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March 18, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-18

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IR AND, CONTINUED
COLD TODAY

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ASSOCIATE
PRESS
lAY AND NIGHT I
SERVICE

No. 120. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1920. PRICE THREE

ENT COUNCIL
S TO PRESENT
ERGENCY PLEA

UNIVERSITY RIFLE CLUB IS NEW
CONSIDERATION OF FACUL'TY MEN

ENTS' ACTION IN
PETITION CAUSES
NOVE

TABLING
NEW

TO ASK INITIATION
CHANGE IN SOCIETIES

Certain Organizations Will Be
quested to Abolish Undue
Physical Violenoe

Re. I

Because of the action of the Regents
in tabling the Student council peti-
tion asking that Hill auditorium be
opened to political speakers, it was
decided at the council meeting last
night to present an emergency peti-
tion to the Regents. This petition will
be drawn up following a consultation
of the council committee with Pres-
ident Harry B. Hutchins, to be held
the first of next weti,.
Profiteering Discussed
The question of profiteering by Ann
Arbor merchants catering to student
trade was brought up and discussed.
A committee was appointed to in-
vestigate all known cases of prof-
iteering, and to make reports on such
cases at the next council meeting.
It was deci.ded to send a letter to
campus organizations and 'conor so-
cieties which have made a practice of
having initiations involving undue
physical violence, requesting that
these societies and organizations elim-'
inate a certain amount of such vio-
lence. This action originated with
the Senate committee on student af-
fairs, and was approved by the coun-
Oil.
Swear in New Noembers
Four new members were sworn in
at the meeting, Frank L. Walter3,
'21L, Donald Porter, '21, Harry D.
Ketchum, Grad, and LaWrence D.
JArke, '20Qj. .
CAlls FOR 'FALL BUDGETS
Sec. Smith Asks That Expense Drafts
of Colleges Be ubmitted
Budgets ,of the various colleges on
th campus for next. year have been
called for by Secretary Shirley W.
Smith, t9 be in not later than March
20. These tentative drafts of expenses
will probably be submitted to the Re-
gents at their meeting next week in.
order that sufficient funds may be
pirovided for running the University
next'fall.
Heads of the departments have for
the last few days been conferring
with Dean John R, Effinger, concern-
ing the budgets of the departments in
the literary college. Consd4rabie
work is invoved during the coming
week in estimating, the expenses.
FERRIS MEN WILL'
BANQUET IN YPSI
A banquet to which all Ferris In-
stitute members are invited is to be
given at 8 o'clock eastern time Sat-
urday evening in Ypsilanti Normal
school gymnasium.
The banquet is In charge of Henry]
C. Deveraux, president of 'the Ferris
Institute club, who has invited all
Antg Arbor members to be present.
Ex-Gov. t Woodbridge N. Ferris and
Mr. Thomas Carlyle, both members of1
the FerriInstitute faculty, will speak?
on matters of interest to all membersa
from the University.
Those attending ,from Ann Arbort
will leave here on the 6:10 interur-7
ban and should notify either Mar-
guerite Clark, 21, at 2730, or Henry
Devereaux, =22, at 1629-J.
BALL PLAYING IN STREETS
PROHIBITED BY ORDINANCE

Profs. Wilson and Ryden Together
With 1. 0. T. C. Offi rs :Back Plan
Plans are under consideration for
the formation of a University Rifle
club, open to any man in the Uni-
versity who can shoot. In the inter-
ests of this plan 'a meeting will be
held at 7:30 o'clock Friday evening,
in room 445 of the Engineering build-
ing.
Profs. C. E. Wilson, of the mechan-
ical engineering department, and J.
R. Hayden, of the polticial science
department, together with Captain
Arthur and Captain Lucas, professors
of military science and tactics, are ac-
tively interested in the plan. Such a
club has not existed in the Univer-
sity for several years.
Hope to Form Teams
If sufficient interest is shown in the
formation of this club, several teams
will be formed and competitive match-
es held. In regard to equipment there
is now in the possession of the Ath-
JOHNSON IRS 1IEW ON
POLITICAL DISCUSSIONS
COLLEGE STUDENTS MOULDERS
OF PUBLIC OPINIO IN
' FUTURE
"I don't want to be quoted as to the
opening of any specific hall for po-
litical discussion," said Senator John-
son when informed of the present rul-
ing which prohibits political discus-
sion in Hill auditorium, "but opilege
students will mould public opinion in
the future and should make a careful
study of politics while in school it
they are to make efficient leaders to-
morrow.
"I will put the League of Nations
in the campaign this fall if it is not
in the platform of a party," said the
senator when being interviewed Tues-
day afternoon.
In regard to William H. Taft
statement that the delay of the rati-
fication of the Peace treaty is indi-
rectly related to the political revolt
in Germany, the Californian said,
"Nonsense, it had nothing to do
with it.
"The college vote on the Peace treaty
was only the vote of one class and so
cannot be taken as the representativE
vote of the nation," he said.
When asked his opinon if the Con-
stitution is in effect now, he replied,
"Yes, but the bill of rights is Seri-
ously impaired. I look for a quick re-
tturn to normal legislation."
ALL-FRESH TRACK MEN TO BE
AWARDED NUMERAL SWEATERS
athletie Association Revises Consi-
tution; Changes Unanounie-
Blue jerseys with yellow numerals
will be awarded to the All-fresh track
team of '22, according to a decision ofs
the board of directors of the AthleticI
association at its meeting yesterday
afternoon.
The constitution and by-laws of theI
Athletic association are being revised,.
but none of the changes will be an-f
nounced until they have been com-
pleted.
FREEDOM OF POLITICAL TALKSt
TOPC OF CLUB'S RESOLUTIONF

letic association several excellent i,
door rifles. These really belong to the
old Rifle club and will probably be
available for those who wish to do
indoor shooting, according to Profes-
sor Wilson.
In addition to this equipment, R.
O. T. C. officers anticipate that it will
be possible to secure sufficient rifles
and ammunition from the govern-
ment. If not, it wil at least be possi-
ble to secure necessary additional am-
munition at a low rate..
To Interest Military Men
It is anticipated that considerable
interest will be shown by ex-service
men, and organizations such as naval
militia, Marine club, and some 180
members of the R. O. T. C. units, who
will automatically become members
of such a club. Membership, however,
is not limited to these men, but any-
one interested is urged to be present
at the meeting.
Professor Wilson, and Captains
Arthur and Lucas will assist in the
organization and instruction 'of the
club although Captains Arthur and
Lucas will do so unoficially,
Prof. Wilson Former Captain
Professor Wilson captained the
Michigan state team at Caldwell, N.
J T., during the last national matches,
and in now president qf the M\tichigan
State Rifle association.
EXTENDED GER MAN
TROUBLE PROBABLE1

Cancellation Of
f-Hop (Over-flow
Dance Necessary
Lack of sufficient interest in the
Union over-flow dance from the J-Hop
has resulted in the dance being can-
celled by Union authorities.
Only a small number of men bought
tickets.
Because of the large expense nec-
essary in undertaking this plan, to-
gether with the fact that interest
centered in the J-Hop rather than
the Union dance as a second choice, it
was stated by Mr. Donovan that the
original plans will not be carried
through.
Refunds are being made on tickets
purchased at an earlier date.
ibWraryJiMedical
Room Will Open.

WHO WILL BE' THERE
Can you imagine the effect on
an athlete when, just before a
race, he glances toward the
bleachers and sees row after
row of his friends and . class-
mates? As he sees each one
watching him expectantly, hop-
ing that he will break the tape
ahead of the others, doesn't he
grit his teeth and speed faster,
feeling that he has the interest
and support of so many behind
him? Certainly he does.
The track meet at Evanston
begins tomorrow night and the.
finals are held Saturday. Ought
not every Michigan man that
can possibly get to the meet be
there, cheering the track men
on to victory? .

ALLIES OCCUPY CONSTANTINOPLE1
HAENO INTENTION OF LESSENIN PWRO UTN g,'l

I

Safety and Order Assured;
Assumed of Posts, Tlegra
Telephones
(By Associated Press)

4

GENERAL SIR GEORGE MILI
BRITISH ARMY HEADS
EXPEDITION
FLEET COVERS FORC
AS LANDING IS M)

All Foreign Misters Refrafin
Intercourse with Rapp
Faction

froi

SOVIET REPUBLIC PROCLAIMED
AT EISELBEN, SAYS REPORT
(By Associated. Press)
Paris, March 17.-Information re-
ceived at the French foreign office in-
dicates that the danger of an extended
conflict between the workmen and
military in Germany is becoMing more
and more probable. The independent
socialists have sent an ultimatum to
Kapp to withdraw his forces within
24 hours, otherwise they would maiel
to Berlin.
Offliical advices from Berlin say that
all the foreign missions have refrain-
ed from any intercourse with the Kapp
faction. All Americans in Berlin are
declared to be safe;
CABINET MEETS
Stuttgart, March 17.-The cabinet
met Tuesday afternoon, President
Ebert presiding. The cabinet decided
there should be no question cf nego-
-tiations with Kapp and demanded
that he withdraw immediately with his
troops.
FIGHTING IMPENDS
Copenhagen, March 17.-A telegram
from Stuttgart says that according to
absolutely reliable news from Berlin,
very heavy fighting is impending
there.
A report receive4 from Jera says the
Kapp troops there have been defeat-
ed and disarmed after sanguinary
fighting.
A Berlin dispatch says a soviet re-
public has been proclaimed in Eisel-
ben. Fighting is reported at Eldereld.
one of the most important industrial
towns of Germany, between troops
and communists in which the latter
were defeated. About 1,000 of the
communists are said to have been
driven into the Allied occupied ter-
ritory and disarmed by the British.

Work on the medical reading room
in the library is nearing cmpletion
and it is expected that only 10 more
days will be required before the room
will be ready for use.
The room has pigeon holes around
the walls for magazines, while there
are a few shelves to provide for ref-
erence books that are in great de-
mand. Directly behind and conven-
ient to the reading room are the
stacks of medical books. In addition
to the catalogue in the delivery corri-
dor, ,a special medical catalogue will,
be placed in this room.
Opening off the medical . reading
room are two smaller rooms for the
medical faculties,, one for the homoe-
opaths and the other for the allo-
paths.
There are some 450important medi-
eal magazines to which the library
subscribes. The library prefers to get
a good collection of medical maga-
zines instead of books due to the fact
that the majority of articles in this
science are first printed in maga-
zines.
For this purpose the library spends
approximately $3,000 annually, but
because many European publications
were discontinued during the war,
only $1,500 was spent last year.
MUTITATES UNION
DRAPERIES; CAUGHT
Identity of Offender Not Yet Revealed;
to Wait Action of Board
A'tion was taken by the Union
house committee at its last meeting
which resulted in a recommendation
to the Board of Directors that the stu-
dent guilty of mutilating draperies
on the second floor corridor of the
Union some months ago be suspended
from Union membership for a period
of one year.
His identity was only recently es-
tablished and due to the fact that this
action and recommendation are sub-
ject to the approval of the hoard of
Directors, his name has been with-
held from publication,
ENGLAND NOT BANKRUPT, PROF.
FRIDAY SAYS, OF STATEMENT
Inadequate Data and Fallacious Rea-
soning Responsible for
Belief

CMEC U TTACHE3
ITELS OF ASITIC LFE
MR. J. Xl. ARNOLD RECOMMENDS
CHAIR OF CHINESE IN
UNIVERSITY
Advocating a chair for the teaching
of. Chinese in the University, Mr. Ju-
lian H. Arnold, commercial attache t
China from the United States, . dis-
cussed many phases of Chinese life
before a large number of business
administration students last night in
the Economics building.
Ignorance Appalling
"There is an appalling ignorance
today on the part of Americans, espe-
cially university students, about things
Chinese," said Mr. Arnold. He con-.
tended that America is naturally more
of an Asiatic power than European,
as this country has more Pacifl coast
line than any other nation on the
globe.
"China and Asia have to olfer great
opportunities for trade. They give
.one of the most promising fields for
commercial work in the world today,
due to large homogeneous population
and almost unlimited supplies of nat-
ural resources," Mr. Arnold stated in
his ,talk.
Mental Stagnation Old
He said that the mental stagnation
of the Chinese people dated back a
thousand years and was due primari-
ly to the peculiar system of educa-
tion which was in effect until 1905.
Under the old custom the Chinese stu-
dents were interested above, every-
thing else in the memory of their an-
cestors. This was the cause of their
backwardness and slowness to adopt
new ideas.
There are at present 1,500 Chinese
students in the American universi-
ties studying engineering and other
practical courses, intending to use
their knowledge in developng the
great Asiatic state.
Lack of Spirit Apparent
Mr. Arnold stated that when he first
took up the work in China he noticed
an almost utter lack of a national
spirit. This situation caused the out-
brerZ of the students' strike in Shang-
hai which was an attempt on the part
of, the students to spread the feeling
of nationalism in the face of hostile
aggregation of foreign powers.
Examinations will be held this
spring for those students who con-
template consular work of this na-
,ture. Mr. Arnold urged that Michi-
gan men take these examinations.
Princeton, Yale, Harvard, Oberlin, and
Pennsylvania are' already actively in-
terested in the work and he urges that
Michigan be represented. The posi-
tions pay from $3,000 to $9,000.
Hold Dinner at Union
Mr. Arnold has been in the consular
work for e past 18 years and is,
known as an authority on economicr
conditions of China. A dinner was
given for him at the Unin early in
the evening by several professors of
the Economics department and a rep-
resentation ,of the Commerce club.

Constantinople, Marph 17.-Constar
tinople was occupied this morning I
allied forces under Gen, Sir Geor
Milne of the British army. This on
looked for military demonstration I
the Allies against Turkey was ca
ried out with only one untoward ha:
pening, a serious clash at the Wi
Office where the Turks resisted t1
Allied troops.
An exchange of shots resulted".
which several punjabi of the Brith
East Indian forces and a few of t
Turks were killed.
Darkness Brings Calm
The excitement caused by the mov
ment quieted down before ,darkned
which brought absolute calm.
The landing of the forces ('t occi
pation was carried out under the gui
of the formidable Allied fleet ancho
ed in the Bosphorus.
The population showed 'little ala
nor wa's there any sign of panic.
Arrests Made
Comprehensive military and navy
plans had been made for carrying o
the Allied measures and precautio
ary steps taken. Last night a nut
ber of Turks and other persons w
were regarded as possible disturbe'
of the peace were arrested, includi
the commander of the 10th Turkish d
vision.
The Allies have occupied the mini
try of war and navy and have assu
ed control of posts, telegraphs at
telephones, which have been tempo
arily suspended. Shipping also ih
been suspended.
Safety Assured
The Allied high commissioner h
issued a statement declaring that t
Allies have no intention of destro:
ing the authority of the sultan bI
wish to strengthen his power. It a
so says the Allies will adhere to the
intention not to deprive the Turks c
Constantinople but that they may
compelled to modify their decision
massacres and disorder continue.
The Allies are declared to belle
they have provided amply for 't
maintenance of security and order i
Constantinople, and consider it quea
tionable whether even the so calle
Nationalist forces in Anatolia are j
a position to attempt anything ser
ous.
GYTM WORK ENDS APRIL
Rest of Program to be Six Lecture
Given by Health Department
Practical work in the, freshma
gymnasium classes will end with t:
beginning of the spring recess,' Apr
9, and six lectures under the supe
vision of the Health service will con
stitute the remainder of the gymna
lum program. Attendance at the
lectures is compulsory and absent
from them will cause students to los
their gymnasium credit.
Engineers who failed to attend th
lectures given in the engineering co
lege on hygiene may make up thei
absences by being present at' the
lectures in the gymnasium.
REWARD OF $25 OFFERED FOR
ARREST OF CAMPUS THIEVE
A 'reward of $25 is offered by th
building and grounds department f
information leading to the arrest. an
conviction of anyone committin
theft in the buildings under the juris
diction of the University.
This action has been.taken becaue

of the #xtensive theft of wearing ap
parel and other articles of v6lu
throughout the University buildings.

A demand for the opening of Hill
auditorium to' poltiical speakers was
the gist-of a resolution passed by the
Educational club last night at their
meeting in the Union.
Following this Mr. Stewart R. Cur-
tis, of the research department of the
Detroit public schools and former in-
structor here, delivered an address on
"The Project Method in Education."
Special Boxing Club Meeting Tonight
Final decision on the nights for in-
struction by Ted Sullivan, instructor
of theaDetroit Athletic club, will be
made at a special meeting of the Box-
ing club at 7:15 o'clock tonight in the
reading room of the Union.
Government Agents Robbed,
Seattle, Wash., March 17. - Two
mas'3d men early today herd up the
i-.Lernal revenue office here and es-
caped with $20,000,

PROFESSORS PLAN TO ATTEND
MODERN LANGUAGE MEETING
Many professors in the University
are planning to attend the combined
meeting of the Modern Language asso-
ciation on March 29, 30, and 31 at
Columbus. This ise the national meet-
ing of the association and it is held
once every four years.
Prof. Samuel Mgore of the English
department and Prof. J. J. Cheskis of
the modern language department of
the engineering school are on the pro-
gram of the meeting. Prof. A. G.
Canfield, of the romance langauge
department, and Prof. F. N. Scott of
the rhetoric department expect to at-
tend the meeting.

"Inadequate data and fallacious rea-
soning is the cause of such a remark
as 'England is bankrupt,' which was
made by Mr. Curran of Detroit be-
fore the Johnson-for-President club in
Lane hall last Thursday night," said
Prof. David Friday of the Economics
department when asked his opinion on
the matter.
"Although England . owes much
money, it is fully covered by money
which is owed to her by other nations.
Much of her debt is owing to her own.
people, which is similar to taking
money out of one pocket and putting
it in another," said Professor Friday.
Prof. Whipple to Address Teachers
Prof. Guy M. Whipple of the edu-
cation department will be among the
chief -speakers at the spring institute
of the Saginaw county teachers to be
held March 26 in Saginaw. His topic
is not yet announced.
Dr. Preston Bradley, of Chicago,
'nationally known as, the result of his
work on the platform, will also speak,
at the institute.

chief

of police has issued the
dinances whiq are now
Ball playing in public
ys, and lawn extensions
I; bull dogs should be
the year around; ma-
d not be driven without
:ense; bicycles should not

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