held today. He will be chosen
by the nine men who have been award-
ed "M.'s"
Karpus Scores 75 Points
Karpus, although he played in but
eight Conference games led the Michi-
gan team in scoring with 75 points.
Dunne was second with 54 points, ana
Rea was responsible for 46 counters.
Thirty-one, of Karpus' ponts were
made from the foul- line, whereas,
neither Dunne n Rea dik any free
throwing. Dunne, Rea, and Wilson
were the only Michigan men who
played in all 12 contests.
To Elect Student Members
At a meeting of the Board of Di-
rectors yesterday, it was decIded that
the three student members of that
board should be elected at the an-
nual campus election from six men
nominated by the Board of Directors.
Heretofore the board has appointed
the student members of the Board in
Control of Athletics.
Letter Replaces Monogram
Another decision which was reach-
ed at the meeting concerns the em-
blem to be worn on Varsity hats.
From now on members of all teams
will wear a small block "M" on their
hats, instead of the monograms which
have been the rule previously.
The amended constitution and by-
laws of the Athletic association will
be completed after the next meeting.
of the directors according to a state-.
ment by D. A. Forbes, '22L, secretary
of the board.
WILL GIVE TALK ON
WESTERN C H I N A

Guest.
es will,
apart.

[TENSION OF TIME
[YEN TO INCOMPLETES
Registrar has granted no
ons of time for removing
>letesor taking absence
ations. In a few cases,
in laboratory sciences,
ministrative board' has
I extension of time upon
request. In all other
removals and examina-
nust have been complet-
ore March 21. Moreover
ulting grades must be re-
to me by the instructors

E

inent journalists as Stuart''
Chase Osborn, Al Weeks, and

P

It is expected that the spee<
be held about two wee

Spirits!
Stimulated by its attainment in the
Judge "College Wits" contest, the Gar-
goyle will offer its Spiritualist num-
ber on the campus tomorrow.
Spirits!
The four-color cover design by
Reed Bachman, '20, show the spirits
flowing freely. Think of it - just
pouring 'em down! Then a two page
drawing by Lee Boyd, '22, a reminis
cence on the spirits of by-gone days,
will-but that's telling too much about
it. Laugh at Sir Oliver Lodge in a
pictorial essay by Waldo W. Gower,
'23, and continue to laugh with every-
one else at the mirth and fun which
the Gargoyle has extracted from 'the
shady spirits.
SENIOR LITS DEFEAT UPPER
CLASS LAWS FOR CHAMPIONSHIP
Senior lits defeated the upperclass
laws 21 to la in the deciding game
of the interclass series at Waterman
gymnasium last night. The lineup:
Laws-Cohn and Greenwald, f.; Mat-
ern and Houghton, g.; Loring, c.
Lits-Borinstein and Van Boven, f.;
Elmer Cress, c.; Earl Cress and Klein,
g"

NAM IALUMNICOMMITTEE
Definite Plans for Commencement
Week Completed Tomorrow
Appointment of the following fac-
ulty men .has been made to constitute
a committee on alumni entertainment
during Commencement week: Dean
John R. Effinger, chairman; Profs. E.
Holbrook, J. A. Bursley, C. C. Glover,
and Doctors J. G., Van Zwaluwenberg
H. M. Beebe, L. P. Hall.
Dean Effinger called a meeting of
the committee yesterday afternoon,
but due to the fact that a quorum
was not present no business was
transacted. Plans for alumni en-
tertainment have been .discussed
informally said Dean Effinger but
no definite reports can be made
until tomorrow noon, at which time
the committee will take lungh at the
Union and complete its plans.
Elective Engineers to Hear Osborn
At a meeting of the A. I. E. E. ot
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 348 of the
Engineering building Mr. H. S. Os-
born of the American Telephone and
Telegraph corhpany, will speak. The
lecture, which will be illustrated, will
be on the subject of "Electrical Trans-
mission'of Thought and Motion."
Chemical Engineers Meet Tonight
The Chemical Engineering .society
will meet at 7:30 tonight in room 151
of the chemistry building. Dean
Cooley, who was to address the meet-
ing, will 'be unable to be present be-
cause of illness. A substitute pro-
gram is being arranged.
Juniors to Enjoy "Y" Hospitality
About 50 juniors will be the guests
of the Y. M. C. A. at a dinner to be
held at the Union tonight. Harry
Carey will preside at the meeting,
which will be addressed by Prof. John
R. Brumm and Carl Johnson.

ultimate aim ending in a lingering
wail.
Percy Grainger's "Molly on the
Shore" was. beautifully interpreted in
a complicated play of light and shade.
The concluding work was the Hadyn
Serenade in lighter vein, giving the
first violin the dominant solo voice
with an obligato of the remaining

"Far Western China"- will be the
subject of a fecture to be given at 8
o'clock tonight in the Natural Science
'lecture room by Mr. Emil S. Fischer,
general manager of the North China
Commercial company.
Mr. Fisclier is conversant with this
section of China since most of his
work has been in that region. He de-
clined to comment on the -Shantung,
question, which he feels to be of im-
l ortance mainly to eastern China.
The lecture is given under the au-
spices of the Cosmopolitan club, and
is open to the general public.

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