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March 05, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-05

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 5, 1920. ,

PRICE THREE C

. _ ..

2 Faculty lMen
Indian Chiefs
The. Tribe of Michigamua was hon-
ored last night at the fourth sleep
of the Moon of Lions and Lambs when
the active braves and honorary sach-
ems initiated Pres. Harry B. Hutchins
and Prof. Herbert C. Sadler of the
engineering college into honorary
membership.
Bearmeat was served to the honor-
ary sachems, old braves, fightint
braves, and the two selected palefaces
on the third floor of the Michigan Un-
ion after which the tribe sojourned to
the tribal wigtam in the top tower
room. Here words of wisdom were
spoken by Heap Think Wenley and
responses heard from the initiates.
Friendly ChiefCooley, Great Builder
Bates, and Battle Finder Bartelme

Real Ability Is Shown by School of
Music Organization in
Initial Concert

U. S. MEDICAL STUDENTS TOO OLD AT
GRAIUATION SAY UNIVERSITY DOCTORS

..

xII S

ETHELYN ETZ AIDS
WITH SEVERAL R1,ADINGS

(By Marguerite Clark);
Music lovers of the campus .and city
were rewarded,. after picking their
way through the storm last evening
to the High School auditorium, by en-
joying the highest class musical con-
cort that has been given by students

,

this year.

'1

the left, the two palefaces gathe~r-
1 romthose whose numbers are as
e leaves of the forest, and. Wise
hief Hutchins and Canoe' Builder
adler, pronounced sachems of the
ribe of Michigamua.

II'TART WAR
PROHIBITION

iu

use Repulses Initial Attack in Form
of Rider to Appropriation '.
BUil, 284 to 86
D RAISE ISSUE AGAIN, SAY
ANTI-PROHIBITION )EMBERS
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 4.-Siege war-
re against the prohibition enforce-
ent act was inaugurated today by
e "wet" members of the house.
Although repulsed 254 to 86 in the
itial, attack which .was made in the
rm of a straight-out repeal provi-
m, offered by Representative Ea-

emociat, New Jersey, as a
the legislative, executive,
, appropriation bill.
anti-prohibitionists told
they plan to raise the i

rid-
and
the
ssue!

Program Balanced
Under the supervision and direc-
tion of Miss Maude Kleyn, of the
School of Music faculty, the Univer-
sity Schoo of Music Girls' .Glee club
gave a well balanced program which
was received by a most appreciative
audience. Miss Ethelyn Metz, of Hol-
land, who is a graduate of the Com-
stock School of Oratory in Evanston,
Ill., assisted by giving numerous se-
lections; Margaret, Foote, '2i, Neva
Nelson, '21, and Sophia Wolozynski,
'22, accompanied on the violin, and
Miss Wilma Seedorff, at the piano.
In "Cossack Lullaby," and "The
Snow," sung by the Glee club, the
shading and attack were very unus-
ual. "Springtime," the last number
on the program, was the most beau-
tiful of all. One encore was wonder-
fully clever, both in interpretationand
theme; it was entitled "The Cate-
chist" and was played on words into
"The Cat He Kissed."
Enunelation Perfect
Miss Kleyn's splendid work as di-
rector was proven throughout the pro-
gram in the perfect enunciation of the
singers, and careful interpretation of
minute meanings. The concert was
different, too, because 'of fitting co#-
tuming'for many of the songs. For
instance, in "Tao Loved His Li," sung,
by the Midnight Daughters' iquartet,
richly embroidered Japanese regalias
were worn; in "Just Like a Gypsy," by
Flora Kelley, Helen Marshall, and
Catherine Coburn, very picturesque
gypsy dress was seen; and in "Spin-
ning 'Song," by the Glee club, a real,
entique.spinning wheel was used on
the stage.
Reader Encored
The many encores accorded Miss
Metz readings showed the/ great ap-
preciation of the audience. They
seemed to especially enjoy "An Inter-
national Courtship" and two French-
Canadian selections-"Mon Pierre"
and "The Circus at Old St. Anne's."
Great variety, splendid voices, and
unusual finish in every detail made
,the concert an unprecedented puc-
cess.
Lowden Backers
T0 Meet Tonight
All students interested in the for-
mation of 'a Lowden-for-President
club are requested to be present -at~
a meeting to be held in the reading
room of the Union at 7:15 o'clock to-
night;
It. is expected that there will be
strong organization grow out of the
meeting, as considerable support for
"Illinois' Favorite Son" is in evidence
on the campus.

That the average medical studentx
in this country is too old' when he1
graduates, is a fact endorsed by Dr.c
Hugh M. Beebe, of the Homoeopathict
hospital here.t
"The present age of the medical1
graduate," says Dr. Beebe, "is large-
ly due to the fact that in bis pre-
medical work he unnecessarily dupli-
cates courses he has already had in
the high school."c
English Graduate 26 -
Contrasting conditions in Europeanc
universities and those ;in the United
States, Dr. -Beebe states that where-
as the age of the average medical
graduate student in England and Ger-
Locate Nel/ Stars
By Photogaphy
The fact that several new stars
have been located in the past few
months by the comparison of photo-
graphic plates at the Harvard uni-
versity is not indicative of anything
out of the ordinary, says Prof. Wil-
liam J. Hussey, director of the Ob-
servatory. They are without doubt
examples of the temporary stars that
frequently fash into prominence an
then slowly fade away.
Professor Hussey states that the
photographs- are taken by a camera
that automatically focuses itself on
different parts of the heavens after
an exposure is made. While Harvard
observatory is the only one that has
the equipment to photograph the en-
tire heavens, Michigan has obtained
many photographs of unusual merit
of individual spectrum.
Partial eclipse of the sun will 'oc-
cur on May 17, and again on Nov.
10, the first being invisible and 'the
latter. visible in the afternoon in
these parts. A total eclipse of the
moon will occur on the evening of
M 2 and also on the evening of
Oc 26,' both being invisible here.
Though a hard cold winter has just
been' experienced for the past few
months the lowest that the thermom-
f eter registered was eight degrees be-
low zero.
J- LITS NOMINATE
MEN FOR COUNCIL
Elect Celan H. Rorick As Baseball
Manager for Season
Theodore C. Sedgwick, '21, Edward
S. Kingsford, '21, and Donald J. Pert-
er, '21, were chosen as candidates for
the Student council at a Ieeting of
the junior lit class called yesterday
afternoon in University Hall. These
men will be voted on from 10 o'clock
until 5 o'clock next, Thursday after-
noon in the corridor of University
hall.
Celan H. Rorick, '21, was elected
baseball manager for the class.
After the treasure's report had
been read, the class voted to set the
annuhl class dues 'at $1. Dues will
be payable from 10 o'clock until 5
o'clock next Thursday and Friday in
the corridor of 'University hall.
The social committee reported that
arrangements had been made for a
dance to be held from 2:30 until 5:30
o'clock on Saturday, March 13,( at the
Union. Officers and members of the
class-"will have tickets for the dance
tomorrow, and they 'may be secured
from any of these men.f
PROF. CROSS GIVES ILLUSTRATED
LECTURE IN DET1(OIT TODAY
Prof. Herbert R. Cross, of the fine
arts department, will continue the se-

ries of weekly extension lectures in
Detroit Friday afternoon when he- will
give an illustrated lecture before the
Woman's Guild of St. Paul's cathe-
dral on "St. Paul in Art."
The object of the talk is to pre-
sent' a review of some of the more
important places in history of art that
show the character and events from
the life,, of the great apostle.

many is 26, the medical student here
is 28 or 29 years of age at the time
of his graduation: The reason for
this is that the preparatory work of
the European student is shorter than
his American neighbor's, although it
is as fully complete.-
Michigan Student 28
"The average age of the medical
graduate in Michigan is between 28
or 29," leclares Dr. Beebe. Asked
what he would do to remedy this con-
dition, he said that he would advocate
shortening of the high school eourse.
Dr. Christopher G: Parnall, medical
superintendent of University hospital,
states as his opinion that the length
of time-now necessary for a man to
pursue the profession of medicine is
a detriment which prevents him from
entering the profession.
Excludes Desirables-
"This has the effect of keeping out
many men who would b very desir-,
able practitioners," says Dr. Parnell.
"If this continues, only the well-to-
do may look forward to entering the
medical profession.'
"On the other hand, a man lought
to be thoroughly trained. Medicine is
being increasingly recognized as a-
state function, and it is only logical
to assume that the state should con-
tribute a share in he preparation of
the student for h#i life work."
Dr. Parnall also declares that al-
though medial students in his time
were younger than those of today
they were inadequately prepared
6E CONFERENCE
BEGINS NEXT REEK
Bi-Partisan Committee to Consider
,Pay Demands of 2,000,000 RaIl-
road Workers
HEADS OF 15 UNIONS WILL
BE.1bABOR REPRESENTATIVES
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 4. - Wage de-
mands of 2,000,000 railroad workers
will be taken up anew early next week
when representatives of the brother-
hood meet officials of the corporations
in the first conference on the wage
problem.
\The employes will be1 represented
during the preliminary sessih by the
'heals of 15 unions who have fought
the wage battle together since last
August.
1 Session Will Be Informal
Representativeskof the railroad ex-
ecutives will be selected probably to-
morrow. Sessions of the bi-partisan
'committee will meet largely inform-
ally for several days, and it will re-
quire time to agree on proceedure.
The number of members to sit per-
manently on the bi-partisan confer-
once also will be determined at in-
formal meeting.
Continuation of Negotiations
Brotherhood leaders probably will
insist that negotiations begin where
they left off when the roads ,were re-
turned to private control.
DRAKE SPEAKS TO CLASSICAL
CLUB; PLAN ANNUAL PARTY
Prof. J. H. Drake of the Law school,
addressed the Classical club in Alum-
ni Memorial hall last night, discussing
the important part of a classical ed-
ucation in professional fields.
It was decided in a short business
meeting, immediately following the
address of the evening, that the an-

nual function of the club would take'
the sform of a dance for the mem-
bers, and a play to be open to the gen-
eral public. Both of these will take
place shortly after Spring vacation..
SOPHOMORE PROM COMITTEE
PLACES BAN ON ALL FLOWERS

SUPPORT RALLIES.
FORPETITION TO
REQUEST FOR POLITICAL USE OF
HILL AUDITORIUM WIDELY
FAVORED
INVITATIONS EXTENDED
TO .SPEAKERS BY UNION
Document Signed by President Hutch-
insI 'Will Go to Governing.
Board Thursday
Fred J. Ptty,'21T, chairman of'the
committee in'"charge of the Studentl
council's petition for the use of Hill
auditorium for political speakers, last
night declared the committee favor-
ably impressed with the unofficial sup-
port accorded the action of the coun-
cil, and announced that President
Harry B. Hutchins had placed his sig-
nature to the petition.
Regents Meet Thursdy
The petition will be presented to
the Board of Regents at its ncxt meet-
ing, wlzich. will be held Thursday.
The council was unanimously in
favor of doing what 'it could in mak
ing it pssible for the student body
to assemble before those whos hav:
a message for them. "We are here
nominally getting a liberal education
while the most important die ussions
of the world's affairs are deied us,"
saidarl Johnson in support of the
project. "The politics of the country
is part of our education and we should
be provided with some place of as-
sembly upon the coming of the counn-
try's biggest men.'a
Union at Work
At the Union, where General Wood
was formally received, there is a
movement already under way to
bring the country's notaIes before.
the student body by inviting them to
be present at Union - dinners or at
any assemblies of studetts that might
be arranged for.
An entertainment committee that
will carry on this work is already
provided for and President. Carl Ho-
gan is in receipt of several letters
from men of note that are consents to
his invitations to the respective men.
He stated that the officers of the Union
felt the advisability of providing an
assembly hall. Our housecommIttee
will be glad to pass on the eligibility
of any prominent men that it is de-
sired to have address 'the sTudents."
'Part of Trainur "
"As part of our training as' citizens
we should hear political discussions'
and sinc 'the majority of the student
body is of voting age this kind of en-
lightenment is .indispensible," said
George Hurley, secretary. It was
stated that we *re old enough now
to interpret what We heard in a cn-
servative way ahd that radical talk-
ers would not- be permitted to pre-
sent themselves.
BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY ELECTS
12'TO ACTIVE MEMBERSHIP

during
at v
for ei

>nsideration of every
up appropriating
ement of the prohi-

Oontest Constitutionality
While the "wets" of the house were
aking their fight, Attorney-General
cCran of New Jersey filed suit in
ehalf of his state in the Supreme
ourt to ,declare the amendment un-
)Dstitutional and to prevent Feder-
1 officials from enforcing it.
The court fixed Monday for hear-
tg arguments in the original suit SIl-
I by Rhode Island and on the ap-
eals of Kentucky and Massachusetts
ecisions involving validity of the
nendment.
Not Drawn Properly
Attorney-General McCran contend-
I that the amendment was not prop-
'ly drawn and 'that congress pos-
essed no power to. propose a Con-.
itutional amendment, regulating the

abits and m

Appointmen
anding com
'ood league

orals of the people.
CHAIRMEN FOR
I LEAGUE APPOINTED
t of chairmen of the
mittees of the Leonard
have been made as fol-
tution,' Prof. E. C. God-
Law school; publicity,
lar, '20; membership,

_ELI

)enman Cruttendent, '20;
'rof. W. J. Hussey of the'
.epartment. Miss .Grace 6
ocial director of Martha Cc
tory, was erroneously annc
, member of the executive
ee in a prevoius issue of '1

"

With the formation of the Lowden-
for-President club students will have
a chance to become acquainted with
three presidential candidates, the
Wood-for-President club and Gamma
Ocicron Pi having already orgahized
with the idea of supporting their can-
didates for the presidency.
MANY POSITINS OPEN TO
ENGINEER GRADUATES

Will Initiate New' Men on April 6
Banquet Arrahged in
Honor
Phi Sigma, honorary biological si
ciety, made its spring elections I
membership last night. Members ar
elected for high scholastic standii
in biological subjects and for re
search work in biological fields.
Prof. E. C. Case was elected 'a
honorary .member of the society. Fac
ulty members elected were ~Mr. F. N
Gaige, Dr. G.' P. Grabfield, Prof. E
E. Nplson, and Prof. L. J. Young. Th
active members, chosen were: S. 'I
Becker, '21M, C. W. Creaser, '20,
C. Ludlum, '23M, H. M. Lumsdem, '2
L. H. McKim, '21M, B. B. Mcl nle
'22M, A--C. Starry, 'aOM, L. E. Web
meyer, '21.
Initiation will take place April
and will be followed by a banqu
in honor of the new members.
Cement Authority to Speak Tuesda
Mr.- A. N. Johnson, consulting en
gineer for the Portland Cement ass
ciation, has accepted the invitation
the highway department here tospea
on "Cements," before the students
the highway courses, at 9 o'cloc
Tuesday, March 9, in room 01 of th

be
this

HEWS

ANI

andi

"World Turmoil," is the subject an
expire nounced for a lecture to be delivere
to the meeting of Cosmopolitan cluba
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 202, Un
versity hall by Mr. John E. Hewso
y the British historian and publicist.
night, Mr. Hewson, now a resident of To
'esters, onto, Canada, is a graduate of the un
in the versity of that city, and is a frequer
m the, writer for British publications.
allowed general invitation is extended to th

ed Graduate 'engineers are having lit-
at tie trouble in obtaining positions ac-
i- coring to reports of the heads of de-
n, partments.
In the mechanical engineering de-
r- partment, calls are coming in daily
i- for college graduates who have exec-
nt utive ability. These positions deal
A with construction and operation of
he plants and factories. Salaries range
from $1,800 to $5,000.

CHIMES TRYOUTS

Sophomores wishing to try out
for the Chimes business staff
may apply at the Chimes office
in the Press building between
1 and 2 o'clock every day except'
Saturday. >

Announcement was made yesterday'
that flowers will not be worn at the-
sophomore Prom., This is in keep-
ing with the policy which prohiibts
their being worn at the J-Hop, ac-
,cording to Douglas Dow, '22E, chair-
man of the Prom'committee.
Five tickets still remain for the
Prom. These can be secured by
sophomores only from DaVid Beers
.by phone at 1460. The price is $5, in-
cluding war tax.

'I

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