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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 09, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE P

11U71.

.r' Pugilist And Fight Referee
Charge Of Union Tap Room

'!

tierj

"Mickey" Shea, so called not from
any connection with the famous rac-
ing cinema by that name but because
of actual experience in the more real-
istic sport of boxing, has been selected
as manager of the tap room in the
Union, and he has been on duty for
some time.
<In this time "Mickey' has raanaged
to get the fountain started and has
secured a patronage for his business,
which some people, seeing it crowded
to capacity after the Case game, say
will soon rival Larry's famous estab-
lishment.. Ic
Shea's one desire is'to make the tap'
room oe of the most popular places
on the campus. During past years he
has had much experience in the busi-
ness, and he promises his prospective
patrons that they will, be able to se-

irn

- I

-For-
FRESH FRUIT SUNDAES
FRESH FRUIT SODAS
HOME MADE CANDIES
Fresh Daily
HOT CHOCOLATE
Visit the
The Sugar Bowl
109 S. MAIN STREET

COMPLETE LINE
OF
FURNISHIINGS

cure practically anything they want.
"Near beer" will be served in ice cold
mugs, cooled in a refrigerator at the
back of the fountain.
To serve the beer, hundred of mugs
have been .purchased, the shelves in
the supply room being filled with them.
Other fashiona'ble drinks such as apri-
cot rickeys, will be served, and while
the kick is absent, "Mickey" says that
they are certainly appetizing. All
drinks are being served over the tap
room bar at the usual prices, minus,
however, the war tax, In all his trav-
els ~over the country "Mickey" says
that he has seen nothing like the Mich-
igan tap room. According to him, it
is the best ever, and he plans to make
the service equal to if not better than
the room. Girl dispensers have been
engaged to 4ispense the drinks.
As no ladies wil. be served in the
,room except on dance nights, the men
will have privacy in the tap room.
When the tables arrive, it will re-
semble an old wine room, and in keep-
Ing with this environment "Mickey" in-
tends to mae the tap room a lounging
place for students. "You do not have
to buy anything if you don't want to,"
said "Mickey." "Just come down and
sit around."
To have the place a campus social
center, "Mickey' plans to make the
place a sporting headquarters. He Is
doing this because of his great inter-
est in sports, boxing, golfing, baseball,
football, and wrestling being the chief
interests of his life. Following any
big sporting event"Mickey" will have
the returns posted in tle tap room
soon after it is over.
Any debate on any important matter
in the, sport world, -expecialy boxing
or wrestling,can be settled by bring-
ing the matter to "Mickey." And if
such a thing is done, as it probably
will be many times, the students can
be assured that they will hzave a com-
petent judge.
For nine years previous to his be-
coming a referee in 1905, "Mickey"
boxed throughout the country as a
feeitherweight. Anyone shaking hands
with him will realize that he has an
extraordinarily chubby and strong
hand.His greatest 'reputation was'
made as a boxing referee, however.
The most unusual testimony of his
ability was shown when he refereed for
two years in New Orleans. This may
not seem unusual, but as "Mickey"
was the only man- outside of a New
Orleans citizen to referee a. bout there,
one can see how able he was.
"Mickey" did .most of his decision
work in and around Kanisas City and'
St. Louis, although h has also work-
ed in New York, Phadelphia, and oth-
er places. During the time spent as
a referee, he has refereed many cham-
pionship battles, the Nelson-Dale, Wol-
gast-Nelson fights being two of them
He..has also worked in the ring. with
such men as Kilbane, Atel, Coulon,
Dmpey, Dan Ket ell, Fulten, and
many others.
As a natural result of this past word
"Mickey" is extremely interested in
boxing and wrestling, and if he can
obtain the support of the men, ie
hopes to revive interest in the old Un-
iversity boxing club, which died out
when tlie war started. Shea is well;
pleased with Ann Arbor, and he in-
tends to make it his home.

NEW STUDENTS REQUIRET
TO tAEPHYICL EXAM
WORK.IN CHARGE OF HEALTH'
SERVICE AND GYMNASIUM
AU THORITIES
Every first year man in- the Uni-
versity, even though he is entering,
with advanced credit, is required to
take a compulsory physical examina-
tion this year. Such examination had
been linited previously to freshmen
in thme gymnasium classes, but a vote
of the Board of Regents extended the
requirement.
About 80. men a day are receiving
their examinations in Waterman gym-
nasium. The work is in charge,- of
the combined Health service and gym-
nasium authorities, and the examina-
tion given is more complete -than the
army tests.
Appointments for examinations are
made at the treasurer's 'office when
the new man pays his fees. Every man
is to be held rigidly to his appoint-
ment and anyone not keeping the ap-
pointment will be followed up by a
letter from the authorities, laying him-
self open to the suspicion of conceal-
ing some defect or illness. Persons
who through misadvertance were not
given appointments are requested to
come to the gymnasium for their ex-
aminations.
The examinations to date have done
a great deal in revealing to studente
physical defects which they did not
know existed. This is especially true
o.r the discovery of eye troubles which
might have made study impossible
later on and also of conta ious skin
diseases. These troubles and many
other defects, which in some cases are
very serious, are treated at once by
the Health service.

DeansCooley Leafes for New York --
Dean Mort:mer E. Cooley left Tues-
day night to attend the meeting of the_1
A. M. S. C. in New York City. He
intends stopping over in Buffalo and
then proceeding to New York.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or smaU.
The Ann Arbor Savings Dank
Incorporated 1864
Capital and Surplus. A :0. 4 i)"
Resourees .......* 4.0.O4,Ic.tin
Northwest Cor Main & Ioiirnr
707 North Univrat- va.

.ARRC
7'RQY TfAIL(
SOFT CqLL
FIT WELL-LOO
--WASH EA$!LY
CL&ei, I~abo y & Co., /nc.

V.,'

Patronize the Daily Adv(
T.. rubey 's
Dinners. Lunches Confectior
Ice Cream, Delicious Sodas
We Make our own Cream
Orders solicited from Fraternities
Sororities. 218 S. Main Phone

Comforts for the R(

FORk
COLILEGE
MEN

Eniern

News]

BATH-ROBES
and

Hats
Caps
Shirts
etc.

..

N
k,
x
:
'$-

F

ERY SHOP
Jniversity Ave.

Michigan's oldest student publica-
tion, the Technic, will be out about
Oct. 25, according to Frederick W.
Parsons, '20E; managing elitor. The
first issue will contain articles by
members of the engineering faculty,
as well as technical papers by outside
men.
Prof. Walter L. Badger of the chem-
ical engineering department, will con-
tinue his discussion of modern chem-
ical exaporators begun in the issue
of last May. "The Engineer's Part in
the War," will be the subject of an
illustrated article by Prof. A. H. Lov-
ell. Prof. Clarence T. Johnston, di-
rector of Camp Davis, will describe the
work done at the camp this 'Ammer.
Prof. Emil Lorch, head of the archi-
tectural college, reports that many of
his former students who left to enter
the service have returned to continue
their work with greater interest in
art and architecture. "The architec-
tural masterpieces that these men saw
in France and Belgium served to stim-
ulate enthusiasm for the work, with
the result that many graduates decided
to continue their architectural studies
on arriving hone," states Professor
Lorch.
All ex-'8E's are asked to sign up
at the Tec$hnic office for a smoker and
get-together to be held at 7:30 o'clock
Friday evening at the Union. Talks,
eats, and music are promised.
No nominations for class .flicers
were made at the freshman engineers
assembly yesterday morning, as Prof.
A. C. Hoad who is in charge of' the
assemblies, advised postponing nom-
inations until the men were better ac-
quainted with one another.,

Imported Materials

TINKER & COMPA
CLOTHES, FURNISHINtGS AND H,
So. State St. at William 5t.
We make a speciatV 6f Evening C

I.

pencil work. Use a
Lng responsive lead
:ens your pencil tasks
more pleasurable -

r.owforweiy ned

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OLIkt . I on

Today and Tomorrow

(oh you
Baby vamp)

The Screen

ATiONERS-AT SCHOOL AND IN TOWN

I SHOWING

I

BRYANT
WASHBURN
IN.
t"PUTTING
OVIER"
ADDED ATTRACTION
"He Married His
Wife"
Also
BRAY PICTOGRAPH
and
MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA

TIIE ARCADE,
Olive Thomas in "Upstairs and
Down" will be the attraction at the
Arcade today and tomorrow. As a
"baby vamp," Miss Thomas puts a
quiet house party in disorder and con-
fusion with something happening at
every hour of the day and long into
the hours of the night. She flirted
with everybody in sight, upstairs and
dewn. In desperation her fiance set
a trap to stop her. It snapped and
somebody was caught. The picture is
loaded with action and there is a thrill
every minute.
The plot is taken from the play of
the same name by Frederick and'
Fanny Hatton.
THE MAJESTIC
"The Girl of Red Butte," featuring
Dorothy Dalton, will be shown at the
Majestic today and tomorrow. The
story offers Miss Dalton splendid op-'
portunities in acting and is one of her
most popular releases.
ADELPHI DEBATING SOCIETY.
POSTPONES ITS OPEN HOUSE
Adelphi House of Representatives,
campus debating society, held its reg-
ular meeting Tuesday night at the
society rooms in University hall. The
open house which had been set for this
week has been postponed until 7:30
o'clock Tuesday night of next week.

Sophomore engineers will hold their
first class meeting at 7:15 o'clock this
evening in room 348. Nominations for
class officers and other business will
be disposed of.
UNION TO CALL EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE INTO SESSION
Consisting of all the officers of the
Union, the chairmen of committees,
and the general secretary and gen-
eral manager, an executive committee
will be called into session for the
first time this year. At stated times
throughout the University year this
body will assemble and consider
problems of Union management and
ways and means for using the build-
ing.
Jurisdiction over many of the house
problems will be given to the commit-
tee, and it will discuss various ways
to which the Union building can be
put to use. Aid will be given other
societies by pointing out how the
Union can help them. All-the activ-
ities will be based on co-operation
with other organizations.
The decisions of the committee as
to what it thinks should be done will,
be placed in the hands -of the board

INHER
FIRST
PICTURE
vA

.

From cellar to garreV-
la.4 h on ever's e
"There Is no more Beautiful Girl on
Screen Than Olive Thomas, The Clever
.much-admired Star of Selznick Pictu;
Pictorial Review.
Coming--Sunday-Monday,Anniversity Spi
&st -1- - 2 s. it W% 04-

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