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March 13, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-13

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!JJNOME vWHAT
IMER TODAY

L

rr SWl

:43A6r
tlx

AY PRESS
Y AND NIGHT
SERVICE

No. 116.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 13, 1920.

PRICE THREE

AN ROMIHGN ATRA.MRC-3 90.pT , ,TT~~

,{
r

if FHARRELL
TAGS CLASH
EET TONIGHTI

B-V.D,. DANCE DATE
A SET FOR APRIL

23I

Barristers, Vulcans, and Druids will
give their annual B. V. D. dance the
first Friday after vacation, April 23,
according to an announcement made
by the committee in charge of the af-
fair.
Barbour gymnasium is to be the
scene of the party and tentative plans
are being worked out by the joint
committee which will call for unus-
ual features in the way of music, pro-

STUDENTS OBJECT
TO STATEME NTS
AT -"48"_ MEE[TiNG6
INTERRUPT SPEAKER WITH HISS-
ES AND STAMPING OF
FEET

MAROONS HOPE TO REVENGE
NUMEROUS PAST DE-
FEATS
CLOSE SCORE EXPECTED;
CHICAGO SQUAD STRONG
Visitors Especially Dangerous in Dist-
anees; Higgins a Star Shot
Putter

grams;,

,. _

entertainment .and

decors- MELINDAiALEXANDER'S

tions.
The price of the tickets for the af-
fair, which .will be limited strictly to

CHARGES UNANSWERED
Many Ex-Service Men Attend Meet-
ing of Committee of "Forty.
Eigh

PLAN DINNER. FOR
SENATOR JOHNSON
The Johnson-for-President club will
hold a reception next Tuesday after-
noon in the Union which will be fol-
lowed by a dinner in the senator's
honor. Senator Johnson opens his
campaign in Michigan in Detroit on
Monday, speaks to Jackson Tuesday
noon and proceeds from there to Ann
Arbor.
Mr. Edward Curran, Detroit manu-
facturer, talked to the members of the
Johnson-for-PresidentcalbThursday
evening at Lane hail. During his
speech he'made the following state-
ments, "Lowden's candidacy is not
sincere, he is but the stalkirg horse
for Wood; Wood has been accustom-
ed to click his heels and yalute all
his life; Johnson has been trained
to the law and is a diplomat; let us
have an American in the White
House whom we know; Senator John-
son is a constructive man of high
ideals."
UNION SERV1IS
LIMITE' D TO HOUR

NO

Chicago and Michigan will clash in'
their annual indoor track meet at 8
o'clock tonight in Waterman gymnas-
ium. The wits and ability of Coach
Farrell will oppose those of Coachj
Stagg. Captain Carl Johnson will
match his men against the men of
Captain Speer. A meet of the keenest
competition and the highest interest
is certain to result.
Coach Stagg will bring with him a
squad of some 28 men, against which'
a team of 30 will take the floor for
the Varsity. Chicago is coming here
with the intention of turning the tables
of the last two. years and avenging the
numerous defeats which Michigan has
administered to Maroon cinder squads.
An equal determination to repeat its
former victories has been apparent
during the practice of the week among
the members of the Varsity squad and
Coach Farrell is satisfied that his
men will acquit themselves in a re-
spectable fashion.
Eleven Events
Competition will be held 'in 11 dif-
ferent events, including-an eight lap
relay race in which each man will run
two laps. The program contains the
following events: 50 yard dash, 60
yard high hurdles, 65 yard low hurdl-
es, 440. yard dash, 880 yard run, mile
run, two- mile run, high jump, pole
vault, shot put, and relay race.
Whether bach team will be limited
to four men in each event has not yet
been determined.
Chicago is strong in the distances
and it has a weight man who is the
undisputed champion in the Confer-
ence, Michigan is strong * the floor
events, particularly in the hurdles,
pole vault, dashes, and high jump.
For the two mile, Coach Stagg has,
three good men in Otis, Bowers, and
Haskins Moore. Steve is lacking in
good men for the event but Schlmniel,
Mosher, and Penberthy can be counted
on to offer all that they have.
(Continued on Page Three)

FEASIBLE PLAN OFFER
WILL CONTINUE PRESENT
SYSTEM

BOARD Of REGENTS TABLES STUDENT
COUNCIL. PETITION FOR POL ITI CA
DISCUSSIONS IN HilL AUDITORIL

the members of the three societies,
has not been determined by the com-
mittee. Invitations are being ex ended
to inactive as well as active members.
TO AYdPLANS FOR0
Committee Will Outline Plan for Am.
erica's Participaton in,
Games

FIFTEEN SPORT ASSOCIATIONS
TO SEND REPRESENTATIVES
IBy Associated Press)
New York, March 12:-The greatest
gathering of athletic authorities ever
assembled in this city will convene
here tomorrow afternoon to formally
consider, plans and arrangements for
the formation of the American Olym-
pic team which will represent the Un-
ited States in the Olympic games at
Antwerp next summer.
Fifteen Associations Represented
Fifteen sport associations will have
one or more delegates in addition to
scores of officers and committeemen
from the international and American
Olympic committees and the Amateur
Athletic union.
To Make Final Plans
The entire program for America's
participation in the international
games will be outlined. Arrange-
ments will be made for financing, by
private and public suibscriptions, the
transportation of the 100 or more ath-
letes, who will be selected by var-
ious trial tests and numerous com-
mittees to attendi to the details.
2, , Q TICKETS TO BE GIVEN
OUT TODAY FOR TRACrK EET
Tickets for the Chicago track meet
will be given out from 1:30 to 5 this
afternoon in the main corridor of Uni-
vers'iy hall.
The number of tickets will be lim-
ited to 2,200, because of the Univer-
sity ruling that the attendance at any
meeting held in Waterman, gymna-
slum must be limited Lo that number.
Athletic books only will be neces-
sary, and a "first come, first served"
policy will determine who shall re-
ceive the tickets.
All freshmen who placed in the
freshman meet and all tryouts for the
Varsity squad whose names appear
on the chart in the gymnasium will
be admitted to the meet by giving
their names at the door.

Statements made by Miss Melinda
Alexander, leader of the Liberal
movement in the Chicago district, and
assistant secretary of the committee
of "Forty-eight," were received with
protests by a part of an audience .of
250 students, as well as several fac-
ulty members, at a meeting held in
Lane hall at 4:15 o'clock Friday aft-
ternoon.
Many Ex-Service Men Present
Among the audience were many ex-
service men, who voiced their indigna-
tion .and disapproval of Miss Alexand-
er's statements. Stamping of feet and
incessant hissing were causes of con-
stant interruption to the speaker.
Although she did not cast direct
slurs upon the American Legion, Miss
Alexander's remarks were indirectly
aimed at discrediting that organiza-
tion, and she also made insinuating
statements concerning President Wil-
son, General Wood and other men of
national prominence, it is said.
SCritlcizes Wilson
"Woodrow Wilson, representing the
interests of the American people, de-
layed the return of the railroads to
the private owners two months, at the
expense of the common people and to
the financial benefit of the owners,"
declared Miss Alexander. About Gen-
eral Wood, -she said, "General Wood
has, on several occasions, declared
himself opposed to free speech and
free press."
Prof. Hobbs Protests
At this point, Prof. W. H. Hobbs, of
the geology department, who was pre-
sent, interrupted the speaker, saying,
"My purpose in coming here this aft-
ernoon was to learn something about
the committee of "Forty-eight" and
its purpose, but up to this time I
have learned nothing. I have been di-
vided in my feeling between indigna-
tion at what Miss Alexander has said,
and admiration for her pluck in con-
tinuing in the face of such obstacles.
The speaker has done nothing this aft-
ernoon but cast slurring remarks
about some of the most distinguished,
most learned and most sincere men
of the country." Miss Alexander in-
vited any member of the audience to
come up on the platform and disprove
her statements. No one offered to do
so.
After the meeting, David H. Fink,
instructor in the department of sociol-
ogy, expressed himself as "ashamed of
the action taken by one of those pre-
sent in approving of the students'
rowdyism." He declared that such an,
'unsportsmanlike attitude was against
the oldest traditions of Michigan.
"48" Platform

DR. SAMUEL ELIOT

I

Robert Dieterle, Frank Taber,
Russel Carter to Provide
Variety of Music

and

SAMUEL A. ELIOT PRINCIPAL,
SPEAKER AT MEETING SUNDAY
University union services to be held
at 6:30 o'clock tomorrow night in
Hill auditorium will not last more
than than an hour, according to a
ruling made at a meeting of the stu-
dent's committee on union church
services. Mr. Samuel Atkins Eliot,
son of the late Charles W. Eliot of
Harvard, will be the principal speak-
er. The solist for the service ,will be
Robert R. Dieterle of the School of
Music, with Frank A. Taber at the
organ. Congregational singing is to
be under the direction of Russel Carter
of the School of Music.
Tomorrow's services are the fourth
of the series of union servicef, which
are directed by a committee of prom-
inent students on the campus. Elec-
tions for next year of the student
committee have already been made,
and will be announced soon. The
next union services will be held on,
April 25.
7*c1aoo avors
Free Delegates
Washinton, March 12.-William G.
McAdoo telegraphed Coleman C.
Vaughn, secretary of state of Michigan,
today that he would immediately re-
lease delegates from any obligatoion
to support him if the Democratic elec-
tors in Michigan -'primaries endorse
him for president.
Mr. McAdoo favors the sending of
uninstructed delegates to the national
convention and early this week re-
quested Secretary Vaughn to with-
draw his name from the primary bal-
lots.
ALRA Ni SELECTS ROOVER
AS P1ES1DJNTIAL CANDIDATE

GOT. LIOWDEN EXPECTED''
IN ANN ARBOR FR
LEAGUE ARRANGES FOR TWO
SPEECHES DURING STAY
HERE "
Gov. Frank O. Lowden of Illinois,
candidate for the Republican nomina-
tion for president, will be in Ann Ar-
bor next Friday, accompanied by his
wife.
Will Make Two Speeches
The governor's program is being
arranged by the Young Men'; Lowden

GRANT 142 DEGREES;
WILL PURCHASE BONDS
Spident Fees Will Be Paid in Water-
man Gymnasium Net
Fal
The petition of the Student council,
requesting that speeches of .a politi-
cal nature be permitted in Hill audi-
torium, was laid on the table by the
Board of Regents at its meeting yes-
terday.
Action was postponed as no feasi-
ble plan was offered to govern the dis-
cussions, ani the Regents expressel
the belief that the safest plan was to
continue with the present method,
Difficulty would be encountered, they
said, in deciding who should be al-
lowed to speak in the auditorium.-
.To Colleet Fees in Gymnasium
Payment of Zees in the first semester
of next year will be made by the.-stu-
dents in Waterman gymnasium to
avoid congestion similar to that of
this year, according to a ruling made
by the Regents.
"The work of the young men of your
University is so satisfactory that we
will continue our two scholarships of
$500 for another year," was the sub-
stance of a letter from the National
Analyn Dye company to the Board of
Regents.
The question of raising the fees for
next year was taken up, but action was
postponed until the next meeting,
which is in two weeks, when the re-
port of a committee appointed for the
purpose Friday will be given.
Other matters were considered and
acted upon by the Reg 3. The fi-
nance committee was authorized to
buy government bonds of that1 type'
which in its estimation would bring
the University the largest income.
Forty thousand dollars will be expend-
ed In accordance with the ad iinistra-
tion of trust funds.
Will Give Course in Embalming
A course in embalming will be of-
fered at the Summer session. Fifteen
scholarships of $25 each, which are
offered by the Michigan State Funer-
al Directors' and Embalmers' associa-
tion, were accepted by the Board. The
report on the work of the summer en-
gineering camp at Camp Davis was
read.
A certain amount of advertising in
The Michigan Daily was voted by the
Regents. The auditing boaird was giv-
en the power to open Alumni house
on Washtenaw for the use of Chinese
students, who will attend the meeting
of the Chinese Students' Alliance as-
sociation.
A number of additions were made to
the, faculty. Carl Hubbs, at present
curator of-fishes in the Field museum,
was appointed to a like position in the
University. Van Lieux Minor was ap-
pointed an instructor in history for
the second seemster. Mrs. Helen
Newberry, member of the Newberry
board of governors, was elected to
succeed herself.
- Grant Degrees
Graduate degrees of M.A. were con-

AIT WILSON'S WORD
IN COAL CONTROVERSY
PUBLICATION OF MAJORITY AND
MINORITY REPORTS
WITHHELD
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 12. - In all
luarters concern'ed over the bitumin-
us coal controversy a disposition was
n evidence tonight to await Presi-
lent Wilson's word before taking
ny action.
Publicity Withheld
The majority and minority reports
f the commission appointed to make'
settlement, it was said at the White
louse, would not be made public un-
it the president determined whether
he comiission members would rec
ncile their views.
Will Wait for Wilsoa
John L. Lewis, president, and other
ficials of the mine workers' union;
ept in close touch with the situation
oday but refrained from comment. It
vas apparent, however, that the or-
,apiz4tion would not move until the
resident reached a determination of
is view. Likewise tie operqtors'
epresentativas would await develop-
lent ,
The majority reports that the men
e given a 25 per cent increase in
rages including the 14 per cent
warded last December. The minor-
.y report will recommend that the
ncrease be fixed at" approximately

league and will contain two principal
speeches, one for men students and
business men and one for men and
women. The time that the governor
will be in Ann Arbor will be limited
to a few hours so his program will
necessarily be short, according to
men in charge of the work of ar-
ranging his schedule here.
Robert McCormack Adam;, nation-
al chairman of the Young Men's Low-
den league, addressed 80 students and
business men at the Lowden club din-
ner Thursday night at the Union ou
the national political situation.
Gives Lowden's Record
Following Mr. Adams, W. E. Hull,
chairman of the . Michigan Lowden
league campaign, spoke of Mr. Low-
den's fitness for° the presidency. He
dwelt on his excellent record as a
lawyer, business man, politician and
farmer and emphasized the need of a
business man for the next president.
Regent Junius E. Beal spoke of Mr.
Lowden from the standpoint of a long
time friend. Mr. Beal spoke of the,
governor's all-around capabilities and
emphasized the wonderful personality.
and exceptional business ability which
Mr. Lowden has shown during his
years as governor of Illinois.
Forum Discusses
Faculty A dvancee
General discussion on 'the stand-1
ards and methods of promotion among
the faculty members constituted the
program of the meeting of the Univer-
sity forum last night at the Union. An
exceedingly large number of faculty
men attended the meeting and though
no definite action was taken the sub-
ject was discussed at length and many{
suggestions were offered as to faculty
promotions.
The University forum is an organ-
ization of the younger faculty men
who meet to discuss important ques-
tions concerning the University. An,
organization has been perfected and
meetings are held regularly at the
Union.

A. E. F. MAN DISAGREES WITH
COLONEL GANSSER AT SMOKER
After the smoker held in the Union
last Thursday evening by the ver
seas men of the University, some dis-
turbance was caused by one oft tI9
ex-members of the A. E. F. whp djs-
agreed with the sentiments of Cognol
Gansser's speech. As the colonel had
to make an early tain, tho digc s-
sion was short, but the uatter Went
far enough for the overseas mp to
appoint a committee to tq ke _tio
on the "affair.
DONALD PORTER E ECT TO
STUDENT COUNCIL BRY 4V1 jOjR
Donald J. Porter was -electat stu-
dent councilman of the junior literary
class at the election held yesterday in,
University hall. A finance commit-
tee has been appointed to collect the
dues of the deliniquent juniors by the
president, and final plans have been'
made for the junior literary class
dance to be held Saturday afternoon,'
Warch 20.
Ec. 32 Students to Meet Monday
All sections of Economics 32 will
meet Monday at 2 o'plel xil rom p
of the Law building.

The platform as outlined by Miss
Alexander at the meting L a to1
lows :
"Public ownership of transporta-
tion, including stockyards, large abat-
Stoirs, grain elevators, terminal ware-
ihouses, pipe lines and tanks. ' Public
bwnership o other public utilities and
of the principal natural resources,
such as coal, oil, natural gas, min,'
eral deposits, large water powers and
large commnercial timber traets.
"No land (including natural resoure-
es) and no patents be held out of use
for speculationR or to aid monopoly.,
We favor taxes to force idle land in-
tq qual economic, political and legal
rights for all, irrespective of sex or
.color. The immediate and absolute
'restoration of free speech, free press,
peaceable assembly' and all civil
rights guaranteed by the Constitution.
We demand the abolition of injunc-
tions in labor cases. We indorse the'
effort of labor to share in the man-
agement of industry and labor's right
to organize and bargain collectively
-through representatives of its OVA
choosing.''
Hold Dluei
A dinner in the dining-room of Lane'
(Continued on Page Six)

Herbert Clark Hoover .was the man
selected to be presidential candidate
from the Republican party in a mock
national convention held at x:30 last
night in the club rooms of the Alpha
Nu debating society, on the fourth
floor of University hall. The men
were so pleased with this convention
that they voted to have a similar con-
vention for Democratic candidates ar-
ranged in the near future.
Many interesting facts were made
known concerning several of the men
who mightbe considered as possible
nominees and the general interest ran
high.
(IEWELRY BANDITS HOLD UP
CROWD WHILE RO BING STORE
New York, March 12.-While Broad-
way was crowded with theater goers,
three armed bandits smashed in the
'window of a jewelry store at 37
street, held the crowd at bay with
their revolvers until they had emp-
tied the coat nts of several trays into
their pockets 'and then escaped, shoot-
ing one pedestrian who attempted to
stop them.

ferred upon Lester C. Douer, L. I
Erickson, and-J C. Peter. W. E. Cal
J. P. Cooley, J. H. Muejsken, Erne
Reed, Charles E. Sandow, and E.
Skaggs received M.S. degrees, and :
B. Snow was granted a Master of Sc
ence degree in engineering.
Law degrees of LL.B. were give
to Arthur. Bone, Roland G. Dunn,
F Forgan, H. D. Ireland, B. H. Scha
ner, W. C. Surrel, H. J. Sladens.
A large number of students, wl
completed their wok the first seme
ter, were recommended for degree
The following received Bachelor
Arts degrees:
Rutgers Alexander, N. B. Bartz, J
C. W. Bishop, R. J. Bradfield. (as
class of 19s), Bernice Brown, D.
Campbell (as of class of 1918), H.
Caulkins, B.- R. Clark, F. R. Clar
Sarah Clarkson, H. R. Cossitt, W. '1
Darnall, Georgia M. Davis, B. W. Doi
aldson, C. C. Drbuar, R. A. Dunnel
G. W. Emery, E. F. Ganechow (asr
class of 1919), A. C. Haigh,R. H. Han
' (Continued on Page Six)

Out Fire Department
partment an~swered a
Ann Arbor Machine
-1 A rr a v ~nn..*.

Wiseonsin to Have Memorial Union
Madison, March 12.-A campaign to
rise $150,000 in Milwaukee county
for the proposed Memorial Union
building at the University o'f Wiscon-
sin was opened last week at a meet-
ing of 160 graduates of the university.
The meeting was addressed by, Prof.
S. W. Gilman of the university course
in commerce. ' ° *

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