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October 09, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t'

nd Ed
d vice-
ooth
which
Arbor
the ci
direct
ans for
who is
Press,

himself as highly in favor of the pro- commission. The council on the con-
sect for co-operation between the trary advised the board that it id notCITY 11 TB
Times-News and the ,journalism de- favor this move so late in the fall and
-mund W. partment of the University. recommended that the tracks be left , IEpr ietw r th y If
Publishing The board of public works met Wed-
h recently nesday night to carry out measures DANCING (Continued fro
r Times- adopted at the council meeting Mon- Classes in ballroom dancing at the brought to 145 degi
ty taking 'day night. Packard- Academy will begin Oct. 14, for '30 minutes, the
ion of the One of the principal matters brought at 7 p. m. Number limited, register the cream or milk,a
r its man- up was that the Detroit, Jackson & early by phone, 1850-F1. Lady ant into ice cream as
Chicago railway should be required to gentleman instructors. Assemblies product. It is th
s manager lay its track in Jackson in accordance every Mon'day and Thursday at 8 p. incorrectly, brough
expressed with the plan of the state highway m. Private lessons by appointment.- which is spoiled by
"However, clean]
certified by a comp

COMMISSION.
om Page One)
gees. and kept there
ere is no injury to
and it can be made
well as the raw
e milk pasteurized
it to' 160 degrees,
y the process.
milk, examined and
etent medical com-
need pasteurization.
ho prefer the raw
we cannot be sure
e milk thus served
alls Behind

RETURNIN6 STUDENTS
RECEIVE WAR CREDIT

1

9RE

ALL

HLRE

mission, goes not n
There are some w
Jersey product,.but
at present that the
is safe.
CreAmery F

ERY IMAGINABLE FABRIC, PATTERN,
OLOR AND STYLE IDEA FOR MADE-
TO-MEASURE CLOTH ES
ALUE giving is one of the cardinal principles
of this business; and the fact that we've done
lways, and that our customers know it, has
n the real reason for our SUCCESS in making*
:hes that are correct inevery detail of style

I

A striking. example is the martin
creamery, which after a wonderful1
record for four yedrs, made a slip at
the time of our last examination and1
ran a count of more than a million.
Of course this was a surprise to me;.
J but such surprises should-ont be per-
mitted to happen, especially when the
dairy concerned supplies such a large1
boarding house as Freeman's.a
"I believe there are enough people
in Ann Arbor desiring safe raw milk
to be willing to pay the added price
and to have a medical commission to
certify it. This would at once re-j
move the difficulties confronting the
city."
Dr. Wessinger also stated that the
farmers now supplying the creameries;
of An Arbor are not being paid enough
for their product and that if the city
is to protect itself from the danger
6f a milk famine, it should see to it
that they get better rates. This
would prevent in some measure the
shipment of milk to Detroit for sale
as a certified product, which 'now
takes so much of the local supply.

t to have the pleasure of making your

it .

KARL
LIBERTY ST.

M A LCO L M

,w I

/

MALCOLM BLDG.

-I

WHAT'S GOING ON

f

e'

j

''

"Foef~t~ajq
tlhfanc~reo~erdpwajs
boawd ba , hu
tas ol4dsOB&O

;

i.

as sure as you live,

THURSDAY
13:00-Soph lits meet in 205 Mason hall.
5:00- Engineering honor committee
meets in room 301 Engineering build-
ing.
3:30-Michigan naval militia dinner
at Union. ,
7:00-Symphony orchestra tryouts in
School of Music. See Mr. Lockwood.
7:00-Mandolin club tryouts in Lane
hall, not Glee club as previously
stated.
7:00-Mei's Educational club meets
in Union.
7:15-Soph engineers meet in room
348 Engineering building.
FRIDAY
.1:00-Dean Jordan's party for sopho-
more girls in Barbour gymnasium.
7:30-Student Volunteer meeting in
red room, Lane hall.
7:30 Polonla Literary circle meets on
second floor of University Y. M. C. A.
7:30-E-'18 eagineers get-together
for smoker in Union.
SATURDAY
1:30-Fall tryouts for Comedy club
in University hall.
7:30-Bayonne, N. J., club meeting at
Lane hall.
SUNDAY
7:30-Rev. Charles W. Gilkey speaks
on "A Faith for These Times," in
Hill auditorium.
U-NOTICES
Players of the following instruments
are desired for the Varsity Mando-
lin club: mandolin, mandola, gui-
tar, violin, 'cello, and flute. All
members of former clubs must ap-
pear tonight if they wish to play
on the club this year., Freshmen
may tryout at this time also.
All ex-:9 engineers who are interest.
ed in a reunion dinner Friday night
at the Union, should sign up at the
desk in .the Engineering society
rooms.
Students who attend the Congrega-
tional church will hike" up the
river road and have a wiener roast
Saturday, Oct. 11. Men who are go-
ing please leave their names at the
office of Harry G. Mershon in Lane
hall before Friday evening. Women
please phone one of the following:
Marcella Davis, 1112-J; Catherine
Kilpatrick, 2351-J; and -Helen Cady
in Martha Cook dormitory. Party
leaves church at 2 o'clock.
The Baptist Guild Is to have a "hike"
Saturday morning, Oct. 11. Students
are asked to meet at the Guild house
at 5 o'clock. Those who have an 8-
o'clock class can be back in time.
All "What's Going On" and "U-No-
tices" will have to be in before 6:30
o'clock to insure publication
The class in "The Story of the
Bible,",'course III, will have its first
meeting at the Bible Chair House this
evening at 6:30 o'clock. It is open

That undergraduate students who
left the University for war service are
returIing in large numbers to com-
plete their courses is evident from the
large number of applications for mil-
itary credits on file in the office of
Dean J. R. Effinge of the literary col-
lege.
Three hundred and fifty literary
students have been granted credit
hours in consideration of their mili-
tary service and training. There are
pending 200 more applications, which
the c#mmittee will pass upon soon.
Even considering that a number of
those who returned last semester
were graduated in June, it is eident
that at least 400 literary students who
were in the service are now back in
the University. This takes no account
of the large numbers who have re-
sumed their studies in other colleges.
The literary college is ,granting
credits in the shape of a lump num-
ber . of hours, based upon the charac-
ter of the training the applicant re-
ceived while in the service, the prog-
ress made, and the length of service
.rendered.
MUSICIANS FOR VARSITY BAND l
BEST EVER, DECLARES WiLSON
"The men trying out for the V.r-
sity band this year are the best grade
of musicians we have ever had," de-
clared Mr. Wilfred Wilson, director,
at the close of Wednesday .night's
practice.
"For the present we will carry a
band of 60 pieces, and it is my hope
that we can increase this .number
to 75 before the big games. My only
difficulty this year is that I cannot use
all the musicians .of Varsity caliber
who are trying out," he continued.
Eighty men were at last night's
practice.
GORDON SMITH VISITSCITY;
HAS INTERESTING WAR RECoD
Gordon Smith, '17, who spent the
day in Ann Arbor, Wednesday, was the
manager of interscholastic athletics
before the war and was prominent oxi
the campus in other connections. Since
he left to enter the navy at the out-
break of war, he has had an interest-
ing career in naval aviation. He sery-
ed for a timeas an instructor at the
ground schbol at Boston Tech., follow-?
ing which he received his flying train-
ing at Hampton Roads. Following
that period he was engaged in scout-
ing, for submarines off the Atlantic
coast.
FRANCES WESLEY,'20, ELECTED ,
P1ESIDENT OF Y. W. C. A.
Frances Wesley, '20, was elected
president of the Y. W. C. A. at a cab-
inet meeting held Wednesday after-
noon in Newberry hall. Katherine
Loveland, ex-'20, was chosen last
year to hold the offile, but on ac-
count of her marriage last summer
she is not in the University.
Helen Koch, '20, was elected secre-
tary to fill the vacancy caused by the
)failure to iretnrn of Desdemona
Watts, '20, who was elected last year.
CAMP DAVIS PHOTOS MAY BE
SECURED AT INSTRUMENT ROOM
Pictures taken at Camp Davis this
summer are posted in the instrument
room of the Natural Science building
and will be there for four or five days.
Anyone who wishes prints can place
his order with' any member of the
staff of the surveying department. It
is desir4ble that all orders. be given
at once so that the prints can be made
up In one batch.

New Co-operative .Store at Harvard
At Harvard a Co-operative socfety
has been formed, with dues of $1 a
year. Each member receives a num-
ber and every time he buys any-
thing at the "Co-op" the amount is
credited to his name. At the end of
the year each student who has traded
there receives a certain per cent div-
idend. Dividend purchases soon
mount u? for books, stationery sup-
plies, clothing, and furniture can all
be obtained at the "Co-op."
Phi Sigma Holds First Meeting Tonight
Phi Sigma, national honorary bio-
logical society, will hold its first meet-
ing at 7:30, o'clock this evening in
room 161 of the Natural Science build-
ing. Prof. 0. M. Cope of the Medical
school, will speak on "Some Recent
Facts Upon the Heart and Circula-
tion."
Pharmacy Classes to Nominate Officers
All three classes of the pharmacy
college will meet at 4:30 o'clock to-
ri n v in ^^n M ^f he* C "mist"

And Guitars

Gibsons is rather
Large 'just now
But we cannot say
Just how long it

And if you play a
Stringed instrument
We know that

FII1-Slt5 £_ William;

The name

This

Gibson

Will remain

That way since
The Glee and
Mandolin Clubs are
Organized and
Their demands
Will undoubtedly
Make large inroads
On our supply.
(Of course, the

. r
r. . i . .Rnnt

Will mean something
To you.'

Is going to be a

Little talk

Club uses
Gibsons.)

We can show

About

You

A large variety of
Gibsons if you
Come in early.
Now if
There is anything
Else you would

Gibson Mandolins

Our stock of

Like to know

About a
Gibson,

Believe it or not-it's a fact.
That simple, soft foil Fatima
package is today America's most
fashionable package for cigarettes.
Most fashionable because most
widely used by those men who
know "what's what" in smokes.
At the big hotels and clubs, at
smart resorts such as Palm Beach
and Atlantic City-even at New-
port itself-the Fatima package
now holds the prestige formerly
held by the fancy, expensive paste
board box yp

The reason for Fatima's popup
larity is "JUST EN OUGH
TURKISH."
Instead of containing too much
Turkish as do the expensive straight
Turkish cigarettes, Fatima contains
Just enough Turkish-just enough
to taste right and just enough to
leave a man feeling right, even
when he smokes more than usual.
You, too, will be proud of
Fatima's package as soon as you
test Fatima's quality.

Just come in and
See us, or.ask
'A man who

Plays one.
He knows.

nthd

1I

F ATIMA
A Sensible Cgarette

Mrs. AI.

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