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March 19, 1920 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-19

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SWARER TODAY

PRESS
DAY ANl) NIGHT
I ' SERVICE

VOL. XXX. No. 12l.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 1920.

PRICE

SENATE SUPPORTS
SELFGOVERNENT
CL9TMS OF IRISH
BREAKS LOOSE FROM CONTROL OF
REPUBLICAN LEAD-
ERS
DEMOCRATIC SENATORS
SUPPORT RESERVATION
Final Form of Resolution of Ratifica-
tion Prepared; vote Planned
Today
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 18.-Proceeding
under forced draft to reaTh a final
ratification vote on the peace treaty
tomorrow, the senate broke from con-
trol of the Republican leaders today
and unexpectedly swept into the Re-
publican reservation program, a de-
claration of sympathy for self-gov-
ernment in I:,a'and.
Demociats Support
During the debate Democratic lead-
ers supported the reservations, and
the managers of the Republican side
opposed it because it included a gen-
eral declaratoin that this nation ad-
hered to the principle of the self-de-
termination of people.
Revival. of the Irish question pro-
longed into the night the senate's
task of getting into final form the res-
olution of ratificaton on which it is
planned to bring a vote tomorrow.
One after another a long list of mis-
cellaneous reservations were voted
down as the leaders were bent on
completing their task before adjourn-
ment.
Simmons Makes Fight
After the Irish reservation had been
approved, Senator Simmons, Demo-
crat of North Carolina, made a last
minute fight to secure a change in
the Republican reservation to Article
X, but his substitute providing that
the United States would use "its
friendly offices" to help preserve ter-
ritorial. integrity -and political inde-
pendence was tabled by a vote of 45
to 34.
REGENT'S SON PLUNSS
FOnO CAR- INTO Ri1ER
MICRIGAN GRAD UNDER WATER
FOUR MINUTES IN CLOSED
AUTO
Smashing through the railing at the
foot of Woodward avenue, Detroit, in
a Ford sedan which somersaulted into
30 feet of water in the Detroit river
and emerging to the surface four
minutes later, after fighting his way
from the submerged car, was the ex-
perience at 1 o'clock Thursday morn-
ing at Travis F. Beal, '17, son of Re-
gent Junius E. Beal. ,
Accident Due to Steamed Widows
Bea, who lives in Ann Arbor but
also maintains a residence in Detroit,
attributed the accident to his not be-
ing well acquainted with the streets
in Detroit. While driving along the
lower end of Woodward avenue, the
windows of his closed car became
clouded with steam and he crashed
into th'e river front railing before he

had time to notice it.
In giving an account of the acci-
dent to his father over the phone
yesterday morning, Beal said that the
machine sank quickly and by batter-
ing the windshield with'his elbow he
was able to free himself from the au-
tomobile and reached the surface. A
life preserver was then thrown him
by a patrolman who had witnessed
the plunge. He was under water four
minutes.,
Escapes Serious Injuries
He was taken to the Receiving hos-;
pital after being rescued, but except
for a deep gash four inches long on
his right arm and a few other minor
injuries sustained in breaking open
the windshield, Beal was apparently#
none the worse for the accident and
was able to go home unassisted.
Beal graduated from the literary
college of the University in 1917. Dur-
ing the war he served as navigation
officer of the United States submarine

BARTELME WILL
ATTEND MEETING
Athletic Directors to Confer at. Chi-
cago with Yost Present
Athletic Director P. G. Bartelme left
for Chicago yesterday morning to at-
tend a meeting of Conference athletic
directors which will be held Saturday.
The officials for the football games
next fall will be chosen at this meet-
ing.
Coach Fielding H. Yost will be in
Chicago at the same time to attend a
meeting of the Conference coaches. He
will come to Ann Arbor Monday to
make arrangements for spring foot-
ball practice.
ILLINOIS GOVERNOR HERE
UNDER . .P. AUSPICES

Beauty, Chaperones, jazz; All
Ready For Tonight 's Soph Prom

To the strains of "The Victors,"
played by "Sandy" Wilson's 10 piece
orchestra, Douglas Dow, '22E, with his
partner, Helen M. Sturgis, of Detroit,
will commence the grand march of the
Sophomore Prom promptly at 9 o'clock
tonight in- the Union ball room. The
grand march will break right into the
first dance on the program of 20
numbers.
Chaperons for. the event will be.
President Harry B. Hutchins and
'Mrs. Hutchins, Dean M. E. Cooley and
Mrs. Cooley, Dean John ,R. Effinger
and Mrs. Effinger, Prof. F. P. Jordan
and Dean Jordan, Prof. W. G. Hoad
and Mrs. Hoad, Prof. L. R. Strauss
and Mrs. Strauss, Prof. W. R. Humph-
reys and Mrs. Humphreys, Prof. R. L.
Talamon and Mrs. Talamon.
Class Colors Used
The decorations will be carried out
in the class colors, red and white.
Banks of palms and flowers will be
placed in each of the four corners and
each of the end fireplaces will be con-
cealed beneath a mass of smilax,
palms, and flowers. The class emblem
in floral design will appear on the
mantelpieces.
Due to limited dining accommoda-
tions supper will be served in three
calls, different colored supper checks
being issued at the door. It is sug-
gested that members of parties wish-
ing to have supper together be sure
to get the same colored check.
Many Visiting Women
Many out of town guests are com-
ing to Ann Arbor for the Prom week-
end. Among those coming out from
Detroit are Misses Charlotte Wiley,
Ruth Kresge, Muriel Westbrook, Mar-

ion Leigh, Marjorie George, Elinor
Broock, Kathryn Rauch, Mary Ather-
ton, Jeannette Granet, Agnes Shell-
art, Marian Spaeder, Dorothy Adams,
and Dorothie Bernhard.
Other guests will be Miss Edwina

STONE TO ADDRESS
CHURCH WORKERS
Dr. John Timothy Stone, Chicago
minister of the Fourth Presbyterian
church, will visit Ann Arbor on Sat-
urday and speak at a 6 o'clock dinner
of church workers in Lane hall. At
7:30 o'clock in the evening he will
address a meeting of students at the
Congregational church on "The In-
vestment of a Life."
As the organizer of one of the most
influential churches in the city of
,Chicago, his public services have re-
cently been recognized by his election
to the presidency of the Union League
club of Chicago, a -leading business
men's club of that city. Dr. Stone
was a moderator of the general as-
sembly of the Presbyterian church
and held the rank of captain chaplain
of the Illinois reserve militia in 1917.
He also directed the religious work of
the Y. M. C. A. at Camp Grant dur-
ing the war.
MAINE CORPS SOCIETY
CONDEMNS RADICALISM

TO GIVE PUBLIC ADDRESS
MAJESTIC THEATER THIS
AFTERNOON

ATI

BULLETIN
Although a Detroit paper told of
the cancellationtofrall speaking dates
because of the illness of Governor
Lowden, this report could not be con-
firmed last last night.
Governor Frank 0. Lowden, Repub-
lican candidate for the presidential
nomination, is to arrive in Ann Ar-
bor at 11 o'clock this morning, ac-.
companied by his wife.
Upon their arrival they are to.be
taken to Martha Cook building, where
there is to be a reception in their
honor from 11:30 to 12:15 o'clock.
This is open to all University women.
Following the reception Governor
Lowden will deliver an address in the
Majestic theater whichi is open to the
public at 12:30 o'clock this afternoon.
A dinner wil lhe served in the Un-
ion directly after the speech, tickets
for which may be had from George
Struckman, '20L. The governor is to
give a short talk at the dinner, fol-
-lowing which he will proceed to Jack-
son and from there he will go to De-
troit where he is to finish up his Mich-
igan campaign Saturday.,
The Illinois governor is here under
the auspices of the University Republi-
can club and will deliver a non-partisan
address, though he will doubtless
speak of the budget system which he
is advocating.
JUNIOR ENGINEERS ELECT
STUDENT COUNCILMEN TODAY
Junior engineers will hold an elec-
tioli for Student councilmen from 8
to 12 o'clock and from 1 to 4 o'clock
today in the Engineering building.

STUDENTS PASS RESOLUTION
MEETING HELD LAST
NIGHT

ATI

I HELEN M. STURGIS, DETROIT
Martindale, Farmington; Miss Venus
Walker, Wayne; Miss Esther Rhodes,
Alma; Miss Marjorie Howard, Flint;
Miss Eleanor Cramer, Kalamazoo;
Miss Fay Hoffman, Milwaukee, Wis.;
Miss Leona Bernstein, Lima, 0.; Miss
Virgina Henley, Mattoon, Ill.

Invitations, and -announce-
for the senior lit class will go
on sale this afternoon in Uni-
versity hall from 4 to 5 o'clock.
This is positively the last oppor-
tunity that will be given to ob-
tain these -"announcements.
DAVID NASH. I
CO-OP STORE PLAN
AGITATED AT OHIO
A committee of 10 who are i epresen-
4atives of the various campus organ-
izations, has been appointed by the
Student council of Ohio State univer-
sity, in order to formulate plans for
the establishment of a co-operative
book store.

Nominees are: R. P. Dillon, R. B. - All material concerning the opera-
Marshall, M. E. McGowan, and R. 0. tion and success of similar stores at
Smith. other universities is collected by the
FORMER MANAGING EDITOR Student cotdncil, and will be placed in
OF DAILY VISITING TN CITY the hands of the committee. From

Clarence Roeser, '19, managing ed-
itor of The Michigan Daily last year,
is in Ann Arbor today visiting friends.
fhe has sold his share in the newspa-
per at Kenmore, Ohio, and expects to
go into newspaper work in another
Ohio town soon.

these reports, the committee will draw
up its plans, which will be submitted
to the board of trustees, for its ap-
proval.
On this committee are two faculty
men, seven representatives of men's
organizations, and a representative
from the Women's Student council.

Revocation of Letters for After-Ae.
quired Professionalism Only
Suggestion
RULING, 11 PASSED, WOULD
APPLY TO FOOTBALL ALONE
Prof. R. W. Aigler, chairman of the
Board in Control of Athletics, wishing
to correct a prevailing erroneous opin-
ion regarding the revocation of letters
awarded to football men who partici-
pate in professional football after
leaving college, issued the following
statement yesterday afternoon:
Rules Explained
"In the first place Michigan has had
a rule for some time to the effect that
any athlete who participated in pro-
,fessional athletics while in college
<would be disciplined. At a Conference
meeting last December, the question of
professional football was discussed
and two resolutions were passed.
"The first was that no one would be
eligible as official for Conference foot-
ball games or as football coach of a
Conference team, who after this reso-
lution becomes effective, takes part in
professional football either as coach
or player;
"The second was a recommendation
ghat action be taken to revoke the let-
ter awarded to a man for playing foot-
ball on a Varsity team in case he par-
ticipated in professional football after
leaving college.
Football Differs .
"This is merely a suggestion to the
Conference universities and applies
only to football. The reason for this,
is that there is a fundamental dif-
iference between football and other
sports. In professional baseball, for
instance, men do not play professional
ball because of the training and rep-
utation they acquired in college. You
will find that comparatively few col-
lege baseball players become profes-
sionals. Hence it is not a case of
promoting the capitalization of col-
lege teams and reputations.
"In professional football it is dit-
ferent. Football thrives entirely on
college support, and college football
players are sought by professional
teams on account of the training and
reputation they acquired while play-
ing on college elevens. It is purely
a case of the professional game de-
pending on the college game.
(Continued on Page Eight)

For the purpose of making clear its
views in regard to some sentiments
expressed on the campus, the Marine
Corps club drew up the following res-
olution at its meeting last night:
Whereas, a great deal of radical,
anti-American sentiment has been ex-
pressed on or about the campus of
the University of Michigan and in
certain radical clubs and organiza-
tions; sentiments which are repug-
nant to the ideals for which we have
fought, and,
Whereas, we as members of the Un-
ited States Marine Corps club are
wholly and fully patriotic and Amer-
ican,
Be it, therefore, resolved that this
organization go on record as oppos-
ing and condemning any such radical
or anti-American expression as has
been uttered in the past.
C. Fleming, recruiting sergeant
from Detroit, disucssed plans with
the Marine Corps club for an enter-
tainment to be offered by the Roving
,Marines. This exhibition will be held
at 8 o'clock on the evening of March
26, in the high school auditorium.
Music, boxing, moving pictures, and
monologues. will be some of the fea-
tures of the evening.
'FISHER FOLK' IS
LECTURER'S TOPIC
Dr. Wilfred T. Grenfell, Labrador
explorer, author, and missionary, will
give an illustrated lecture on his work
among the fisher folk of the Labrador
coast at 8 o'clock Monday evening in
Hill auditorium.
Through his long service of aid to
the inhabitants of the Labrador and
Newfoundland coasts, Dr. Grenfell has
had conspicuous recognition of his
work both in England and America.
Many universities have sent students
to work with him during the summer
vacations and have purchased boats
for service along the Labrador coasts.
In 1907 he was knighted by King Ed-
ward VII with the order of St. Mi-
chael and St. George.
He has also received recognition
from the American Geographic so-
ciety for valuable contributions to
science.
PENNSYLVANIA ALUMNI BUY
NEW YORK CITY CLUB HOUSE
New York Alumni of Pennsylvania
have just purchased a nine-story
building 11 to 17 East 45th street
for a club. This site, just of Fifth
avenue, is one of the finest in the
clubhouse district and the building it-
self, formerly considered one of the
best apartment houses in the city, is
well suited for the purpose of a club,
containing every improvement, in ad-
dition to smoking, lounging, and bil-
liard rooms.
Oklahoma Dedicates New Building
Dedication services were held early
in March at the University of Okla-
homa officially opening thenew geology
building. All geology students partic-
pated in the exercises, Governor Rob-
lertson of Oklahoma delivering the ad-
dress of the day.

BERLIN DVENTI
.ENDING, DECLLR1
PRESIDENT EBE
SAYS DEMOCRACY IN GERMAI
PUBLIC IS NO DECEP-
TION
TROUBLE CONFINED'1
INDUSTRIAL CENT
General Von Seecht, in Comma
Troops Loyal to State, Is ii
Absolute Control
Paris, March 18.-The genera
uation in Germany is much imp
since yesterday, according to
patches received by the peace de
tion here today. The only s
trouble is now confined to the i
trial centers and the Ruhr v
where the Spartacists are still
venting the re-establishment of t
General Von Seecht in comma
the troops loyal to the Ebert g
ment is in absolute control.
Troops Leave Berlin
Most of the troops of General 1
witz have already left Berlin, th
going this evening. The expect
tack on the capital by several
sand workmen failed to mater
Copenhagen, March 18.-A di
from Stuttgart tells of a proclan
issued by President Ebert an
government. Among the other I
'the proclamation says, "the cri
adventure at Berlin is ending.
futable proof has been given the
world by the struggle of the la
days that democracy in the Ge
republic is no deception and 0
alone has power and knows h
make short shift with even a
'tempted military dictatorship."
Urges End of Strike
The proclamation urges the .
tion of the general strike.
Coblenz, March 18. - An effor
be made to concentrate Ame
now in Germany at some .one
so that all of them who desire to
the country may be able to do s
fa as is known all the America
Germany are safe.
Major-General Allen, comman4
the American forces, was in Pa
day consulting with Hugh Wa
American ambassador, concernx
situation.
LATE WIRE BRIE
Annapolis, Md., March 18.
Maryland house of delegates t
passed thebJones three and on
per cent beer bill, but with a
ments that would make it ope
only if the supreme court rules
concurred action" by sttes r
that each state may fix alcoholic
tents of beverages sold therein
London, March 18.-An unconi
report has reached here that G
Denikine, leader of the anti-B
vist forces in South Russia, has
terms with the Bolsheviki. Th
patch is of diplomatic origin, 1
reached London by a round
way.
Detroit, March 18.--One ma

shot and several others received
or injuries late today when a
ber of aliens, held at Fort v
army post for deportation, atte:
to overpower the guards. Th
rival of military reinforcement
stored order. Four hundred pris
are in custody at the fort.

EDUCATIONAL 'DRY ROT' MUST GO
SAYS BURTON TO MINNEAPOLIS CLUB

"'Dry rot' in our educational insti-E

idea becomes more and more appar-

tutions must be done away with," was
the opinion of Dr. Marion LeRoy Bur-
ton, president-elect of the University
of Michigan, expressed in an address
before the College Women's club of
Minneapolis last Saturday afternoon.
"If we are to avoid chaos we must
reorganize from top to bottom our ed-
ucational processes to meet The prob-
lems of the - day."
Students Need Rousing
Dr. Burton declared that the stu-
dent bodies of the American univer-
sities must be aroused to the respon-
sibilities of the day, and made fami-
liar with the problems we are facing;
that it must be made possible for top-
ics of national importance to be dis-
cussed in the fraternity houses, so-
rority houses and dormitories without
tridicule.
In consideration of the great
amount of work now done in colleges
which ought to be accomplished in thel
high schools, he asserted that the ne-
cessity of adpoting the junior college'

ent.
Superficiality a Vice
"One of the national vices of Amer-
ica is superficiality. Whatever we do,
we are not willing to take the time,
to do the task as we ought.
It has repeatedly been said abroad'
of the men receiving the Rhodes schol-
arships that their education was defi-
cient, lacking preciseness, accuracy
and the power of hard work. These
criticisms, according to Dr. Burton,
are indictments of our educational sys-
tem.
Pleads for Teachers
"Education and democracy are in-
separable, and on a high level of edu-
cation depends the future of our na-
tional institutions. We must stimu-
late our students and train them to
think with thoroughness." -
Dr. Burton made a plea in behalf
of the teachers, saying that greater
emphasis should be placed on the art
of teaching, and better salaries offered
in the profession.

. New York, March 18.-All ye
was demanded by the anthrac
miners at today's conference
sub-committee of miners any
ators appointed to negotiate
wage agreement for the ha
diggers. The conference ad
until tomorrow without any
being taken.
London, March 18. - The I
Standard says it learns that tI
mander of the Turkish tro
Thrace has refused to accept
from Constantinople, has 4re,
the armistice, and proposes tc
lish a governmenit in Adrianop

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