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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 18, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I" M

L

NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
rery morning except Monday during the Univer-
Board in Control of Student Publications. -
BER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ted Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
paper and the local news published therein.
the postofiice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Arbor Press building, Maynard street.
iness. 960; Editorial, 2414.
ons not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
sarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
s of even-ts will be published in The Daily at the
Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
nications will receive no consideration. No man-
eturned unless the writer incloses postage.
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
:ommunications.
u on" notices 'will not be roccived after 8 o'clock
rec:'ding fiscinrtlon.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
>ITOR.................HARRY M.. CAREY
K. Ehlbert Edgar L. Rice
Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
eBrophy Hugh Hitchcock
. H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff'
.-. ..Renaud Sherwood
------.......john I. Dakin
. .....Brewster Campbell
...............Robert C. Angell
ent ....... -...........Marguerite Clark
.Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

age of health is not going to be borne on the wings
of the wind, but will come only with the full co-
operation of those who are to reap its benefits. To
the college student as well as the factory worker his
warning applies with a full force. Here, at the
University of Michigan, it is the work of each stu-
dent to stand behind the great advances in medi-
cine and surgery, and play his part by the guard-
ing of his individual health. Daily exercise, in-
sistence on pure air and wholesome food, and care-
ful avoiding of dirt and infection are a necessity if
the work of the surgeons, physicians, and experi-
mentalists is to bring the better future which the
great Michigan graduate has predicted. It is sim-
ply a very practical matter of personal hygiene and
scientific skill.
"If, as a nation, we advance the time of produc-
tion for each person ten years,". says Dr. Mayo.
"we can well afford to shorten hours of work and
improve living conditions, and we shall be able to
compete with those countries in which long hours
and poor living conditions shorten human life, and
eventually decrease production and increase social
Pnrest."
A SUGGESTION
(By the Womens' Staff)
A little way behind me this morning walked a
girl who had walked a few steps back of me to an
8 o'clock class on Wednesdays and Fridays, for five
months. I slackened my pace, asked her if she
would care to walk along with me. She smiled and
quickly answered, "Gladly. I've gone behind you
so long and never dared to catch up with you. II
did it once with another girl and was too coolly re-
ceived ever to try it again."
Is that what convention is meant to do for us?
Are not the principles of democracy fundamentally
the same for women as for men? What harm if
two girls who see each other daily speak to each
other though they have not met formally? Tomor-
row morning don't walk along alone, but wait for
that girl behind you. The acquaintanceshin should
prove mutually beneficial.
TheTelescope
Again our columns are graced with the liter-
ary efforts of that sterling poet, Jay Greenlief Whit-
tier. In it he manifests the same d.elicate technique
of expression which has charmed his many admir-
ers, and the Telescope feels especially fortunate in
being the medium of expression for this poet whom
we feel has a brilliant future behind him.

GRAHAM'S

ANNUAL BOOK S ALE
Beginning Monday, March 15
THE LATEST BOOKS
AT Phil

In
Fiction
The Scienc
History

es

GREATLY REDUCED
PRICES.

Soc%
Eng

In
losophy
iology
lish
Open Evenings
During Sale

Open Evenings
During Sale

No Deliveries--No Exchanges--Terms Cash
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

p U

Assistants
G.' L. Clarke
Thomas T. Whi ery
do R. W. Wrobleski
4 George Reindel
rt Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt

\inefred Biethan
Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholizer
Edna Apel

0

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960"

MANAGER................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
Classified Ads ....................... Henry- Whiting
........ .Edward Prichs
......... ...Curt P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan

Assistants
F. M. Heath
Sigmund Kunstadter
Harold Lindsay

D. P. oyce
Robt. omrnerville
Arthur L. Glazer,

hing to secure information concerning news for any
ily should see the night editor, who has full charge
: printed that night.
editors for this week will be: Monday
Ehlbert; Tuesday night, George Bro-
esday night, Hugh Hitchcock; Thurs-
Edgar L. Rice; Friday night, Chesser
aturday night, Joseph A. Bernstein.
'HURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1920.
NDALISM IN THE UNION
men should need no warning to pre-
rom maliciously or carelessly damaging
:rty. Pride in possessing one of the fin-
ty buildings the country affords is suf-
ike any thought of marring it seem un-,
-reover, ordinary respect for the rights
tnbers would lead as a matter of course
g from anything detrimental to these
that the Union is barely nearing com-
ew undesirable persons are already at
Little nuisances, such as the tearing
from magazines, furniture defaced by
>andoned cigarette butts, mark their
ough the building; and Union officials
w having to deal with more serious of-
this sort.
such tendencies in the few Union mem-
icline toward them have aroused only
he rest; but that will not serve to deter,
tors-their sort is not easily abashed.
:ans fail there is one way in which to
violation of the rights of all members,
future. The vandal can be disciplined
uly freshman. It is the duty of right-
lents and Union members to prevent
-ages.
G THE "YELLOW AND BLUE"
the precedent established by some of
universities in the East, it has been sug-
.t the "Yellow and Blue" be sung at the
h public performance of the Opera and
ton it is the custom to sing "Old
a grand finale to Triangle plays and
ormances. The students and alumni in
e rise and join in the singing, waving
rchiefs in time with the music.
by singing the "Yellow and Blue,"
a splendid and impressive ending for
appearances of the Opera. It =s one of
llege songs in the country, and one that
cattered over the West rejoice to hear:
ion is surely a good one.

In Turkey, in a valley,
A maiden met McGrail,
And when she asked for an escort
He saw her through the veil.
He took the pretty maiden,
Whose ways were debonair.
A riding in a taxi-cab,
The price he paid was fair.
He took her to the vaudeville
And bought a reserved seat,
And when the dancing juggler came
He hollered out, "Some feet."
He soon bought from his tailor,
Some wedding clothes (they cost a bit),
And when he tried them on one day
He nearly had a fit.
The wedding bells rang gaily,
E'en as in days of old,
And for the bride and bride-groom
'Twas 'the sweetest story ever tolled.
He thought he'd like to build a home,
He'd saved a little mite ;
An agent showed him the city dump,
And said, "This is a site."
He started up a pressing shop,
Did cleaning, wet and dry;
But that this story now should end,
We'll have our hero dye.
"I would say that a girl can live on $6.00 a year.
There are some who can live on less."-- From a
Daily story.
Still no decent self-respecting parent should ex-
pect his daughter to get along on much less than
this while at college.
Dear Noah:-
I have seen how you have helped so many people
untangle their affairs that I am writing to see if you
can help me.
I am so busy with my studies that I don't know
which way to turn. What would you recommend.
Ima Kohed.
The only thing I can see for you to do, Tina, is to
buy a copy of the traffic regulations.
A Handy Recipe
Then she boiled two potatoes which she man-
aged to find in one corner of an empty bag, and
made a ot of coffee.-Moving Picture Stores.
Fanous Closing Lines
"This is perfectly stunning," said the man as the
burglar hit him on the head with a sandbag.
NOAH COUNT.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 1929)
Between Detroit Ann Arbor and -Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6: o a.
mn., and hourly to 9:o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. ni. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of An Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:05 a m., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. m., 10:50
u. m. To Ypsilanti only, 1 1:44p.Min., 1
a. m. and to Saline, change at Y psilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound--:48 a. m and
zz:20 a.r. ,
MARCH
S 9 T W T F S
-7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31.....
Men-Hats are high; your last
season's hat cleaned and re-
blocked into this season's shape,
with a new band, will look like
new and save you five or ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Asked At Random
(Any member of the University,
professor or student, who has a ques-
tion he wishes discussed .in this col-
uain may mail it to the "Asked at
Random" reporter, care of The
Daily.)
Today's question: "Do you think
there are- too many leal clubs at
Michiganr
LeGrand Gaines, '21E, Student
councilman: "Yes, I believe the var-
ious clubs and sectional societies
have, as a whole, no functions to per-
form whatsoever. Some of them should
unite under one head and then if
they combined their efforts in one di-
rection, it would be a great improve-
ment"
Rollin R. Winslow, '20L, vice-presi-
dent of the Michigan Union: "The
advantages of the sectional clubs are
outweighed by theirdisadvantages. I
think occasional functions are all
right; but as a whole the oganizations
are extreme and liable to create see-
tionalism which is- to me, an evil'
Newell E. Lavely, '20H, president
senior homoeopathic class: "I think
that the clubs in Michigan are all
right and that there not too many of
them. They give the fellows an ex-
cellent chance to get acquainted on
the campus..
Walter F. Tschaeche, '20E, business
manager of the Technic: "I do not
think there are too many clubs in
Michigan. In many cases, however,
the members themselves are forget-
ting the reason for their existence.
And it is because these original mo-
tives are not being lived up to at the
present time that I think some chang-
es should be made."
City to Vote on Fair Ground Site
A proposition will be submitted to
the general elections in April to bond
the county for $12,000 for a permanent
fair ground site. The first county
fair in 25 years was held last sum-
mer. If a fair ground is voted, a
county fair will be held each year.
Patronize the Daily Advertisers.
Hear Dr. Dinger Sun-
day at Church of
Christ S. University.
First

Baptist Church
Huron St., below State
JOHN MASON WELLS,
Minister
HOWARD R. CHAPMAN,
Minister of University Students
At the 10:30 ser~ice Mr. Wells
will give the first of two ser-
mons based on Pres.-Elect
Burton's book, "Our Intellec-
tual Attitude in an Age of Cri-
ticism."

_ _

K

. ..... ,...y .... .

. i

'
.
. _

ii
'
E. S.-. ' 4,-.

.illlllillilllllltlltllllllllllll ll ll t tllll1111tU ui1 1 11111011UI 1111111111 111111111
BOOKS NOW ON HAND
c Ziwet's Theoretical Mechanics - $4. 0
Ripley's Railway Problems - $3.00
Jones' The Principles of Citizenship - $1.25
= Salisbury, Barrows and Tower- Geog. $1.80 y
Pargment's Exercises Francais - $.80
= Duncan's Commercial Research - $2.25
Tapper and Others'- Advertisling - 53.00
Conklin's Heredity - - $2.00
Ketchum's Structural Handbook - $6.00
Gray's Anatomy - . .$8.00
UNIVERSITY
VvA,0BOOKSTORES
tl l ll llilllll l 1 :IIt111 IIIlillttltlll t lfl 1tillllllitlitl lilli1111111111111111
THE AMERICAN CIGAR STORE
Billiards and Pocket Billiards
Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobaccos, Candies, Soft Drinks, Magazines
Daily and Sunday Papers.
514 E. WILLIAM STREET
(One block from Campus)
SPECIAL CUT PRICES ON CIGARS, CIGARETTES, & TOBACCOS

f

1

cF'TF'ORM
lothes forYouni~t

NEW STYLES IN FINE.

Suits

an'd.

Fop

Coats

I

Bright Spring days call for a change of rai-
ment and this store is ready to supply your
needs.
Just Received New
Stocks From Chicago
so that your selection can be easily
made and our policy,
10 Per Cent Reduction,

4GTHENING LIFE

J. Mayo, '83M, elder of the famous
who estabished at Rochest-er, Minn.,
ndation for Medical Education and
es a very startling statement, in" the
>er of the North American Review,
esies: "With present knowledge and
ons, fifteen years more.- might be
:e of man in this country within the
ars. It is certain that ten years will
te most productive age from the
idustry, and will greatly aid in main-
ition as the mdAt productive nation."
>aher good things, Dr. Mayo's golden

means a big saving right at the com-
mencement of the season.

March 21
"Our Intellectual Attitude."
March 2$
"What the Modern Christian Be-
ieves."

Walk a few Steps ad Save Dollars
110 E. Liberty St. Between Main St. and 4th Ave.

11

p.' -I

r

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