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January 30, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_

Students Come and Go but the'
Chimes are in Their 37th Year

Dress Foot- Wear

4

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The chiming of the campus bells
has become such a familiar sound
that it is scarcely noticed. Yet every
day for. the past 37 years these bells
have been ringnig the hours, half
hours, and quarter hours and a glance
into their history reveals much that
is curious and interesting of the early
life and customs of the University.
First Record of Bells in 1844
In tracing the story of the bells,
Byron Finney, '71, reference librarian
emeritus, has found no definite record
of their use until 1844, although; "The
custom of calling students to school
and to chapel by the ringing of a bell
is so ancient and universal that we
,may presume it to have been observ-
ed when the University opened its
doors in Ann Arbor on Sept. 24,
1841," at which time seven students
applied for admission and were given
rooms in the building now called Ma-
,son hall, at a charge of $2.50 per stu-
dent for three months.
The first record of the use of a bell
is" in the report of the Board of Re-
gents in 1844 when it was decreed
that "ringing the bell" should be in-
cluded among the duties of the jani-
tor.

0

Numerous social functions of the near future
ill require 1'ootwear apparel which is in keep-
g with the occasion.
THE ABOVE PUMP STYLE WE HAVE NOW IN
Dull French Kid Gold and Silver Cloth
French Pat Colt White Washable Kid
Black and White Satin

students to classes, he was later ap-
pointed assistant librarian. But the
added duties were apparently too
strenuous for him and Kelly was re-
placed by a new janitor.
The first bell used was borrowed
from the Michigan Central railroad,
which was at that time a state road.
It was suspended on some rails from
a third story window in North hall.
.When, during President Tappan's ad-
ministration, the dormitories were
abandoned and the students given
rooms in private houses, the bell was
taken down and placed on a post in
"the rear of the building.
Used in Pranks
As might be supposed, the gong
furnished material for many student
pranks. It was frequently moved
from its third story window to some
other where the janitor experienced
considerable difficulty in finding it in
the early morning. When it .was
placed on the post it took several
midnight trips in the hands of stu-
dents and, one December night it was
turned upside down and filled with
water. In the morning the water was
not only frozen but the bell was
slightly cracked by the expansion of
the ice and henceforth gave out dis-
cordant sounds.
This bell was soon found to be in-
adequate but, although the. purchase
of a new one was frequently discuss-

ed, no action was taken until 1870 purchase of a clock. The purchasE
when it was decided to secure a new was granted and the clock was set u1
bell by turning in the old one and early in January, 1886. Although
spaying the difference. there was some talk of operating the
Purchase Pei in 1883 clock by electricity, it was finally de
cided to use weights and the clock
After installation the new bell, has* been operated by this method
which had a much louder tone than ever since.
its predecessor, was used continually When 'the old library was demolish-
until the purchase of the Westmins- ed in 1917 the clock and bells were
ter Peal in 1883. This peal was a removed and, in the summer of that
gift of Andrew D. White, then presi- year, placed in the tower of the engi
'dent of Cornell University, and pre- placedhin.thetoer ofathni-
4viously professor of history at the teetie sop he ne lton ad
to the low height of the tower and
Unilversity of Michigan. the number of surrounding buildings
Prof. Charles Kendall Adams, at somewhat marred the tone which was
that time head of the history depart- accorded to compare favorably wit?
n and later president of Cornell the best peals in the country.
university and the University of Wis-MWinding Requires2 Men
consin, spent some time together withg r
Robbins Battell of New York in the a In the engineering tower the bells
selection of a suitable group of bells. were rehung and the clock placed it
After an extended investigation and a protected room below. The pendu-
correspondence both in this country lum is pearly 14 feet in length and
and Europe, the order for a peal of weighs about 250 pounds. Its opera-
four bells weighing from 270 to 3071 tion is carried on by a system 01
pounds was given to the Clinton H. weights suspended in the four cor-
Meneely bell company of Troy, N. Y. ners of the tower. Cables connected
At completion a final inspection was ,to the clock cause the bells to ring
given them by Prof. C. B. Cady of the by operating iron hammers which1
School of Music, who pronounced the strike the outside of the lower rim
,chimes to be "more nearly in tune It requires two janitors two hourE
ithan any of the chimes we visited." each week to wind the clotk.
The chimes were accordingly brought In closing his account of the
,to Ann Arbor and set up in the weS chimes, Mr. Finney said: "The good
tower of the library building which old peal has served the University
had been completed that year. well for one generation, and it is to
be hoped that it may continue for
Clock Secured in 1886 many more, by its inspiring tones, as
Professor Adams, through whose ef- is so well expressed in the inscrip-
forts the chimes had been obtained, tion on the large bell, to call together
placed before the Board of Regents those who are studious of all good
several propositions concerning the things both human and divine."

AT
THEF

? iaRE ..~,.

BOOT,
SIIOI

115 So. Main St

Janitor's Posiion Important
The position of Patrick Kelly, the
first janitor, seems to have been one
of importance for, besides being vest-
ed with the duty of summoning the

a

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111111 i ilil llii111111'1ifi l 1111111111 11l~fltlli t11i iiiiii
IA Reduction of 20
On All Odd Sul
Wadhans &
.Plain Street St
111HHi i1111111ii 11i 1l IIIIIIIInit Ii i 11III II~fill

Per
Cen4t

its

Co.

ate Steet

For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
YOU WILL ENJOY USING THE
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.

now-,

- ASK US-

''

5/

F ARMERSf & MECHANICS BANK

101-105 SOUTH MAIN STREET

330 SOUTH STATE STREET
(Nickels Arcade)

a
y II' M W U M I

i

__ _1

THE

ml %W.".d

LOVE? FAME?? RICHES??? -.WHICH WOULD YOU CHOOSE?
Brooke Decided She Would Have All -- Never Dreaming of the Countless Difficulties and Temptations that Lay
LETS GO! TODAY AND TOMORROW

Before Her.

ARCADE
CAFETERIA

.iso Mr. and Mrs. Carter DeHaven in "CLOSE TO NATURE"

Nickels Arcade

'AI

Up the Stairs

71

Hey Boy! Have You Tasted The Good

I

Food At The ARCADE?

SUNDAY - MONDAY - TUESDAY

NORMA TALMADGE
- IN -
"She Loves and She Lies"
ADULTS 35a, CHILDREN lOc

Pure foods at low prices, prepared by experts.
Everything displayed on our forty-foot steam and
serving talges.
Select just what appeals to your own individual
appetite.
Bakery goods fresh from our own ovens.
Delicious coffee with rich Jersey cream.
Kindness, courtesy, and good service prevail here.

I

A~ TALN
LO YES A

SPECIAL MUSIC

SPECIAL MUSIC

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