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March 06, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,'SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 1920.

PRICE

....
___.._ ti , , ;

If

RussellBequeaths University $io,ooo
Faculty Salary liund;tinion $2,500

IRISH SITUATION
BECOMES SERlIOUS

lUILLI
IDENT

RATIFY

AC-

JEJ

Ear Wison
Com.

ociated Press)
March 5.-With anoth-
atify the peace treaty
Democratic senlators
o seek personal con-
President Wilson be-
e vote is taken.
k'now definitely how
> in endorsing a com-
o a 'clear understand-
ew on the treaty as a
shduld another' sen-
rce it into politics. -
ats are understood
iat measures the Pres-
pect congress to take
country of the war
decision on the treaty
'TUNES FOR
DID IT" CAST
rS TAKEN FOR 192
BY VAN HORN;
BY BACHMAN

fume measurements for the cast
horus of "George Did It" were
Friday at the Union by two'rep-!
atives of Van Horn and com-'
of Philad'elphia, who at the same
submitted samples of goods.
11 192 costumes were ordered,.
rements being taken for the
s, stockings, and shoes.
costumes will be made accord-
designs, which have been
by Reed Bachman, '20, who al-
igned the poster for the opera.
plates of the designs will be
I and displayed at the Union
near future.
unusually large order was giv-
a year, due to the number of
es which certain members of
>mpany must make caused by
e of time of 60 years between
ro acts. Some of the company
hange costumes six times.
costumes should arrive about a
before the first performance,
is April 5. Rehearsals for the
,nd chorus are being held daily,
trials 1h the afternoon and
g rehearsals in the evening. E.
ser Shuter, director, stated that
;e Did It" was further advanc-
rard production than last year's
was at the same relative time.
[DENT H. B.HUTCHINS DID
T SIGN COUNCIL PETITION
to an inadvertent error, it was
nced in yesterday's Daily that
r. Petty, '21, as chairman of the
ttee in charge of the Student
J's petition for the use of Hill
rium for political speakers, had
nced President Harry B. lutch-
gning of the petition. Petty is
corresponding secretary and
presented ,the petition to the
ent who has not signed it. C.
:tum, '20E, is chairman of the
ttee in charge of the petition.
GRADUATION NOTICE

Among the bequests in the will of
-henry Russell, '75, are two of direct
eneflt to the University of Michigan.
The first is the sum of $10,000 to
orm an endowment fund to provide,
zdditoinal compensation for members
f the University faculty.
The other gift, amounting to $2,500,
is for the Michigan Union. The unique
part of the gift, according to Homer
Heath, general manager of the Un-
'ion, is the fact that it is only the
ADD EQUIPMENT TO
ENGIN4ERING SHOPS
' Equipment valued at $9,500 when
new has recently been purchased by
the engineering shops from the United
States salvage department. The ma-
chines which have been received so
far consist of an Oakley grinder, a
Garvin universal milling lathe; a
heavy Milwaukee production miller, a
Sidney lathe, a Sandblast apparatus
and an Avery high-speed drill.
According to Prof. John Airey this
equipment in its present condition is
worth at least 75 per cent of the cost
price or over $7,00. The purchases
were made under the regulation of the
Caldwell bill, "which provides for the
sale of n~achine tool equipment to
educational institutions at a price of
15 per cent of cost. Professor Airey
further ptates that the Caldwell bill
has been a great boon to the engi-
neering shops as practically no equip-
ment had been received during the
last 10 years. .
INN ARBOR i LGIUSESS
Whirlwind passing and accurate
basketshooting in th last few min-
utes failed to win for Ann Arbor in
the game with Hyde Park Friday
night. The Chicago boys won the fin-
a verdict 28 to 24.
Ann Arbor Starts Fast
At the start 4nn Arbor took a nine
point lead, which Hyde Park slowly
cut down, the count at the end of the
half being 14 each. Weed, ponter of
the local team, featured t'he game
with his clever basketshoting, and
Gregory with his general floor play-
ing.
The Chicago team got away to a
five point advantage in ' the second
period, with Simmons starring, and
although 'the Ann Arbor team was
wthin two points of the visitors
practically all the time they were un-
able to take the lead'.
Game Speedy'
The game as a whole was fast and
well played, Ann Arbor carrying away
the honors at all points save in cover--
ing under the basket, where the Chi-
cago team was able to throw nearly
all of the winning scores.
Summary:
An Arbor Hyde Park
Gregory ......L.F..........La Pook
Yutzy .......R.F....Holt, Balhattet
Weed ........C............. ..Epple
Bayliss .......L.G.............Clause
MacGregor .R.G.......Simmons
Hutzel
Baskets, Weed 6, Balhattet 5, Ep-
ple 4, Gregory 2, Yutzy 2, Simmons
3, Hutzel. Fouls, Weed 2-4, La Pook
4-9. Refleee, Mather.
Chadnges in Classes
Economies M6A

Prof. Henry C. Adams' course in
Economics 36A will meet at 10 o'clock=
Monday in room 104, Economics build-
ing.
LAWS ELECT L. D. LARKE AND
F. L. WALTERS AS COUNCILMEN
As the result of elections held in
the Law building Friday morning,
Frank 'L. Walters, '21L, was elected
councilman to represent the junior
law class.
Lawrence D. Larke, '20L, was elect-"
ed as senior law councilman.l
John Drinkwater Sails for England
New York, March 5.-John Drink-
water, the English poet and play-
wright, author of "Abraham Linco'ln,"1
sailed for Livernool yesterday. -

secopid instance of money being will-
ed to the Union. The first case was
when the sum' of $100 was willed to
the/ Union by Logan Cheek, '10L,
whose home was in Kentucky. That
was when the Union occupied the
Judge Cooley residence and was not
much more than in its infancy..
"Mr. Russell was generous in his'
gifts to the Union, since this sum
brings the amount he has given to a
total of $10,000. When the first cam-
paign started he gave $2,500 and again
during the campaign last fall increas-
ed this amount by $5,000 more."
Nothing had been communicated to
'the Union Friday regarding Mr. Rus-
sell's gift, the only information con-
cerning it at present being newspaper
accounts. Another bequest was one
of $1,000 to the belta Kappa Epsilon-
chapter here.
OPINIO FAVOR
MOCKCONVNTIO

Rebellion

of 1916 Leaves
Spirit High in
Ireland

i

Malignant

/
Professors Advocate Participation
National Affairs By Stu-
dents

in

PLAN -TO FORM CLUBS
FOR LEADING CANDIDATES
General opinion on the campus
seems to favor the holding of a mock
political convention.,
Dean Henry M. Bates strongly fav-
ors the idea, believing participation
and interest in public affairs makes
for better citizenship. "American pol-
itics demands the participation-of un-
iversity men as never before," .said
the dean, "and in these discussions
principles should be emphasized, r'ath-
er than petty politics.",.
Would Select Delegates
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, favored
the selection of about 600 delegates,
who would occupy the main floor of
Hill auditorium. In addition to prac-
tice in speaking, Professor Trueblood
believes that the insight into the big
affairs of the day would prove valu-
able.
Professor Robert T. Crane thought
the convention would be a splendid
thing. He favpred the' formation of
various clubs for allleading candi-
dates. Each club to work for .their
candidate as in a real convention.
George Hurley, '18L, pointed out
three major advantages arising from
a convention of this character, (1)
provision of a medium to bring the
ouestions at issue before the stu-
dents: (2) stimulation of interest in
the affairs of the nation; (3) practice
in sneaking' and in the conducting of
such a political institution.
LATE WIRE BRIEFS
(By Associated Press)
New York, March 5.-The railway1
executive association today appointed
a committee to confer with represent-
atives of the railroad Brotherhood on
wages and workift conditions. The
action was taken in response to a re-
quest by President Wilson.
It is expected Director General
Hines will call the first conference
for next Wednesday.
London, March' 5.-Serious riots at
Munich and Straubink, 75 miles north-
east of Munich arising out of demands1
for complete freedom and the distri-
bution of foodstuffs, are reported
from Berlin.
Arrests -by the profiteering court
led the mob into conflict with the
troops, one person was killed and
many injured.
Washington,, March 5. - Peter W.
Summers, an American citizen, has
'been kidnapped by Mexicans rebels at
Salina Cruz, Mexico, according to a
dispatch today to the state depart-
ment here.
The dispatch says Summers. was
held for a ransom of 1,000 pesos. Sum-
mers is a former resident of Paw Paw,
Michigan.
Washington, March 6.-Dr. Cary T.
Grayson, has forbidden the Presi-
dent to indulge in a round of golf, on
the President's favorite links in. Vir-
ginia. The doctor reports that it1
will be several weeks before the Pres-

PHERSON SAYS 200,000 SINN
FEINNERS READY FOR ACTION
(By Associated Press)
ILondon, March 5.-h The Graphic
features a Dublin dispatch saying that
the Irish situation is changing re-
markably. The dispatch declares that
nothing can avert a fresh ;tragedy ex-
cept the utmost coolness on the part
of authorities and that any increase
in the rigor, of martial law will in-
evitably precipitate such a tragedy,
causing dangerous complications for
England and America.
200,00 Men Prepared
Ian Pherson, chief secretary for Ire-
land, defending the Irisht adwinistra-
tion in the House of Commons, says,
"It is obvious we are up against a
tremendougly dangerous situation in
Ireland." He added that the Sinn
Fein had at least 200,000 men prepared
to commit murder at any hour of the
day or night.
Spirit More Malignant
Secretary Pherson asserted ;he had
received letters from royalists in the
West and South of Ireland begging the
government to take steps to get them
out of the country
The Easter rebellion in 191.6 has
not been stamped out, he said, and
had left behind it a spirit more ma-
lignant and revolutionary than Ire-
land had ever known before.
TWO ARIAN SHIPS
EPO ED IN ISTRESS

MARMADOAC
OFF

WASHED ASHORE
DELAWARE
COAST

(By Associated Press)
Norfolk, Virginia, March 5. - The
American shipping board steamship
Marmodoack is ashore and in distress
tonight off the Delaware coast and
calling for assistance by radio.
A coast- guard cutter immediately
put to sea in answer to the call. A
50-mile wind is sweeping the coast
and increasing in velocity.
Another American freighter, the Or-
ient, was driven ashore at Willough-
by Beach and was resting broadside in
a precarious position.
Warning of severe north and north-
east gales along the Atlantic coast
steamer lanes tonight and tomorrow
were issued late today .by the wesather
bureau.
FORM LOWDEN CLUB;, REGENT
DEAL ADDRESSES MEMBERS1
Organization of the Lowden for
President club was completed at a
meeting addressed by Junius E. Beal,
regent of the University, last night.
T. H. Lowder, 122L, an Illinois su-
porter of Lowden, assembled the meet-
ing. G. W. Struckman, '20L, was
elected president of the club, and L.
B. Daume, '20L, secretary. J. P. Ball-
man, '21, was appointed a committee of
one to assist the officers.
Regent Beal spoke of Frank O. Low-
den as the' young man's and the busi-
ness man's candidate. He said he had
known him since he was in college
as an enthusiastic, but. still a sane
leader of 'men.
He also spoke of Hiram Johnson
coming here on March 16 and said he
expected to get Lowden here later.
The club 'plans on an active cam-
paign in the coming mock political'
.convention on the campus.
Archs to Hold Smoker March 8
Talks by Prof. Arthur E. Wood, of
the sociology department, ,and Prof.
Herbert R. Cross, of the fine arts de-
partment, and interpretive dancing
by Miss Jeannette Kruszka will fea-
ture the program at' an Architectural
smoker at 8 o'clock .next Wednesday
evening in the Union.
Professor Wood will speak on the
"Sociological Aspect of the Housing
Problem," and the subject of Profes-
sor Cross' talk will be "The Trend of
Modern Architecture."
Ike Fischef's orchestra will plat'and
refreshments and smokes will be
served.

MANY ENGINEERING
POSITIONS UOPE N
"The June crop of electrical engi-
neers is already tentatively plac-
ed," said Prof. John Parker, head of
the electrical engineering depart-
ment. "We are receiving requests
every day from such concerns as th3
Bell Telephone company, the General
Electric company, the Westinghouse
people and many more, all asking for
men, The salaries of these positions
provide a living wage and better, and
offer excellent opportunities for ad-
vancement."
Need Chemists
In the chemical engineering depart-
ment among the 30 notable firms who
have sent men i here during the
past two months are Buick, Chevro-
let, Maxwell, Studebaker, Remington,
and Swift companies. "'Phere are
many more positions than' men," tsaid
Prof. A. E. White, head of the chem-
ical engineering department. "Sala-
ries depend upon the man and his ex-
perience. The inquiries from these
firms are all unsolicited."
APPERS TONIGHT
Author of "Sunshine and Awkward-
ness" Brought Here by Ora-
torieal Associaon
HAS BEEN A HUMORIST
FOR PAST TWENTY YEARS
Lovers of good humor will have a
chance to hear a noted humorist when
Strickland W. Gillilan begins his pro-
gram at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill aud-
itorium. "Strick," as hli popularly
known throughout the country, is a
member of the Lyceum circuit and has
been engaged in this work for the past
20 years.-
Is Foremost Humorist
Mr. Gillilan is called America's fore-
most humorist. He is also a. well-
known magazine writer, and spet 25!
years of his life in newspaper work.
He is the writer of several books, the
best known being "A Sample Case of
Humor" and "Sunshine and Awkward-
ness."
The lecture tonight is under the
auspices of the Oratorical society.
Film to Sho
War Conditions
With "The Heritage of France," the
big war aftermath film to be shown at
7:30 Wednesday 'evening, in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall, under the au-
spices of the Women's league, comes
Miss Grace Parker for an interpreta-
tive lecture.
Miss' Parker, as national command-
ant of the national league for women's
work during the war is in' a position
to have authoritative knowledge of
heisubject, for this organization in-
itiated much of the war work of Am-
erican women and nearly half a mil-
lion volunteers served under it dur-
ing the war.
The speech and film portray con-
ditions in the war torn areas in
France and also shows the relief work
done by the American committee for
devastated France. The campaign
has been enthusiastically received and

has been given high . commenda-
tion by some of the most representa-
Dtive men in both America afid France.'
HOLLAND WILL NOT ALLOW
EX'ADITION OF KAISER
Declares Status Different Than Other
Countries as She is Not Party
to Treaty
(By Associated Press)
The Hague, March 5.-In refusing
for the second time to deliver the
former German emperor to the Allies
'for trial the Dutch ggvernment says
it appreciates the motives actuating
the 4.1ies but is unable to change
its previous decision.,
It says it is not forgetful of the
inhuman acts committed during the
war but since Holland is not a party
to the Versailles treaty the Queen's
government finds itself in a different
position ftom other powers with re-
eard to these acts.

FACULTY SUPPORl
DISCUSSIONS
H-LL AUDITORI

I

DEAN BATES, PROFS. JRU
CRANE A.ND REEVES HOLD
POLITICS ESSENTIAL
POLITICS MIGHT PROVE
AC ADEMIC STIMUM
Professors Acquainted with Petrt
See No Objection to Its
Phasing
As a result of the announcem
that the petition, drawn up by I
Student council at their last meet:
requesting the use of Hill auditori
for political discussions Is to go
fore the Board of Regents March
a consensus of faculty oplnibn on'
subject has been gathered from me
bers conversant 'with the politics
the day. Everyone of the tabu
questioned as to their attitudei4'
matter was firmly in 'favor of gra
ing. this permission.
Dean Bates Favors Plan \
It was not conceded that th
should be an open forum establis
as a result of this sought-after pri
lege, creating a place of parti
wrangling, but it was held by th
interviewed that the auditori
should be made an assembly for
giving of speeches in keeping with
conservative policy of the Uulvers
Dean Henry M. Bates of the I
school said, "I favor the opening
Hill auditorium to responsible org
izations for the discussion of pul
questions, provided such discussi
be limited to the sincere and c
structive consideration of such pr
lems and to the exclusion of misc)
making propaganda."
Intimacy 'with Polities Desired
Aside from the desirability of
proposition it was deemed the dut
the University to the student body
provide some adequate provision
its attendance at the discussions
vital questions which it was stated
really an important part of" - libe
education. It was contended byP
J. R. Brumm of the rhetoric dept
ment that as a part of a balanced
ucation an intimacy with the curr
affairs of the world should b a
of every student's training. rofes
Brumm also believed that there wo
be a reaction on the 'part of the s
dents permitted to hear the count
greatest speakers in the form' of
more practical interest in their ac
emic pursuits.
University Should Teach Politic
Prof. R. T. Crane of the poli
science department, who, has alw
been heartily in favor of student
terest in politics, hoped that the
tition would be favorably accep
because he stated that as citizens
should not be denied a place of g
eral meeting for our political enlig
enment. "College people, as an e
cated class, should lead the count
biggest issues and the University
failing to do what it should in not
cluding politics in some form as
course of study."
"There is nothing in such a p
tion that I can see as obectionab
said Prof. J. S. Reeves of the pol
cal science department. "There
possibly 5,000 voters in the Univer
and it would certainly further the
terests of this body to be infor
of the great discussions of the
when reasonably presented," he a
ed. That the addresses be in keep
with the policy of the University a
one of Professor Reeves' stipulatik
All the faculty members who g
their opinions on the feasibilit"of

council's petition knew its text E
each thought that there was noth
to take exception to in its phrasi
SOPH ENGINEER BASKETEERS
WIN OVER : DENTS 17 TO
Sophomore engineers defeated
underclass dents by the score of
to 14 in a closely contested game
the interclass basketball league.
Crawford, Hickey and Ling, si
red for the engineers while Richar

nmmittee in charge of
ement invitations, and
ments has wanted an
of time. Seniors who
procured thee invita-
do so in the main cor-
University hall from
o'clock on Monday,
nouncements are pric-
cents and the invita-

i

, jtLt

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