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January 17, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-17

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st Times Today

I

VIVIAN MARTIN
ind s
"5The Third Kiss"

I

ARCADE
Shows at300 oo; 8:30
Phones:
Theatre. 206--R M t'e Res.. 23r6- I
LAST TIMES TODAY
VIOLA DANA
in
"The Willow Tree"

Communications
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
I strongly pratest the action of the
Michigan Union authorities in having
uniiormed "servants" at the entrance
of and within the club house.
n occasional visitor in n A.r-.
bor, it was my pleasure to be a din-
ner guest at the Union Last Sunday.
And while I warmly admire this splen-
did building and the service which It
renders, I was disgusted at the sight
of these "servants in livery," students
disguised as flunkies.
Shades of Prexy Angell! Is Mich-
igan really to prove herself guilty of
the chIrge of having become the
most aristocratic of state universities?
I am a Michigan man, through and
through. Michigan has conferred
three degrees upon me; and eight
years of my life have been spent in
the University as a student or as a
member of its faculty. I am a contr4.
buting life member of the Union. As

ed atmosphere of student democracy'
-whatever that way mean.
However useful the Union may have
-become, I contend that the placing
of unifarmed flunkies at its doors is
rankly undemocratic. It is a provinc-
ial exhibition of aristocratic non-
sensa-It is 'a crude effort to ape the
1 etropolitan clubs and hotels with
their solemn and imposing Ethiopian
door-keepers In their gilded rainment,
And while city clubs and hotels may
have a conventional. right to these
human ornaments, sucha procedure
in a great university that frankly pro-
fesses devotion to democratic ideals,.
is indefensible.-
In the name of 40,000 alumni, most
of whom still believe in the splendid
democratic traditions of the Universi-
ty of Michigan, I condemn this arrant
foolishness.
GLENN D. BRADLEY,
107 Lit, Ph.D., 1915.

are uniformed It is a fact that any e eree
person who has had any experience -
in the management of olub houses of THE MAJESTr
the size of the Union will corroborate,
that uniformed attendants in those The idintiy of 'MiA4" t1
parts of the building frequented by heroine of "Tho Third ti ," V
iembers ark always more efficient 5est Paramoimt-Artcraft p
in performing their duties because starring Viviain Martin whieh -
they know that everybody under- presented again today at'theA M
stands why they- ire place, where piques the curiosity of the av
they .are, they. realize as- clearly as froi ithe first tih t$ alpaI
do the members that they are there reveal it Would 'g1v :aWay the
for a - purpose. So much-for the -this play which'is themost in

I

of Du-

gs

111111111111.11 .

Lauder
doirc of

hL nCh
Sodas
oandie
SUGAR B(
109 S. MAIN

a sophomore I atended the first ban-
quet held for the promotion of the
S Union. That was in Waterman gym,
M back in 1904 when "Bob" Parker was
2 boosting the Michigan Union idea. We
sI = then believed that the Union was to
become a great and thoroughly dem-
)WL ocratic institution, the one and only
center for Michigan men in Ann Ar-
ST. E bor. Always it was to be democratic.
= The Union was born, cradled, and for
lilSP{Ii!l10tll "15 years it has developed in a profess-

jI

FJ

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
I wonder if it occurred to Mr.
Bradley as he wrote his communica-{
tion relative to the "servants in liv-
ery" at the Union, that it might possi-
bly be that they are needed. If they'
were merely ornaments, the presump-
tion on which he based his letter,
then he would be quite right in what
he says. and since the ofiictals of the
Union have the same desire as Mr.
Bradley "to keep the Union true to
its democratic ideals, those same'
"flunkeys" would never have been
put there in the first place.
Permit me to point out briefly why
these men are where they are, and
also why they are in uniform.
1. The attendants in the "front"
of the house are in uniform for the
reason that they look better so at-
tired. It would be rather inconsist-
ent for the Union to have a perfectly
designed and appointed building, and
at the same time have the employees
who are placed in it where they can
be of service to the members, attired
in the rainment which they wear when
they come to the manager's office
looking for a sob. I cannot bring*
myself to believe that uniformity and
neatness are merely evidences of
"aristocracy." To me they denote
an inward orderliness that assures
better management, and a consequeqt-
ly increased enjoyment by the mem-
bers of their building.

'psychology of the uniform,
2. It is impossible. to make the
Union function as a "democratic" or-
ganization without paid attendants
If there were no doormen, the Union
building, built by.18,000 alumni "for
Michigan Men Everywhere," would be
a mecca for landladies and their
retinues, for dogs and laughing, shout-
ing children, and for the scintillating
recitations of the famed Dr. Tom Lov-
ell, and by a natural process of elim-
ination the members of the Union
would get in occasionally to enjoy the
building in the proper manner. I am
afraid that even the members of the
'Union who believe in the democratic
ideals of the Union would rather that
we never go that far in. expressing
our ideals.
In the last analysis, democracy or
no dem cracy, the Union belongs to
Its men thers only. The Union ex-
presses its democracy in its relations
to its members and its rules concern-
ing eligibility :to tnembershipj All
are alike, all have equal \rights, priv-
ileges and duties. These uniformed
attendants are hired and dressed in
order to make the stay of members in
the building more pleasant. Uniform'
or no uniform, to my way of think-
ing, that is the essence of democracy,
and Mr. Editor, I like my democracy
with a frill or two for the same rea-
son that I enjoy dessert. It tops off
the meal. But "de gustibus non dis-
putanum est," and I think that Mr.
Bradley and myself will at least 'agree
on that age old fact.
GEORGE .F. iURLEY, '18L.
General Secretary.
Have you arranged with the Sped-
ding Studio for your Michiganensian
sitting? Sittings must be made be-
fore Feb. 1.-Adv. .

v
ryl

In chch Miss Martin has been featu
ed. Harrison Ford is the.leading ma
TE ARCADE
Important as art isx Eugene O'Brie
'appearing as an aspiring young pain
er in "The Broken Melody" today at
tomorrow at the Arcade, decides wi
Hedda Dana, a girl studying to be
,prima donna, that it is not the on
thing in life. Ambition is the cau
of the estrangement, that comes b
tween the two artists but after mai
adventures and much self-reproac
they are reunited.
'22 LITS WILL HOLD SMOKER
TUESDAY EVENING IN UNTO

The soph lits are planning to l
a smoker at 7:30 Tuesday ever
in' the reading room on the sec
floor of the Union.
Efforts are being made to get C
Eddie Rickenbacker here -to add
the smoker. In addition, Dean J
R. Eflinger, Prof. John R. Brumm,
Robert A. Campbell, treasurer of
University, and George Hurley,
eral secretary of the Union will sp
For music there will be a 12 p
'orchestra and a male quartette,
Tickets may be obtained at el
the Michigan Union or Graham's be
store.
Join Laschen's Dancing school I
at Packard. Beginners, 7-9.
dance, 9-12. Big prize waltz this V
at 10:30; everyone eligible. C
and learn to dance correctly; c
single if you like. 0. D. Lash
Detroit.-Adv.
MARTHA WASHINGTON CANI
at Tices' Drug Store, 117 S. Main
Fresh every Friday.-Adv.,

r

TODAY-FOR THE LAST TIME

V I O ILA DA NA
Star of "Please Get Married"

i

- --- in-
E W I L. L OW T RE E"
From the popular stage production by Cohan and Harris
the image, carved from the heart of the willow tree, that love calls to life in the
maiden is a rare fantasy-and it is exquisitely told.

TODAY

LAST TIMES

a

Dainty.VIVIAN

in "THE THIRD KISS"

"She rebelled against the first and second kisses
he gave her, in fact she protested with the feroc-
ity of a warrior. But after the third-well, see
'The Third Kiss'-it ,was different and so is the
picture."

"What was so peouliar about this third kiss?
What was the matter with the first and second
that the third should be so prominent? And
wasn't there a fourth? See 'The Third Kiss.' It's
Vivian Martin's latest picture and totally different
than anything she has been seen in heretofore."

"There's a lot of difference in kisses. For instance the third kiss he gave her was
differently given and differently received than the first two! For that matter the pic-
ture 'The Third Kiss' is totally different than anything Vivian Martin has ever been
seen in on the screen heretofore. Don't miss it.,

VIOLA E

NA,. THE WILLOW PE E

ADULTS
25 CENTS
CHILDREN
10 CENTS
COME,
EARLY

SHOWS
START
TODAY
AT
2:00
3:30
7:00
8:80

"B

M
E
L
O

B
R
E

R

N

D

Y

3 DAYS STARTING SUNDAY
THE AMERICAN BEAUTY
"THE BEAUTY MARKET"
"MALE AND FEMALE" STARTS WEEK FOLLOWING

"SHOULD A WOMAN TELL?

'ENAW ELECTRIC SHOP EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL

202 E. Washington St.
Phone 273

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