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February 20, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1920.

PRICE THREF

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[LINES,
ITFORM
IVENTI ON
ENTRALIZATION
T OF EXE-
VE
ATION OF
FORE VOTE

i

TWENTY STUDENTS
RECEIVE ALL, A'S
More Names May Be Added to List
When Students Make Up Exams

Identlal Powers More
Than/Those of Any
ign in World

To date the list of students in the
literary college receiv~ig all A marks
comprises 20 names. Registrar Hall
states, however, that there may be a
few names added to the list due to
the fact that many of the marks have
been delayed and that some students
have not yet taken their examinations.
Of the present list eight are se-
niors, four are juniors, two'are sopho-
mores, and six are freshmen. The
list is as follows: ,
Fred W. Bartlett, '21, Lowell J.
Carr, '21, Marguerite Chapin, '20, Ro-
berta Deam, '20, Jane Dickinson, '20,
Frederic G. Donner,''23, Violet H. Fos-
ter, '22, Andrew C. Haigh, '20, Lucy
Huber, '23, George Husband, '23, Mar-'
garet Kraus, '23, EllneAr Mullett, '21,
Helen E. Mummery, '20, Charles Poor,
'20, Doreen Potter, '20, Edward Rams-
dell, '23, Edward S. Reid, '23, Irene
Sauble, '21, Harold Secott, '22, and
Ross G. Walker, '20.
BNONDANOES LITED~
BY PRESIDENT HUTCHINS

#'
C
M
I

FINAL ADRIA1TIC
VOTE PREPAREDi
Re-states American Position as Last
Word on Question, to Entente
Premiers
EXPECT MESSAGE WILL BE -
CABLED SATURDAY NIGHT
Washington, Feb. 19.- 'President
Wilson today prepared and sent to the
state department a reply to the , en-
tente premiers' note on the Adriatic
question. He was understood to have
re-stated the position of the American
government with a degree of finality.
Although the president dictated his
communication in less than two
hours, it. probably will not be put on
the cables before tomorrow night or
Saturday. An impression first went
out that it might be transmitted to-
night.

Dr. Burton Wants To Know Student
Body And ichigan Traditions

Pleased at Michigan's One Point Win
Over Minnesota; Interested in
Athletic Situation
(By Joseph A. Bernstein)
Dr. Marion Leroy Burton, president-
elect of the University of Michigan, is
visiting in Ann Arbor.
A Regents' meeting scheduled for
this morning, various social functions
last right, and a speech before the
Detroit Alumni association tomorrow,
night make up the program for the
new Michigan executive's visit to the
University, yet he had time to send a
message to the students of the Uni-
versity.
Interested in Students
"You know," he told reporters who
succeeded in gaining a few minutes
with him, "I want to get just as close
to the student body as I possibly can.
I want' to think I am one of the Uni-
versity like any student here, and I
want to know all about the student
affairs. They interest me."
GTERNENTCONTROL B
SOCIALISTS PREDICTED

Dr. Burton was at Martha Cook dor-
roitory at the time, visiting with his
daughter, Theodosia Burton, 122. He
did not keep the reporters waiting,
bud came into the reception room to
meet them. Descriptions -carried by
newspapers of the coming head of the
University of Michigan hardly do Yiim
justice. His personality is felt the
minnte he comes into sight, for the
strong smile that greets the person
who meets him can create only ad-
miration.
"You understand that I can say but
very little in my present situation,"
he said. "I know you are anxious to
get from me opinions on your affairs
here, but it is hard for me to give
them while I am still outside the Uni-
versity.
Studying History
"My job at the University of M-]
nesota allows me but little time to
learn as much as I would like to about
Michigan. In fact, I have been try-
ing to read the history of the Univer-
sity, but I have made but little prog-
ress because of the heavy work there.
I will get through it before the end of
the semester though," he said with de-1
termination.
Although it is but a littlething, it
was with surprise that- the reporters

UNIVERSITY H~
6REAT PROSPE1
400 lMEDICS THRONG UNIO
SEMBLY HALL TO HEA
HIS TALK
NEW PRESIDENT AV
STATEMENT OFPO
Great Student Body Necessary t
Great Executive, He D"ecl
to Hearers
"I believe above all in stat
versities, and I believe most of
the University of Michigan," sa
Marion L. Burton, president-el
the University, last night at th
medic smoker held in the ass
ball of the Union.
In his short address to the
of more than 500 medics, Dr. I
carefully avoided stating his vic
applied to the University and th
icy that he would adopt. "Thei
be ample opportunity for such
I come here in June," he said.
Enthusiastically Receivel
In company with President
B. Hutchins and the deans of t

New York, Feb. 19.-Elihu Root out-
.ed at the Republican state conven-
in here tonight the platform upon
itch he believes the party should go
the polls in Nevember. Most strik-.
g of his proposals were:
Decentralization of the executive
wers which have made the Presi-
nt' "more autocratic than any sev-
ign in the civilized world."
Approves Amendments
Ratification of the peace treaty with
iate amendments "long befdre the
,sidential elections."
Reform the league of nations coy-
ant by a congress of nations at the
1 of "a Republican President, im-
diately after March 4, 1921," to es-:
lish "the rule of public right rath-
than the rule of mere expediency."
ligid governmental economy and
adoption of an executive budget.
imitation of the right to strike at
>oint where it conflicts with self-
4ervation of the community; es-1
lishment of a labor tribunal with
e to enforce its mandates.1
evision of the system of taxation!
hich involves the tariff."
mericanization and the elimination
"a lot of Bolsheviki of Bolsheviki
apathizers" from public office.
niversity military training.
Fires Opening Gun
[r. Root's address, made at a con-
tion called to recommend four del-1
tes at large to the national con-
tion, was regarded as- the open-
gun of the campaign. It was
pared after informal conferences
h the most distinguished Repub-
ns of the state.

FIU

EPIDEMIC .ARL OVER,
HEALTH 'AUTHORITIES
SAT

With ni new cases of influenza re-
ported and no resulting deaths re-
corded, conditions have become so
favorable that President Harry B.
Hutchins today deemed it safe to is-
sue a notice stating that the ban on
University dances would be lifted be-
ginning Monday, Feb. 23. .

Adheres to Position
The president is understood to have
adhered to the position taken in his
note of Feb. 10, in which he informed
the Allies that if they were to proceed
in a settlement of the Adriatic ques-
tion without active participation of
the American government, a situation
might be created where the United
States might have to consider wheth-
er it could become a party to the
treaty of Versailles and the Franco-
American pact.
Meets Arguments
While conciliatory,. the premiers,'
reply to this original note was argu-
mentative. Mr. Wilson in. lis anr2wer
is understood to have met this argu-.
ment point by point and is believed
to have again called attention to the
principle of self-determination as
enunciated"in his 14 points and his
other declarations during the war
which were adopted by the central
powers as the basis of peace.
MISS WOOD TELLS
OF THERAPY WORK

SPECIAL EXECUTIVE ORDER
Having been advised by the
health authorities of the Univer-
sity that the danger i'rom the
influenza epidemic is praptic-
ally over, by special order I re-
move the ban on student dances,
this order to take effect Mon-
day noon, Feb. 23, 1920.
HARRY B. HUTCHINS,.
Feb. 19, 1920. 'President.

HILQUIT SAYS RADICALS WILL
COME INTO POWER
PEACEFULLY
Albany, N. Y., Feb. 19.-Morris Hil-
quit, Socialist leader, today predicted
that control of the United States gov-
ernment would pass peacefully into
the hands .of the Socialist party when
it enrolled the working class. He is-
sued a warning, bowever, that "it is
not impossible that the people of thisN
country will be compelled to supple-
ment their political action with a lit-
tle shogting, If' the profiteering class
revolts after the majority of the peo-)
ple are ready to endure "substantial
reforms" by "legal, constitutional
methods."
Testifying before the assembly ju-
diciary committee at the investigation
of the five suspended Socialists, as-
semblymen charged with disloyalty,
Mr. Hilquit stated that the Socialist
party intends to promote its program
by no other than "legislative action,
parliamentary action, and in a peace-
ful way..:
Mr. Hilquit made his "prophesy"
towards the close of his grilling cross-
examination by Martin Conboy, a com-
mittee counsel, who quoted Mr. Al
Berger as saying Socialists and work-
ers must be "prepared to back up
their ballots with their bullets."
REGISTRAR MAILED OUT ALL
LITERARY GRADES YESTERDAY

heard Dr. Burton use the word "Job"
in speaking of his office with the Uni-
versity-of Minnesota.'It characterizes,
however, the democracy of the man.
"It gave me pleasure the other
night when I read that your team beat
Minnesota by Just one point,"- he
laughed when he thought of it. "They
both seem to be pretty far down in
the Conference standing, but I was
really glad to see Michigan Win--
and by Just one point."
Dr. Burton is interested in the ath-
letic situation and was anxious to
learn of the eligibilty rules for var-
sity athletes. He, however, reserved
any cominent upon the present situ-
ation, pleading for an opportunity to
learn conditions thoroughly.
Magnetic Personality
Dr. Burton is as tall as reports have,
declared and is of the athletic type.
His grip is firm and when he clasps
one's hand and asks his name, one
feels thatdhe is really glad to meet
him. His biography, repeated before
in The Daily, is none too thorough,
for his personality is a ma netic one
and one that cannot be described in
mere words.
"I am going to make it a point to
learn this University from the in-
side," he said. "For a little while aft-
(Continued on Page Six)
SORETER PARTICIPATION,
IN SPORTS ADVOCATED

"More important than all," Mr. Root
aid, "is the necessity that we shall
store 'our Republican form of gov-
nment, with the liberty of the in-
vidual citizen preserved by lifnita-
ons upon official power, and put an
id to the dictatorship which we
eated, in order to carry on the war.
y a series of statues unprecedented
scope and liberality, with singleness
purpose and patriotic devotion
orthy of all praise, the American]
ople conferred upon the President
owers broader and more autocratic'
an were possessed by any sovereign'
the civilized world. Our capacity
r effort, our fortunes, our liberty
conduct, our lives, were freely plac-
at the disposal of 'an executive
hose authority was so vast that its
nits were imperceptible. The au-
ority was exercised by the Presi-
nt, by his heads of departments, his
ireau chiefs, his government agents,
(Continued on Page Six)
.

Dr. W. E. Forsythe of the University
Health service stated that -condltions
were practically normal and tht he
believed that the influenza epidemic
was at an end. *
Prompt and efficient care .on the
part of University and city health
authorities has prevented the disas-
trous spread' of the epidemic, and
though many people died of the dis-.
ease, a comparison with last year's
toll shows extremely gratifying re-
sults.
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city health of,-
ficer, reports that no new cases have
been reported in Ann Arbor for the
last three days, and no new cases are
reported in the hospitals.
AMBASSADOR SHARP, '81L, IS
HONORED BY OHIO ALUMNI

Miss Marcia F. Wood, instructor of
occupational therapy at Newberry
House in Detroit, addressed the vo-
cational conference held Thursday aft-
ernoon in Barbour gymnasium.
Miss Wood explained the meaning of
occupational therapy as curing
through occupation, and summed up
tote aims of the work" under three
heads , "Occupation of the sick during
convalescence, the curing of a disa-
bility through occupation, and the vo-
cational training and guidance of
those disabled by sickness or acci-
dent."
Miss Wood stated that almost every
hospital or institution now employs
one or more workers, so that women
taking the courses to be offered next
rummer at Newberry House in Detroit.
may be sure of securing positions.
"It is neither an' occupation for
nurses nor for doctors," said Miss
Wood, "but it is a new and highly
specialized social work."
CERCLE FRANCAIS
OFFERS $50 PRIZE

received at the smoker after the
quet given at the Union in his ]
by President Hutchins. After h:
troduction by the chairman of
evening, Prof. Hugh Cabot, Dr.
ton said, "It takes a great aud
to make a great speaker, and it
takes a great student body to
a great president." He stated th
is enthusiastic for the,'future o
University, and believes that "we
an opportunity in the years ahea
make a/great contribution to Ar
can civilization."
Dr. Burton strongly praised
work done by graduates of the i
cal school and urged each stude
dedicate himself to the field of
entific research.
Leaves for Smoker
Dr. Burton will leave Ann A
today to attend the smoker tonig
his honor at the Detroit Athletic
President Hutchins, the deans o
colleges, and the Regents will
attend this banquetsgivensbythe
troit alumni., Six students are g
to assist in the leading of the
i ng.
The other speakers at /the si
were: Prof. G. Carl Huber, Prof.
J. Wile, Dean Victor C. Vaughan,
Joseph A. Kervin, '20M, presiden
the senior medic class. An orche
and the Darling and Varsity ;
tettes provided' music, and the
mock clinics and a take-off on a
ulty meeting were presented by
medics.

nes Is Victin
/ext Gargoyle

ilcated to the proposition of
ing its youngest contemporary'
point of abasement where it will
up its shamed head with diffi-
the February Gargoyle will ap-
next week boldly branded as the

an, '20, head warden,
youth will not spare
Chimes from such
ery, such castigating
ave seldom seared the
us publication. Though
purpose is to show
'Crimes" in as near as
s-pf-a-feather light, it
d that the principal
those committed on the
whimsically satirical
the Boiler House"
he cover to beautifully
s of "A Michigan Man"
in Woman," irony, art,
.bine to make the com-
eal manufacturer of

William Graves Sharp, '81L, and
former ambassador to France, was
honored last night at the annual din-
ner of the ,University of Michigan
club of Cleveland by alumni from
Canton and nrthern Ohio.
Ambassador Sharp was conferred
with the honorary degree of L.L.D.
by the University in 1919. During
Commencement week last June he was
one of the speakers at 'a patriotic
exercise.
Before becoming ambassador to
France, Mr. Sharp served in congress
for several sessions. His home is at
Elyria, Ohio.
STUENTS FROM KALAMAZ00
COUNTY TO ORGANIZE CLUB
Organization of a University club is
being undertaken in Kalamazoo
'county by former college students.
All graduates and students of any
university who live in Kalamazoo
county are eligible for membership.-
Committee Will Fill Vacancies
The Union appointment committee
will meet at 9 o'clock Saturday
morning to nominate men for com-
mittee positions, left vacant by inelig-
ibility incurred this last semester. A
number of places will have to be fill-

A prize essay contest to end April
5, has been announced by the Cercle
Francais. A $50 prize will be award-
ed the winner..
The contest is open to all under-
graduates who have not had excep-
tional advantage by birth or residence,
and is intended as an opportunity for
students to apply their knowledge ot
French. The subjects for the essays
are announced by the department and
are ten in number. All essays should
be sent to the department of romance
languages by April 5.
RESERVE AVIATORS MEET TO'
FORM ORGANIZATION THURSDAY
Captain Lucas of the R. 0. T. C.
spoke to the reserve military avia-
tors Thursday night on the advisa-
bility of forming an organization to
keep up interest in aviation and .to
keep them in touch with the govern-
ment's plans for their further train-
ing.
Lieut. O. J. Hall, '23E, was elected
chairman and Lieut. E. F. Boxell, '21,
secretary as temporary officers to
carry out plans for the formation of
a permanent organization. The avia-
tors discussed with interest the possi-;
bility of Michigan entering a plane in
the coming intercollegiate Aerial
Derby.

Some Reports Incomplete Due to
Marks Received Late; Students
Should See Instructor
All literary college grade cards
were mailed yesterday. Some were
necessarily incomplete, but a number,
of grades were received by the reg-
istrar's office after the cards were
sent out. Such grades should be se-
cured directly from instructors.
VARSITY GLEE .AND MANDOLIN
CLUB READFOR DEPARTURE
The Varsity Glee and Mandolin
club leaves at 11:10 this morning for
Port Huron on a special car, for their
annual trip. The club held their final
practice last evening in Lane hall,
under the direction of Mr. Russell
Carter and Frank Taber, who direct.
the two parts in the club, respective-
ly. Sixty members will take the trip..
Before the concert in Port Huron
the members of the club will be en-
tertained at a dinner and afterward
at a formal dance in the Masonic
Temple. Saturday noon the club will
be given a final luncheon at the Al-
gonquin arbor.
RICKY MOUNTAIN CLUB PLANS
TO GIVE BANQUET AND DANCES

McANDREW SAYS IT WOULD BET.
TER-ATHLETIC CONDI-
TIONS
That athletic conditions at Michigan
would be more promising were there
a greater participation in health-
full sport by students, was the de-
claration of William McAndrew, asso-
ciate superintendent of schools -in
New York City, who spoke to the Un-
iversity of Michigan club in Detroit:
Wednesday.:,
Wants More Athletics
"The salvation of athletics at the
University of Michigan as elsewheri,
is more athletics," said Mr. McAn-
drew. "By this I 'mean the greater
participation of the full membership
of the University in healthful sport.
I never regretted anything so much
as the fact that I was given no ath-
letic training at Michigan when I was
there 30 odd years ago."
Referring to the teaching profession
Mr. McAndrew stated that because of
the low opinion of the profession held
by the community, our school sys-
tems are facing a serious crisis.
Should Consult Teachers
"On great public question's," he
said, "the opinions of lawyers, doct-
ors, and business men weres freely
consulted, but no teachers were ever
called into consultation, despite the
fact that they are supposed to be, pri-
marily, men and women of brains.
"This is due,.largely, to the fact that'
a living wage, is no longer paid to
the men and women engaged in the
profession,' and in this country, at
least, the whole subject of education
has reached a serious crisis," he con-
cluded.

Crane Advocates
Nelv Amendmen
Prof. Robert T. Crane of the pol
ical science department yesterd
termed as "very desirable" the propo
ed constitutional amendment requi
ing the determination of the supren
court of a president's fitness to di
caurge his .duties in case of illnes
Two bills have already been intr
duced in the house with this inte
in view.
"There is unquestionably a nece
sity for some sort of action in rega
to a president's incapacity to act di
to illness," Professor Crane said. "U
fortunately, the constitution does n
say anything about such an emerge
cy. A constitutional amendment pr
viding for a 'definite arrangement
such a case would be desirable. I .b
lieve. however, that a federal statu
might accomplish the same purpo
as an amendment.
Changes In Class.
Studentq wishing to take the cours
in Rostand, French 28, will meet
4 o'clock this afternoon in room 20
south wing. The course will be give
on the condition that a sufficient num
'er of students apply.

The Rocky Mountain club met
Thursday evening at Lane hall. Plans
were discussed for two dances 'nd a
banquet to take place within the next
three months,. the first dance to be'
held the week end following March 1
in the Arcade hall. The next meet-
ing of the club will be Wednesday,
March 1.

Date Set for
The annual
Schoolmasters'
Ann Arbor on
April 1 and, 2.

Schoolmasters'
conference t
club will be 1

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