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March 13, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E.

.L NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
eery, morning except Monday during the Univer-
Board in Control of Student Publications.
dBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
tall news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
paper and the local news published therein.
the postoffice at 'Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
n by carrier or mail, $3.50.
n Arbor Press building, Maynard street.
iiiness, 96o; Editorial. 2414.
tins not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
essarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
:es of events will be published in The Daily at the
e Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
lunications will receive no consideration. No man-
returned unless the writer incloses postage.
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
DITOR.....................HARRY M. CAREY
K. Ehlbert Edgar L. Rice
L Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
se Brophy Hugh Hitchcock
A. Shinkman
.....H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
......Renaud Sherwood
..... -,John I. Dakin
.Brewster Campbell
.....Robert C. Angell
tment....T msAdm , Marguerite Clark
........... ThmasAdams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Assistants
G. E. Clarke
ThomasvJ. Whinery
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
MVinnie Muskatt;,

Winefred $i&han
Robert D. Sage
M on Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
:ANAGER..................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
..IOrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
assified Ads......................Henry Whiting
.................. ..... ...Edward Priehs
...................Curt P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan

Assistants .
F. M. Heath
Sigmund Kunstadter
Harold Lindsay

D.bP. Joyce
Rt.m mlerville
Arthur L. 'Glazer .

MOD

ncernhig news for any
>r, who has full charge

.t.

night editors for this week will be: Monday
0dgar L. Rice; Tuesday .night, Mark Ehl-
Vednesday night, George Brophy; Thuzsday
Hugh Hitchcock; Friday,. night, C. M.
11; Saturday night, Joseph A. Bernstein.
SATURDAY, MARCH 13, 1920.'
es fox the "What's Going On" coumn will
rece ved after 8 o'clock on the night preced-
date of issue. -This rule will go into effect
AN "M" MAN MINUS THE M
mo.ment advocating that an athlete's "M"
n from him if he should engage in any pro -
it sport after graduating from the Univer-
indeed one for serious thought. -The ques-
s brought- before the conference some time
t laid on the table for further considera-
dea of the movement was that, as soon .a s
duate who had won his letter in the Uni-
should participate in professional athletics,
d of Control would simply state that he was
er entitled to the; privilege of wearing the
Such a plan, however, would neither change
le of the "M" nor solve the problem of do-
y with professional sports. y
e a man is a student of the University, he
be barred from playing as a professional.
r graduation, an "M" man should be free to
is own decision as to the of work he is to
in, without thought of being deprived of
:ge honors. Professional sports have their
The national game of baseball, as exempli-.
he National and American leagues, is grow-
>opularity each year, and surely it'has not
nted because of its professionalism. ,
gan gives her block lett'ers to athletes as a
oai merit. It is an honor well earned, and
ch can never, or should never be rescinded.
n a man' who has done good' work in the
1ty alter it by playing as a professional after
on? His record here still remains the same
reward should still be just as great. Let
n give rewards to those that deserve them,
e as her slogan "Once an " man always
WCOGNITION FOR MR. IMMEI. -
gan's position in the oratorical field, as well
bility of one of its best liked teachers, was
ed this week when Mr. Ray K. Immel of
ory department ryas honored by election as
:r o.f the National Association of Teachers
:h, and as business manager o its publica-
nly the legal profession, but many phases of
fife today, call for men able to express
>ughts clearly and forcibly, and to convince
> their viewpoint. Many alumni, aided in
>fessional relations by effective training in
peaking at Michigan, will bear grateful tes-
.o the work of Mr. Immel and his associ-
id Michigan's debating reputation is a sure
n of their efficiency in the competitive side
rical training.
MRS. FISKE AND FURS
night ago Mrs. Eiske expressed' herself
rorly~ here upon the subject of wearing
h' famos actress was indignant that the

lives of so many animals should be sacrificed to
provide adornment for women-for she considers
ornament, rather than wa'rmth, to be the primary
function of the fur coat in this tlimate.
A striking sidelight on Mrs. Fiske's views is af-
forded by the remark recently mae by a University
student. "There are a half millio-n dollas worth
of furs on Michigan campus," he said. He was bas-
ing his estimate upon actual statistics. By count
there are approximately coo fur coats belonging-to
wolrien of the" University. The price of these coats
varies from $150 to $1,200. Etriking an average
and adding the cost of the hundreds of valuable
sets of furs found in the University, it can readily
be seen that the half million dollar estimate is no ex-
.aggeration.
Mrs. Fiske is undoubtedly correct in her belief
that appeardnce is the first consideration in wearing
furs. Her views, as she herself admits, are radi-
cal; but they bring to mind the fact that, after all,
the fur coat is a highly non-essentiaf article.
DEMAND FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGES
Probably never before in te history of this coun-
try has the study of foreign languages assumed
such importance and opened so many opportunities
foi Americans in commercial, lines. The resump-
tion of world trade, the close relationship lying be-
tween the allied nations following the wa and the
growing extent of communication with the South
/ American countries' are resulting in an enormous
demand for men and women proficient in all foreign
languages.
That this fact is being widely realized is shown
by the gteatly increased numbers specializing in
foreig'i anguages in the schools throughout the
#country and by the institution,-by many, of the
great nmnufacturing concerns of schools for train-
ing men to act as salesmen in other lands.
Not only does this increased need of linguists
create a demand for met) and women in capacities
of salesmen, consular agents, interpreters and the
like, but it opens up a field for a large corps of
teachers to train the. many students' studying for
these positions. There is, at present, a general short-
age of such teachers.
With the many opportunities offered- in teaching
and i holding imnportant positions wherein the need
of a knowledge of a foreign tongue is of primary
importance, there shbuld be an added impetus for
kuniversity students acquiring profiicency in one or
more of these languages.
The Telescope
An Epitph
Poor May and Gert and June,
Here they le at rest;
They came down the campus
A walkin' three areast.
Why He Died zith His Boots On
Prof. in econgmics-Hard times always come in
cycles.
Bright stude-Would you say that was a cycle-
logical fact?.
Dear Noah: -
Is it true that women are to have trouser pockets
into which they can put their hands? Mabell.
Married men have these pockets already, Ma-
belle.
, Mlle. Trete Emruffe, the celebrated Russian
dancer, gives a few hints which those intending to
attend the J-Hop.should find invaluable.
LESSON I
Having arrived at the ball room, entice the girl
out onto the floor by some diplomatic remark such
as, "Well, we may as well begin and have this thing
over with." Then grasp her gently but firmly
around the waist. (Don't be too bashful about this,
since a gentleman always gives a lady the benefit of
a doubt and assumes that she is used to this proce-

dure.)
Taking care not to let the music distract your
attention, walk briskly forward pushing the girl in
front of you. If you see that most of the couples
are in step with the music always do just the oppo-
site. This stamps you at once as an independent
type, a man who is not influenced by the action of
others. .
In startir;, swing the right foot forward, mili-
tary fashion, about 40 inches. Your partner will
probably only step half that far but don't let a minor
detail like that bother you; she must be taught that
you are-at all times doing the leading. If the couple
you almost trip manages to regain their balance
without actually sitting down on the floor, don't be
discouraged. You can't be expected to succeed
every time and besides practice along these lines
will do wonders.
Above all things keep up a running-fire of conver-
sation. If it happens that you are considerably
taller than your companion a shoulder pad on which
she can rest her head is found-to be very restful.
Watch the chaperone very closely and if she doesn't
frown more than three times at you during the
course of the dance you know at once that you've
forgotten the cheek-to-cheek posture or something
of equal importance. J. W. K.
Famous Closing Lines
"I don't follow the thread of your discourse," he
said when he saw she was trying to string him.
NOAH COUNT.

RATWO

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, iz91)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern. Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:to a.
,n., and hourly to 9:0 p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:os a. in., 9:05 a.
in. and every two hours to 9:o5. p. in., t0:50
v. tn. To Ypsilanti only, ir:4 p. in., x:1o
a. im. and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound--7:48 a. in. and'
T2:20 a. m.
Open NeV Study
Room In Library
The history and political science
reading room for graduate students
on the east side of the fourth floor of
the Librairy is now open for use.
Although the room is only partial-
ly equipped, it has some 500 bookw
and enough tables to accommodate 40
readers. The books are arranged by
courses and are on open shelves so
that no slip is necessary. No books
cain be taken from the rooi.
Books in seminary and graduate
courses of all the professors in his-
tory and political science will be
kept in this room. While the room is
designed, primarily for graduate stu-
dents taking history and political sci-
ence, it will be open to undergraduates
taking advanced courses in these sub-
jects.
The room is in charge of Mr. -Earl
Ketcham o the Library staff, and will
be open from 8 to 12 o'clock in the
morning and from 1 to 10 o'clock in
the afternoon and evening.
FRED E. STEINBACH RECEIVES
SCANDINATIAN 3'FELLOWSHIP
Fred E. Steinbach, '19E; has been
awarded one of the fellowships es-
tablished by the American-Scandinav-
ian foundation of New York city and
is now studying in Sweden.
Each year 20 men receive these' fel-
lowships fromAmerica lnd are sent to
Scandinavian countries to study, ten
to Sweden, five to Norwary, and five
to Denmark. An equal number of men
from these countries are sent to Am-
erica.. The scholarships.'amount to
$1,000 a year, and in some cases to
$1,200..
Applications for the 1920-1921 fel-
lowships must be filed before April 1,
at the office of the foundation at 25
West 45th street, New York. 'Success-
ful candidates will sail in early sum-
mer in order to allow them several
weeks to become accustomed to the
language and customs of the coun-
tries.

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Pargnient's
Exercises Francais
== Bleyer's
Special Features Articles
Castle's
Geneties and Eugenics
- -
UHm nU 9n UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES
I illillifiltli iltilir 1 11t 11111 11uu11111 1111'11111 1111i 111tu 11iH i 1illillln
ONE REASON WHY PEOPLE
OF ANN ARBOR ASK FOR-
I T S P UIRA
Dinners. Lunches Confectionery
Ice Cream, DeliCous Sodas
- We Make our own Ice Cream
Orders solicited from Fraternities and
Sororities. 218 S. Main Phone 166
THE AMERICAN CIGAR STORE
Billiards and Pocket Billiards-
Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobaccos, CanMies, Soft Drinks, Magazines
Daily and Sun day Papers.
514 E. WILLIAM STREET
(One block from Campus)
SPECIAL CUT PRICES ON CIGARS, CIGARETTESj & TOBACCOS

Just

Received
Johnson and VanMetre
Railway Transportation

h

[A

M.19

S

STORES

-

-

. i .
r i

i

f -
I
4 .
l,
Ir
21

THE FIRST SPRING
SUITS AND
TOP COATS
Newest Colorings and
Patterns
Hart, Schaffner &rlarx
High-Line Styles

In Single and Double-Breasted Models-
Values that are Supreme. Style and as-
sortment in great Variety.

Reue Con lin liege! Co.

q

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