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February 19, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-19

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43

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY- 19, 1920.

t r

Ionflicting Date
Of Prom Changed
lb prevent conflict with the J-Hop
I the later dances of the engineer-
and literary colleges, the date of
*oph Prom has been set tentative-
for Friday, March 19. The deci-
a to submit this date for approval
s reached at a meeting of the Soph
>m committee. held yesterday after-

NEW DATE FOR LIT CHANGES
Because of delays due to late
reports, the time for making. un-
avoidable changes in elections in
the literary college is postponed
until Wednesday and Thursday,
Feb. 25 and 26.
ARTHUR G. HALL, Registrar.
*

UNIVERSITY SENDS ENGRAVED MEMORIAL
TO RELATIVES OF MICHIGAN MARTYRS

SAY Same Plans to Be Used
CTORY Due to the fact that all matters
incident to the Prom must be sub-
bilized for mitted for apprgval kefore being pub-
Leyel lished, definite announcement concet'n-
ing the Prom plans are unobtainable.
However, it is understood that much
.s)the same arrangements (will be com-
arantee pleted for the affair as had been de-
Guaanefoe cided upon for the previously sched-'
uled Prom of April 9.
The Union will probably be the lo-
cation secured, and "Sandy" Wilson's
d today to 10 piece orchestra will be engaged.
Mch ae toSpecial entertainment as well as un-
oich are to usual decorations and programs will
n of thefd be the order, according to Chairman
emeuares Douglas Dow, '22E. It is Dow's plan
ie measure to re-establish the Soph Prom on the
and fares old footing which It' formerly had,
ommission that of being to the second year men
what the J-Hop is to the juniors.
e return of Tickets on Sale Next Week
lly against Tickets will go on sale next week,
n not ap- will be non-transferable, and will be
Commerce sold to sophomores only. -
ation rAeas-A U
advances EIE I N T E

Two Hundred Twenty-five Messages
of Condolence Mailed
Memorials to fathers and mothers,
wives or next of kin, to the Univer-
sity of Michigan students and alumni
who lost their lives in the European
war are being' sent out by the Uni-
versity. Efforts are being made to
make the list as accurate as possible
and the committee announces that in
so far as they possibly can a memo-
rial will be sent to .the relatives of
every man connected with the Univer-
sity who wore the military or naval,
uniform of his country. To date some
225 memorials have been mailed...
The memorials are beautifully en-
graved with the name of the soldier
or sailor dead, and of his next to kiI
tettered in old English type. The me-
morial reads:

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
In Memory of
To-(Names of parents or next, of
kin).
The Regents of the University of
Michigan take this means of convey-
ing to you their profound sympathy in
the loss of one who was near to you.
A loss of life like this is irreparable,
but it may console you in some manner
to know that the University shares in
your sorrow, and that it adds this
name to the roll of those who in the
Great War gave their lives to the
country. It is by such splendid ex-
amples of, loyalty and self sacrifice
that the fine tradition of the Univer-
sity is strengthened and perpetu
ated."
The memorial is signed, "Harry B.

HOMER B. HUIB
CHOSEN TO SF
AT UNIOIN SERI
KOREA SCENE OF EDU
WORK IN FAR EAST
NATIVES
REISS, '20, APPOINT
COMMITTEE MI
Speaker Known for Ability
turer on Chautauqua C
Overseas, Too

Dinner to be Given in Honor of
Head; to Meet Deans and-
Officials

New

as, in the
the con-
ng to the
d to stab-
)ad. indus-
s deemed

as.
nploy-
n the
inter-
nd to
onfer-

Few New Cases Reported% Come from
Outside Points, Say Doetors
Encouraging reports of the flu sit-
uation were received yesterday from
oth the University and the city health,
service. Dr. 3, A. Wessinger, city
health offilcer, reported four new cas-
es, while Dr. W. E. Forsyth stated that
only three new eases had been discov-
ered among students,
Both doctors said that they believ-
ed the epidemic was practically over
and that conditions in Ann Arbor
were greatly improved. Dr. Forsyth
expressed the belief that the new cases
contracted were brought from De-
troit.
The records. compiled in the city

ng that
ot pre,
$5ept. :I
sed sat-
against
he next

r'

WILL COME TO ANN ARBOR
TO ATTEND REGENTS' MEET,
Dr. Marion L. Burton, President-
elect of the Uniyersity, will arrive in
Ann Arbor dn the Wolverine from Chi-
cago at 2:45 o'clock this afternoon
when President Harry B. Hutchins
will meet him.
During the afternoon Dr. Burton
will spend his time going over mat-
ters of business. At 6:30 o'clock to-
night he will be tthe guest of Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins at a dinner
in his honor to, be held at the Union.
At this dinner the deans of the col-
leges and the administrative officers
of the University will be present.
Friday Dr. Burton will' attend the
Regents' meeting, until 2:45 o'clock,
'when he leaves for Detroit to attend
a banquet honoring hii, to be given
by the Detroit Athletic club and. the
University club.
He will return to Ann Arbor on Sat-
urday, when he will look after person-
al 'matters regarding big~ residence.
He will probably leave the city some
time Saturday. During his stay Dr.
,Burton will be a guest at Martha Cook
dormitory, wbere Mrs. Burton is stay-
ing.
CARVER HEARD BY
COMMERCE CLUB
Prof. Harry C. Carver spoke to the
members of the Commerce club last
night in room 306 of the Union on the
subject of "Insurance Against the
Workman's Conmpensation Laws, for
Corporations," He explained the sys-
tem of machine acounting employed
in collecting statistics by large insur-
ance companies, as well as , in the
tabulation of the national census.
He also described the method of
computing premiums for various in-
dustrLes, and the advantages which a
company derives from taking out a
policy covering its entire payroll. That
the service given by an insurance'
company to a number of industries
materially decreases the number of
injuries and deaths through accident,
was shown by the speaker.
This was the first of a'series of talks
'to be given before the Commerce club
by" men who are intimately' connected
with the business world.
GRADES DELAYED; ADDRESSES*
HELD TO BE RESPONSIBLE
Many of t e literary college grades
for the last semester were mailed yes-
terday, others will be sent out today,
and all those .that are complete will
be Despatched by tomorrow.
flundreds of cards will be delayed
because of the fagt that the home ad-
dress, was given 'Instead of the Ann
Arlhr address, as the directions on the
curd demanded.

COLLECTION BFCDUS IL

MEMBERS- Of FACULTY
BEHIND "Y" CAMPAIGN.

PLAN T O INCLUDE CLASS TAX
REGISTRATION FEE
SUGGESTED

IN PROFESSORS SCHEDULEU TO AD-
DRESS STUDENT ORGAN-
IZATIONS

F'

health ofmoe shoW this year's cases,
while being greater in number than
last year, to be much less serious. The
number of cases reported this year
was 714 against 624 last year, but of
this number only 64 developed into
pnuemonia as compared with 256 last
[year. The number .pf deaths was also,
far lower than in 1919, when 117 died
of the disease. So far this year there

Ws lquji4to
olf

Hutchins, president.
Smith, secretary."

Shirley

W.

Speaking
ties in the
Hulbert of
deliver the

on America's
far east, Prof. I
Springfield, M
principal addre

have been 40 deaths.
ELKIND, '19,.PLANS ;EXTENSION
WORK OF COSMOPOLITAN CLUB

Discussion concerning the proposed
system for the collection of class
dues terminated last night at the
meeting of the Student council in the
appointment of a committee to further
investigate the matter and render a
report at the next meeting. "The com-
mittee consists of G. D. Anderson, '20,
L. R.2,Birth, 20D, and LeGrand E.
Gaines, '21E.
Under the suggested_ system the
class dues will be included in the reg-
istration fee at the beginning of each
semester and will be held in trust by
'the treasurer of the University for the
classes. In this manner the class
treasurers will be relieved of all the
difficulty usually encountered in col-
lecting the dues and will be able to
draw money under a voucher system.
Matter Not New
Considerable attention was paid to
this new plan by the council last
spring but the matter was dropped and
. -eappearance of late has caused it
to te considered more seriously.
The opinion of the council was de-
cidedly in favor of this plan and the
members also approved that the ac-
cumulated funds should eventually be
used for the establishment of scholar-
ships.
Dates to Be Set
Plans for the semester were dis-
cussed and a committee was appoint-
ed to set dates for Cap night, the
Spring games, Swing-out, and the All-
campus election. Grayson W. Gill,
'20A, was sworn in as a council mem-
ber and F.' J. Petty, '20, was elected
recording secretary.
MONARCHY TO DEMOCRACY IN
INDUSTRY, HOLMES' SUBJECT
Unitarian Pastor Believes F'ormation
of Third Party Will End
Unrest of Masses
Dr. John Haynes Holmes, pastor of
the Unitarian Community church of+
New York City, and editor of the
"World of Tomorrow," spoke before
the Intercollegiate Socialist society7
last night in Natural Science auditor-
ium. "From Monarchy to Democracy
in Industry" was his subject.
"The economic world should' follow
the road of the political world and
throw off the rule 'of the benevolent+
despots," said' Dr. Holmes. "An indus-
trial Magna Charta has been given the
workers in England and a similar so-
lution must come here. The formingi
of a third party and the putting ofI
that party in power by the workers
would prevent unthinking action byw
the masses." .
After the lecture an open discus-I
sion was held, the speaker answering
questions from 'his audience.
AEROPLANES N FORESTRY
TOPIC OF ANDREWS' TALK
"Aeroplanes in Forestry" was thet
subject of a talk given by Mr. H. J.
Andrews of the forestry departmentI
before the Forestry club last night.
Preceding th talk a short businessI
meeting was held. A committee re-I
ported on the preliminary arrange-I
ments\ which have been made for aI
Forestry club dance to be given prob-4
ably on Friday, March 1i.

Members of the faculty of the Uni-
versity are co-operating with the Y.
M. C. A. in.its campaign this week for
religious education and financial sup-
port from every man on the campus.
Several of the leading professors
have bee} secured by the "Y" to ad-
dress the various student organiza-
tions on the purposes of the move-
ment, among whom are Prof. W. C.
Hoad of the engineering~ college, Dr.
C. Carl Huber, and Prof. Louis C.
Karpinski, of the mathematics depart-
ment. ,
"Y" Starts New Policy
J. Erwin Goodwillie, '20E, execu-
tive chairman of the campaign, said in
reference to the movement: "The
'Y' is beginning the policy of serving
as a unifying force in the religious
life of the campus, rather than as an
independent agency, as in the past.
Funds to the extent of $5,000 are to be
raised by a general canvass of the
University students and those mem-
bers of the faculties who did not con-
tribute to the Ann Arbor community
budget.. The amount requested of the
students is small in comparison to the
funds required by other universities.
Cornell alone is out after $10,000."
Employment Bureau Busy
According to a recently issued re-
port on the activities of the Univer-
sity "Y", its employment bureau has
given jobs to 1,387 students since Sep-
tember. The bulletin states that one
of the chief policies of the "Y" is to
promote sectional clubs as a means
of bfinging Michigan in closer touch
with otherparts of the country.
Changes In Courses
Prof. M. P. Tilley will meet his
class in English 4a (Shakespeare) at
.6.
11 o'clock Tuesdays and Thursdays in
room 20 Mason hall, instead of in
room 206 Tappan hall, as previously
announced.
Economics 38
There will be no lecture In this
course on Friday of this week. Quiz
sections have been arranged and a
new list of sections and hours was
posted Wednesday evening. The Tues-
day and Thursday sections will meet
today. Those who have not been as-
signed to sections should attend the
section they prefer today.
rQMERENE WITHDRAWS FROM
CONTEST FOR NOMINATION
Washington, Feb. 18.-Senator Pom-
erene, Democrat, of Ohio, withdrew
tonight from the contest for the Dem-
ocratic presidential nomination. Nec-
essity of devoting his entire attention
to important legislation in the senate
and the fact that under the Ohio state
primary law a solid delegation would
be impossible, which he said virtually
been linnig up for blocks to gain ad-
Francisco convention, were given by
-the Ohio senator as his reasons for
dhonnin out of th race.,

third University Union service
heldt at 6:15 o'clock Su nda,
In Hill auditorium.
Professor Hulbert is an authe
questions of the far east, hay
voted 23 years to carrying on
tional work in the orient. M
his time has peen spent in
Where he was sent by . the
States government to establish
ucational system. He was a"
of the recent massacres of Cl
Koreans by Japanese soldiers
the riots following the announ
of the independence movement
Has Repute as Leeturer
In addition to being an ed
Professor Hulbert is also a b
of wide experience. He was
years a lecturer on the Chat
circuit and later addressed the
ican expeditionary forces in
under'the auspices of the Y. M
His object In speaking in ths
try at present is to enlist the
the Americans in the Korean
ment.
The rhmainderiof the servi
be conducted by Dr. F. P..
pastor of the Disciples churc
will pronounce the Benedictio
Louis Eich, of the Oray
ment, who will read from the
ture.
These services were arranged
University service committee c
ed of 11 reipresentative men ani
en 'engaged in various activit
the University..
Reiss Appointed to Commit
Walter Reiss, '20, business m
of The Chimes, was appointed
committee;-of which . L. Rour
is the chairman, at Ate last mi
PROF., J. BURSLEN
RESUMES DU'
Former Lieutenant Colonel Ta
Old Office
Lieut.-Col. Jospeh, E. Burs
returned to resume his duties
fessor in mechanical engineeri
er an absence of more than two
Colonel Bursley has, since th
of the war, been in charge of'th
age department of the Detroit d
During the war Professor Bursl
ervised the expenditure of or
appropriations, which for this
alone- amounted to more than
30 million dollars. These app
tions were made by the gove:
to enable various essential Ind
to increase their capacity. an
put.
At' the end of the war this
ment, and machinery was sold,
was this work of sa'lvage in
Colonel Bursley was engag
present he is here on leave of a'
PROFITEERING LEAST CA)
OF LIVING EXPENSE-
New York, Feb. 18., - Profi
is the last and least 'of six r
for the high., cost of living gi
an address today by Howard E
an assistant United States a
general.
"The first reason for preser
ditions," said the speaker, "is
creased volume of 'money and
second, 'Ithe wide increase in
due partly to war necessity atn
ernment wage scales; third, le
rural production; fourth, in
cost of distribution; fifth, recki
travagance and a .spirit of spe'

college Work in the extension of the Cos-
to send mopolitan clubs in the orient is plan-
the asned by A. E. Elkind, '19, president of
oclafiohethe Michigan club, at the completion
its kind of his graduate work -here in June.
This decision was reached after a con-
resented sultation' with Dr. George Nasmyth,
erica by the international delegate who stopped
e an ox- in Ann Arbor for a short time early'
atevidio, in February on his way to Chicagos
from. Canada.

students in
re this year,
Larchi, i
Lment of any
ry of the c

Detroit Auto S§how Wan Prog
Detroit, Feb. J$.-o great is tbe.
popularity R 4.ih 19,20 A tpgo ila
show now in session ix thg o WqrOi
salos building t at aito fans hove
been lining i pr block tp gi a -
mission when the ggos open dgity

DSF CONSTITWTIONAL AMENDMENT
OR CA1UE 01 PRESIDENTIAL ILLNESS

:te4 ($y Associgted Presa)
44t' Waslitg4, Feb. A - President
Fi' Wilson's extende dillnss and the at-
tendant dise#s4 as to whether he'
waa incapacitated f4 'entinuing his
' duties gave ige today to two propos-
als in the house to clarity and supple-
ment in constitutional provisions on
the subject.
It was made clear, however, that
neither proposal was aimed at Presi-
-dent .Wilson, the intent being to. de-
Oeff the procedure for future emerg-
ency, beyond any possiblity of mis-
conception or partisan action.

The lirat proposal was in the form
'of a resolution for a constitutional
amendment, introduced by Represent-
ative Fss, of Ohio, chairman of the
Republican, congressional committee,
proposing to have the supreme court
determine the ability of a president to
discharge his duties, whenever author-
ized by. a condurrent resolution of
congress.
Virtually the same procedure was
outlined in a bill introduced by Rep-
resentative Rogers, Republican of
Massachusetts, and referred to the
judiciary committee along with the
Fess resolution,

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