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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 12, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, MARCH.]

iorning except Monday during the Univer-
in Control of Student Publications.
OF THE ASS9CIATED PRESS
'ress is exclusively entitled to the tusc for
vs dispatches credited to it or not* therwiiC
and the local news published therein.
stoffice at Ann Arbot, Michigan, secotd

Otreet.

O ~
sts isa-

s

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
EDITOR.....................HARRY M. CAREY
k K. Ehlbert Edgar L. Rice
M. Campbell JsehA.$Berstein
rge BrophynHghgHichcock
xI A. Shinnman
......... .H. Hardy Heth, LeeM. Wo~truM
t..................................JohnLaudaS
t ...............................Hrewster Campbe l
. ...... ... . .. RobertC
artmnt...............Margdeite Clark
.........Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Assistants
G. P;. Clarke
Thomas. Whinery.
R. W. Wroblesk-i
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt

Winefred Biethan
Robert D.).Sage
F. P. hove oy
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 9861
AGER..................PAUL E. CHOLBTTE
.LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B . vsU
e - -ads ----................... --W h
Edward Prieto
....Curt P. Schneider. R. A. SUllvai

Assistants
F. M. Heath
Sigmund Kunstadter
Harold Lindsay'

D. P. Joyce
Robt. So mervilie
Arthur 'L. Glaser

-r

.

wishing to isecure information concerning news forsay
Dily should see the night eitr who a e
, be printed that night.
lht editors for this week wilt be: Monday.
ar L. Rice; Tuesday night, Mark EhI-.
lnesday night,- George Brophy; Thursday
igh Hitchcock; Friday night, C.' M.
Saturday night, Joseph A. Bernstein.
FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 192,
for the "What's Going On" comtz will
eived after 8 o'clock on the night % *reced-
te of issue. This rule will go into effect
INDOOR CONFERENCE MEET
in's track season has started. Having an-
inidoor victory at Urbana last week, the
>w preparing for the big conference meet
I at Northwestern, March 20. Vo- two
re years. we have won both the indoor and
Nestern- conference championships,- and.
ent indications this year's team wil again
the premier honors of the west.
>tball and basketball seasons both proved
from a standpoint of victories won. H w-
student body gave them their enthusiastic
Ven though hopes of winning the confer-
pionship were obliterated in the early part
astn. Now with everything pointing to-
npionship -teams in track and baseball we
ant to lessen our enthusiasm. We waht
t Michigan's athletes alike in victory and
nan in the University who has a possible
getting to Evanston a week from tomor-
d make every effort to do so. Although
our indoor track team will come off
.t, nevertheless a large crowd of rooters
there to cheer the men on. Splendid 'ma-
fine coaching are. the essentials that go
p the personnel of our teams, but it is the
ic backing from the sidelines that helps
>ry assured. Those wishing to make the
'Isee about reservations at the earliest pos-
.ent. Do not hesitate but decide- today that
to be one of those present when the cheers
given at Northwestern. Help Michigan
year in splendid fashion.
4LEGE PUBLICATIONS PULL
TOGETHER
te intercollegiate news association which-:
process of formation under plans made'
Delta Chi, National professional jour-
aternity, heralds an extension -of Univer-
ichigan influence everywhere through-
te. While the benefits of .the news serv-
lationships formed by the plan will ac-
rery college which can boast of a publi-
University will be expected to take the.
ise of its size, and because of -the supe-
in and equipment which it is the. Daily's
me to possess.
a of. the new association is threefold: to
:er relationships between nearly 30'publi-
the state, including exchange of informa-
iff organization and efficiency; to aid- the
embers in securing news- Items from the
olleges; and to send college news to met-

ticularly in view of the present undergraduate haz-
in"s on other colleges of Michigan. It would do
us no harm to find out that M.- A. C. is much more
than a "cow college ;" to learn the real ratings of
the normal schools of Michigan; and to find out
some interesting facts regarding its wonderful
school of mines. On the whole, the scheme is one
of reciprocal advertising which will make for a
greater friendship. The University should gain
greatly by it, especially because of its position of
leadership. f
Lastly, more reliable news service to the city pub-
lieations would be a great relief, and would do much
to avert "ouija board" canards in the future. And
a general raising and professionalizing of college
journalistic standards should result inevitably from
the exchange of ideas and methods.
A SINGLE STANDARD OF ELIGIBILITY
At present, the eligibility committee of the Board
in Control of Stndent Athletics enforces one set of
rules for athletes, while a similar body of the Stu-
dent Affairs committee administers a different, code
of rules for students who desire to take part in non-
athletie activities.
Why not, at a single stroke, simplify the eligi-
bility rules by combining them in a single code,
at the saMe time adding efficieney to their adminis-
tration- by uniting the two committees in one Uni-
versity eligibility committee?
In addition to simplifying rules and enforcement,
the plan of combination would have this important
result: everyone wopld be convinced that we were
making no special discriminations in favor of our
Sathletes. The very' existence of a separate athletic
committee and code, tended to set up unfortunate
suspicions, though they really had no ground, in-
asmuch as the two sets of rules average up about
equally in strictness.
Neither the Student Affairs committee nor the
Board in Control of Athletics would lose in power
by the change. Each would be fully represented on
the new committee, whose members would be sub-
ject to the original instructions of the parent bodies.
Nowhere would the ironing out- of dissimilari-
ties in the two codes conflict with conference rules.
The' principal differences to be compromised are
thfee ini nuimber: - .
(i' At present the athletic rules require that a
man shall. have as many honor points as hours
credit; the non-athletic rules, that he shall pass one
semester with grades of C or above.
(a}).if a man who has been- on the warned list
makes more, points than hours but still has a D, he
.s eligible for athletic, but not for non'-athletic ac-
tivities.
(3) An E bars a man for an entire year from
athletics, but for only a semester in non-athletic
activities.
It is obvious that this clash in a few minor points
could easily be straightened out, and'a common code
set up for enforcement by the suggested committee.
sNo,larice, a man whoeloafs while going to
school is not always college bred.-
Dear Noah. -
Our cashier recently absconded with $iooo. To
what account should i charge this money?
Bookkeeper.
Ignorancep like this is indeed pitiful. Even the
office boy could 'tell- you that you ought to charge
this money to running -expenses.
So many of our-mele readers have written us such
touching letters asking-that we continue our course
that we have decided to give
LESSON IV
On "How to Be Vitty Tho' in Love"
In these days of spiritualism and other isms per-
taining to. the hereafte, the man who is unable to
discourse learnedly (especially from personal ex-

perience) on this subject is liable to find himself
relegated to the class of social nonentities, Ac-
cordingly when the, conversation has been turned in
this channel- you suddenly electrify those present
by remarking in a tone which-you try hard to make
casual, "This disappearance of spirits is something
I have been well acquainted with since my earliest
youth."
When the gasp of astonishment has subsided you
proceed to elucidate to your spellbound listeners. A
reminiscent tone (the' kind the boys use when re-
ferring. to the Orient and the "good old days") will
be found to be very effective. Accordingly you
say, "Why, I remember distinctly once the teacher
asked me the following problem,.-'If your father
had three barrels of whiskey in his cellar each con-
taining 50 gallons and he drank a quart a day how
long would the whiskey last?' Unhesitatingly I re-
plied, "Three months." The teacher looked rather
severely at me and said, "My boy, I see you don't
know arithmetic." And then in my childish, naive
way I replied, "Yes, and you don't know my father."
Your reputation is thereupon established as the
life of the party, and from thence on you may be
reasonably sure that every remark you make
whether pertaining to the weather or trying to break
the, news to the widow will be misconstrued as in-
tended to be laugh-evoking. J. W. K.
Pamous Closing Lines.
"Ha, vanishing cream," muttered milady as she
caught her maid -using her own particular brand.
NOAH COUNT.

Just

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 1919)
Between Detroit, Ann' Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)Y
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:1o a.
m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Car-8:481
a. nm., and every hour to 9 :48 p. m. (E4-
presses make local stopswest of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:05 a. I., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to-g:o5 p. mi., :o3o
p. mn. To Ypsilaniti only, 11 :. p. =7.,1:10
a. 1n.. and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound---:48 a. m. and
12 20 a.i. m.;
Asked At ARa nd om
(Any member of the University, pro-
fessor or student, who hassa subject
he) wishes discussed in this column,
mayrmail it to the "Asked at Random"
reporter care of The Daily.)'
Today's question: "Do you think
Michigan -should provide dormitories
for the men studentsl"
Curtis E. Bottum, '20E, Student
councilman: "Without doubt this is
a. coming thing for Michigan, though
I doubt if the time is ripe.Forfresh-
men it will be the real thing, though-
I doubt if it would he advisable for
upperclassmen."
Alan F. King, '20E, business' mana-
ger of the Student Directory: " I
think dormitories are absolutely nec-
essary for 'freshAlen, as . they need
considerable supervision. In due
time Michigan will undoubtedly pro-
vide- these dormitories for first year
men.'
Henry Whiting, '21, Student coun-
cilman: "I do not think dormitories
for men students would be practical
for Michigan. The present 'system is
of too long standing to be changed.
For a younger university this plan
would be more practical."
Joseph, A. Avery, '21, president of
the Comedy club: "Asta means of
relieving conge'stion in the matter of
rooms for students and supplying'
comfortable living accommodations
at reasonable prices, I believe a well
administrated men's dormitory would
be a great help."
Dixie Club to be Re-organized
To re-organize the old Dixie club
a meeting will be held Tuesday night
in room 318-320 of the Union. All
students from the 3outhern states are
cordially urged to attend. Those who
can play musical instruments are re-
quested to bring them along.
CREOLE PRALINES at Tices' Drug
Store. 117 S. Main St.-Adv.

Received

r lrrlrrrllirl rrrrrrrrrrrrrl N lrll Itillrlrrl XrrH1111111ril r lli11111111lilHI1lr 1-
R Pargulent's
Exercises Francais
Bleyer's
Special Features- Articles
c aste'd7 --
Genetics and Eugenies
UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES
THE AMERICAN CIGAR STORE
Billiards and Pocket Billiards
Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobaccos, Candies, Soft Drinks, Magazines
Daily and Sunday Papers.
514 E. WILLIAM STREET
(One block froni Campus)
SPECIAL CUT PRICES ON CIGARS, CIGARETTES, & TOBACCOS
TRY OUR
M. A. C. Pimento Cheese made in the dairy
department at then Michigan Agricultural
College.
Everything for your Sunday night feeds.
Come and see what we have.
1E191. LIBERTY STREET
B U R T' DELICATESSEN ' PHONE - -. - 2620-R
.- - - - - - - - - - - - -

R

.

Johnson and VanMetre
Railway Transportation
A HAM

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TAXI

999

ME
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A DODGE CAR AND
DODGE SERVICE ---
ENO06H SAID. X
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THE COMMITTEE OF FORTY-EIGHT

OUR PLATFORM

PUBLIC ownership of transportation, intluding stock yards, large abattoirs, grain elevators, ter-
I minal warehouses, pipe lines and tanks. Public ownership of other public utilities and of the
principal natural resources, such as coal, oil, natural gas, mineral deposits, large water powers and
large commercial timber tracts.
0 land (including natural resources) and no patents be held out of use for speculation or to
aid monopoly. We favor taxes to force idle land into use.
EQUAL economic, political and legal rights f for all, irrespective of sex or color. The imme-
diate and absolute restoration of free speech, free press, peaceable assembly, and all civil
rights guaranteed by the Constitution. We demand the abolition of injunctions in labor cases.
We indorse the effort of labor to share in the management of industry, and labor's right to organ-
ize and bargain collectively through representatives of its, own choosing.

OUR AIMS

The present purpose of our. work is to arouse popular discussion.
Our program is tentative. The delegates to the Conference of the Committee, of Forty-eight
found they could unanimously agree upon this program. But they also .agreed to submit this pro-
grain to the American people for discussion, in the hope that popular discussion may create a de-
mand for the adoption of even a better program at the political convention attended by the represen-
tative delegates which will be held prior to July 1st next. The convention will be free to change
or modify our program, according to the will of the delegates.
ee
MISS MELINDA ALEXANDER, of Montana,
an outstanding figure at our St. Louis Convention, and now National Secretary at Chicago, will
. address an open meeting on

THE LIBERAL MOVEMENT
LANE HALL, Friday, March 12, 4:15 P. Id.
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED

i

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