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March 12, 1920 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-12

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I

r~b 01A~pn

A d

bAV ANJJ NIGHT
SER~VICE

TODAY

,

XXX No. 115.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 1920.

PRICE THR

COMMISSION
BLE TO A6REE
NAGEINCRAlSE

MAJORITY
RAISE;

UPHOLD V, PER CENT
OTHER CONDITIONS
SAME

DO NOT EXPET MEN 7
TO ACCEPT DECISIONt
White Advocates Greater Boost Than
Granted;'Wishes Seven Hour -
DayG
By Associated. res
Waehin torII March 11.. - The con-!
rIlssioul appoited by ~resident Wilson1
il settle'the ooal strikleas split def-
nitey on the guestion of wage in-
creases and hours of work., E
The majority, in a report submitted-
to President Wilson today, was u-
derstood to have recommendedA agen-
erl wage advance of approximately
25 per cent and that hours and con-
ditions of labor remain unchanged.
John D. White, represeiting the min-
ers, refused to concur in this settle
ment and is preparing a report in
which it is reported he will recom-
mend a seven hour day and a wage
inerease of approximately 25 per cent,
Acceptance Not Expected
In advance of the publication of the
two reports, oficials of the United
Mine Workers' would not discussithe
probable course of the miners. Since
the representatives on the commission1
had refused to accept the majority de-
cision, however, it was regarded as
certain that they would not accept the
settlement -it proposes.
No Radical Difference
William Green, secretary of the
Miinrs union, after a onfeence With
Secretary Tumulty of the White
house ,late 'today sai there as no
radical difference btween the luajo-
ity and ir. White 4nd expresse t e
hope the difference woui. be ironed
pgit t a pint meting betwee the
operator and the miler.
Presidep Wilso, in inviting the
members of the commission to under-'
take a sttlemnt, sai it was impor-
tant that their oncluins be reacIed
by unanimous action. 5ince the com--
mission's 4ecision i nt unapiMqs,
there .js iueh spculati ih ts t the
presidet's ile;t step.
The P njoriy repprt wd made by
@inpy gbinspi, represntig the pb-
lip, agn Hembrandt lyeaie, represent-
i11 the opertrs.
RIESS MUST REST
FOR ANOTHER WEEK
Business 4anager of Chimes Forced
to Return Home After Relapse
Walter S. Riess, '22L, business mana-
ger of the Michigan Chimes, who re-
turned to the campus Monday after
having been at his home in Toledo
recovering from an illness, was forced
yesterday afternoon to return to his,
home. His condition, local physicians,
report, is such that another week of
rest will be necessary for recovery.
During his absence Stewart Sonne,
20, will preside over meetings of the
* Chimes business staff, while the heads
of the departments of the business
staff will manage the work until next
week.
-. TS ELECT CU J LMA T -
4Y; T !IAE US DANCE
W1ection of student councilman of
t 4,g juniqr lit class wil hbe held from
14 tg f ' o! k td y 4t the booth in
Univerit hall. The candidates to be
'oed upon ae, Eqwa d 8. Kingsford,
, ti}? J. rter, n4 'heoore C.
A ciass dance will be held fro} 2:30
g 0 p'clock p March 2 At the
aiP. "4a4y" Wilspn's ┬žeyen piece
4zz prphestra will furish the music.

Tickets can be Mepured from the class
ocers or from any member of the so-
dlal committee,
Chi ago Architect Speaks on Schools
Mr. D. f. Perkins of the areiitect-
Ural firm of Perkins, Fellows, and
Hamilton, Chicago, spoke before they
students in architecture yesterday af-
ternoon on "Designs of High School

FRIDAY SUGGESTS
NEW FRATERNITY
In connection with plans formutat-
ed for a fraternity based upon sales-
manship in which membership is gain-
ed by making at least $1,000 during
the summer -vacation, Prof. David
Friday suggests a fraternity based on
commerce. Fraternities of this type,
exist in New York and other places,
and he believes that the plan would be
successful here.
Professor Friday believes that so
many people have money of which
they wish to make use that a great
number of new fraternities and soror-
ities are springing up all over the
country. He thinks also that within
a few years the campus will be nearly
surrounded with dormitories.
Luncheondclubs forumeno the Uni-
versity are part of a plan suggested
by Professor Friday. These clubs
have proved, successful in New York
and are a good means of drawing to-
gether men- having the same inter-
ests. The Michigan Union would form
an admirable place for such lunch-
eons, according to Professor Friday.
DISCUSSION GROUP MAY
TEACH NEW LANSUA6E
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB CONSIDERS
,PLANS FOR INSTRUCTIN(K
IN ESPERANTO
.Esperanto, the new world-language,
will be taught in the discussion group
of the Cosmopolitan club, according to
plans that are now under way. "The
language is interesting and can be
mastered in a month or two," .says
I. C. Tung, '20, chairman of the com-
mittee that has been considering the
matter. "We are very fortunate in
having a man who is able and willing
to teach it, Mr, Jaffe, a student from
Russi.e
New Tongue .Interesting
"This language is being taught in
many of the F4ropean universities,
and. is bound to be interesting to the
students of the Upiversity." WIg points
out that the advantage of such a lang-
uage will be that when it is more
universally known, it will provide a
'medium of conmunicatlon for all the
races of the world. The simplicity of
the language and the ease with whch
it may be learned are said to be great-.
ly in its favor,
Plan Further pisc~usslon
A meeting for the further discus-
sion of the feasibility of giving such
a course independent of the Univer-
sity, and the organization of a class
in speranto will be held at 7 30
o'clock Saturday night in room 302
of University hall
ALPHA NU WILL NOMINATE
CANDIDATES FOR PRESIDENT
Debating Society Will Bold Special
Meeting to Pick Men for
Republican ket
A nominating convention for presi-
dential 'candidates from the Republi-
can party will be held at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in room 402 University hall.
'This feature will take the place of the
regular program in the meeting of the
Alpha Nu debating society an tiw
proceedings will, follow the rgulgr
order of the national party conven-
tion.
Six men haye, expressed their inten-
tion of nominatng some one of the
possible Republican candidates for

president of the United states. These
men will each be allowed eight min-
utes, after which anyone present may
speak in behalf of his choseoi candt-
,date for three minutes. Lvcryoxe is
invited to attend qn4 take part in the
convention.
The subject for the annual inter-.
society cup debate will be anncunced
at this meetig.

"The prospect of a flight across the
Pacific ocean by the proposed gov-
ernment flying boats is highly prob-
able," said Prof. F.. W. Pawlowski,
of the aeronautical department in the
college of engineering., recently. He
sets no time limit for the event but
is confident that the project will
eventually meet tremendous success.
Professor Pawlowski returne, to
his duties at the University early in
February after an extended leave of
- -
IDLE LAND.PERIL
TO0BE DISCUSSED-
Agricultural Aspects of State's Land
Policies to Be Feature of
Convention
ACADEMY OF -SCIENCE PLANS
TO MEET HERE IN LATE MARCH
Vital public questions, in which sci-
'entipic men can and must co operate
with the state administrative officers,
will be raised this year at the annual
meeting of the Michigan Academy of
Science to be held here March 31 to
April 3, according to Dr. C, 0. Sauer
of the geoldgy department, chairman
of the committee on Land Problems.
The principal feature of this year's
meeting of the Academy will be a
" a
discussion of "The Peril of Michigan's
Idle Lands."
Committee formed Year Ago
At a meeting held a year' ago, the
committee of which Doctor Sauer is
chairman was appointed to assemble
the facts and to formulate plans look-
ing toward the solution of the idle
land; problem in Michigan. The pro-
grain as planned' includes speakers of
wide prominence such as L. Whitney
Watkins, Dean Shaw of the State Ag-
ricultural college, Dean Davenport of
the University of Illinois, and Sec.
George Lusk of the Public Domain
'commission.
On Thursday evenig, April 1, the
subject, "Michigan's Idle Land Per-
il," will be introduced by Professor
Sauer of the geology depagtment,
Prof. Filbert Roth, head of the for-
estry department will speak on "The
Forest Fire Menace," Professor Cox
of the Michigan Agricultural college
will deal with "The Agricultural Fii-
ture of Our Idle Lands," and Prof. P.
S. Lovejoy of the forestry department
will talk on "The Need for a Policy
for Our Idle Lands."
"With one-third of the state of
Michigan practically bankrupt, the
problem of making this area produc-
tive is decidedly pressing," said Doc-
tor Sauer.
To Talk on Land Policies
'On Friday afternoon, April 2, there
will be held a discussion of the poli-
cies regarding Michigan land pro,-
lems. Mr. L. Whitney Watkins. Dea
Shaw, and Secretary Luk will lead
the discussio.
Friday evening, April 2, Deatn Dav-
enport, of. Illinois, will give a lec-
ture on "The New fay. in Amerian
Agriculture,"" emphasizig the need for
and suggesting means of firther c-
operation and pyganizat)n among
farmer;.
The sectional meetings and discus-
sions of the Academy will be held as
usual, as will also the School a'_
ter's convention,
JOHNSON.FOR-PRESJTrENT CLU

IRVAR )ETIROIT MANUFACTURER
"Have a man in tfie Whita.3Housej
who is an American," said Mr. Edward
T, Curran, Detroit manufacturer, in
speaking to the members of the John-
,son-for-President club at Lane hall
last night. He was followed by James
J. Breck, '86L, of Jackson, who gave
a short history of Progressivism and
of Hiram Johnson.
Saginaw Club Discusses Sprout Plans
Plans for the Saginaw Spring Sprout
were take up in detail at a meeting
of toe Saginaw club last night at the
Union. The Sprout is part of the
club's program to bring athletes to
Michigan.
r

Prof. F. W. Pawlow'ski
)evelopment in

TRANS-PACIFIC FLIGHT BY Um . AIR BOAT POSSIBLE

Foresees Great
Aviation

absence. During his leave he was en-
gaged in aeronautical research for the
Polish government.
Frencii Captain Prophecies
"When the Wright brothers made
their initial flights in France," con-
tinued Professor Pawlowski, "a Capt.
Kerber, of the French army, saw the
possibilities of aviation. He made the
prophecy that, 'yesterday they flew
from spot to spot, today from city to
city, tomorrow from continent to con-
tinent.' I see no reason why. the fu-
ture should not witness a non-stop
flight around the world. It is only a
question of time before increased size
and superior construction will make*
such an attempt possible."
Aerial Navigation to Develop
Professor Pawlowski is confident
that' aerial: navigation will develop
with great leaps. The airplane and
flying boat have proven their com-
mercial value. Many deep-sea fishiAg
concerns now employ H-flying boats
to spot the schools of fish. Govern-
-ments have recognized the value of
the airplane for rapid mail service..
Geological survey and forestry super-
visionguse planes extensively.
The transportation of perishable
goods, machine parts, medical and
surgical supplies, motion pictures aid
newspapers is demanding a more rap-
id conveyance. In Europe aerial taxi
service is an accomplished fact. Bus
lines will be the inext- advance and
even a tourist line is not .improb-
able. . .t
Present Methods Inadequate
"The present methods of passenger
transportation are inadequate," said
Professor Pawlowski, "there is a
great need of faster and safer means.
Established systems have reached the
highest speed that can be obtained
with any degree of safety. On :the
ground, the daiger increases with the
speed, while in the air the higher the
rate of travel, the lower the risk. I
see in the airplane the solution of a
difficult transportation problem."
DEAN KRAUS SEC
PROMINENT LECTURERS,

DORMITORY READY
FOR WOOD FINlSH
Wood finishing in' the new Betsy
Barbour dormitory will be started
next Monday, according to a statement
of the buildings and gr4unds depart-
ment .yesterday.
At the present time the plastering
is completed on the upper floors, and
the work with the rough plastering on
the first floor id well advanced.
The wood work, which will be a
stained finish; is now being prepar-
ed at the mill of the department of
buildings and grounds. It will be put:
in.'-on the top floors the first of next
week.
AILLEGED0 TRUST
iTO BE. ATTACKE

Department of Juste to Go on
spite Recent Decsioi of
Supreme Court

JOINT, COMMI'
VOCATIOPL NAL

De.

ENGLISH UNIVERSITY WOMEN
BE HEARD BY SUMMER
SESSION

T.

Miss Geraldine Jebb of the Univer-'
sity of Durham, England, has been
secured by Prof. E. H. Kraus, dean
of the Summer session, to lecture in
the course lto be given in connection
with the 1920 Summer session. Miss
Jebb is one of England's leaders in
social betterment work. Dean Kraus
is trying to have Miss Jebb arrange'
to be in Ann Arbor for a week of the
lecture course.
The program for the Summer school
includes several prominent lecturers,
such as Dr. Henry Berkowitz, of Phil-
aedlphia, who is scheduled for three
lectures on the relations of Judism and
Americanism, and.N 1. . Spauld-
ing, formerly in charge of the educa-
tional work of the A. E. F., who will
discuss present day educational prob-
leims..
Two excursions are planned, one to
Niagara Falls and the other to Put-
in-Bay, under the direction of Prof. 1.
D. Scott, of the 'geology department.
Tuesday evenings of the course are
given over to medical lectures, Wed-
nesday evenings to concerts and
Thursday evenings to educational
moving pictures.
Illinois. Students Hold Get-Together
Illinois students held a get-together
meeting yesterday in the Union, elet-
ing L. H. Weisel, '22, temporary chair-
,man and appointing constitutional and
publicity committees. Another meet.
ing was set for next Wednesday night
at the Union when the details of a
more permanent organization will be
taken tp.
'Request Guests to Bring Own Cards
All those planning to attend the card
All those planning toattend the card
party to be given in Martha Cook
building Saturday afternoon are re-
quested to bring their own card deck;
as otherwise it would be impossible
to supply enough cards for everyone.
City Thaws Frozen Hydrants by Steam
A steam boiler is being used by the
city to thaw out the fire hydrants in
which water has become fx'ozen due
to the severe winter.

PALMER SAYS STEE CASE
DOES NOT SET PRECEDENT'
(By Associated Press)
Washington, . March 11.-The> De-
partment of Justice will proceed
against all corporations alleged to be
trusts, regardless of the recent deci-
sion of the Supreme Court in the steel
corporation case.
In announcing the department's pol-'
icy today Attorney General Palmer
said, "the steel case does not indicate
what the high court will do in other
similar trials."
He added that the department staff
had given careful consideration to the
steel decision and had found that there.
were many. differences from a legal
standpoint inall other cases now b-
ing prepared by the government.
Nine Anti-trust suits are. now be-
fore the Supreme Court.
Copetition Keen
In Burglar Hunt
College men are always willing and
anxious to please. Especially when
the task is routing a burglar out of a.
woman's dwelling house, when the
hour is late.
Thursday night about 11 o'clock all
was quiet along North Ingalls street.
A few of the boys were studying, but
many were in bed, as it is the cus-
tom to retire very early in the neigh-
borhood. Only the tinkle of a piano
smashing out the strains of the latest
jazz tune disturbed the quiet as of the
dead.
Suddenly there was a feminine
shriek-a call for help such as only
a strange man, discovered where he
shouldn't be, could provoke. The
echoes of the shriek had not died away
before a motley collection of male
students nondescriptedly attired was
pouring forth from fraternity and
rooming houses. Where before was
only emptiness was now a jostling
crowd, all with the same goal.
A man who had been dissipating at
the Union tap room won out. He
happened to be just in front of the
house when it all happened, and thus
had a three yard handicap. His was
only a moral victory, however. All
that was found was the intruder's
cap.
GANSSER EXPRESSES LEGION
SENTIMENT TO OVERSEAS MEN
University Post of Organization to Be
Formed, Announced at Club
Smoker
"The American Legion is not ask-
'ing for a bonus. It wants compensa-
'tion for those men who, offered their
lives to their country. It draws no
distinction between the man who got
'across and the one who had to stay at
home because of the fortune of war.
"We stand for 100 per cent Ameri-
canism," weresome of the sentiments
expressed by Col. A. H. Gansser,
Michigan commander of the American
Legion,-in his 'address "before the
Overseas club at their smoker last
night in. the Union.
As a' result of the meeting a post
'of' the American Legion.will be, form-
ed in the University and those inter-
ested. are invited to attend the next
meeting, which will be held at the
Union on Thursday, March 18.

CHOICE OF LIFE WORK A
SERVICE TO BE TOPIC
OF LECTURE
TO SEEK CO-OPERATIOI
WITH EVERY STUDEN
Interchurch World Movement Exp
Presents Program to Repre-
sentatives
Approval of ahconstructive$ p
[gram for vocational guidance atA
University by a committee compo
of the deans of ,the various wcole
faculty members and church rep
-sentatives was given yesterday a
luncheon held in Lane hall.
Mr. J. B. Davis Gives Address
The vocational program for Mi
igan was presentedbygMr. Jesse
Davis, prominent Michigan educa
and now the vocational guidance
pert of the Interchurch world mo
ment. Registrar Arthur G. Hall
sided at the luncheon, which was
tended by Deans J. R. Effinger A
V. C. Vaughan, Profs. E. C. God
and L. A.; Hopkins, and Dean Myra
Jordan.
No new organization will be
fected, the plan as propos9d by
Davis being favorably passed upon
the committee. The program
Michigan will consist of a gene
committee composed of student p
tors, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. r
resentatives and professors *iMder
chairmanship of a prominent. fac
member who will seek to secure
co-operation of every student on
campus. An executive secretary to
chosen from. one of the student I
tors will handle ail records of
committee and seek enlistments
servce in the Interchurch iovm,
Entire University Co-operates
A course of lectures on the ch
of a vocation and Christian service
to be given beforeoupperclassmen of
departments from time to time. A-i
teinatic plan for counseling witfi
dents in regard to their life work'
also be worked out and a list of
'lcted, advisers drawn up. The
operation. of all the colleges of
University has been' secured for I
extensive program.
HOUSTON, EFNWL
OPPOSE BON0I1
DECLARE FURTHER INCREASE
GOVERNMENT DEBT
DANGEROUS
Washington, March 11.-Oppos
former Secretary McAdoo's plan
additional bond issue, Secretary H
ton and Assistant Secretary Leil
well today told the ,House Ways
Means committee which is consid
ing soldier relief legislation, that
increase in the present governi
indebtedness would create a grave
nancial situation.
Increase Dangerous
Secretary Houston predicted the
bond issue of $2,500,000,000 necess
under certain plans of adjusted c
pensation now before the commi'
"might result in a disaster" while
Leffingwell said " the worst thing
'sble would be to give bond to
'mer soldiers as a great majority
them would cash their holdings
mediately."
Would Raise H. C. L.

'Both suggested, increased taxes
"the least harmful way to extend
'lief, the assistant secretary asser
that even a tax on normal inco
would add to the cost of living and
directly felt by those least able
bear it.
DAILY DIRECTORY SUPPLEME1
OMITTED FROM TODAY'S ISS
Announcement is made that
Daily Directory Supplement has b
necessarily omitted from today's
sue. It will appear as usual, h
ever, tomorrow.

Bulletin

(By A sociated Press)
Springfield, Mo., March 10.-Eleven
persons wire killed and many injur-
ed in a toinado which struck Melva,
Taney com iy, today aecording to aI
message re elved here tonight. AI
special train is taking the injured to
Branson. Tiree men were killed at
Nevada, 60 iles northwest of Joplin.
Considerably property damage was

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