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January 17, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ty to give the clothes that
-longer use to the poor
She particularly wants

If the students wish to distribute the
clothing that they are willing to give,
they may do so by procuring the name
and address of the family at the Sal-
vation Army headquarters at 425
Church street.
Many times the people are asked
to pay from 5 to 50 cents for the
clothes that they obtain so that ;they
will not feel as if they are recipients
of charity.
Tuttle's
Lunches
Nunnally's
Candy
S Maynard St.

'ait.

Irubey' s
Lunches Confectionery
eam, Delicious Sodas
ike our own Ice Cream
:ited from Fraternities and
218 S. Main Phone 166

WINDOW SHADES

Headquarters.
righten Up" finishes, best assort-
Hand-made picture frames and

ZEL

Wall
Covtrings,

INNAROOR PRISED By~
TISITINGJAP DUCATOR
"I consider Ann Arbor one of the
two finest college towns I have vis-
ited in this oountry,' 'said Prof. T.
Watanuki of .the Imperial university
of Tokio who is -visiting the different
universities of this country.
Professor WatanukiJis spending a
two and a half years' leave from his
duties, in studying the courses in so-
ciology at universities in American
and European countries with the ob-
ject of installing a new course in this
subject on his return to Japan.
He has visited numerous univer-
sities including Wisconsin, Chico,
Harvard, and Columbia. Professor
Watanuki is also studying the univer-
sities of this country for the purpose
of helping the movement in his coun-
try to model institutions of learning
more on the American plan.
Likes American Idea
Speaking of this movement, Profes-
sor Watanuki said that his country's
schools had long been formed after
the German idea, as many of their
professors had studied in Germany.
Since the beginning of the war, how-
ever, practically all of those who for-
merly went to Germany have come
to this countrS and have found that
our plan is far the better. The dif-
ference is, he continued, that the uni-
versities in this country try to make
the students do their own thinking
and also to connect their work up
more directly with everyday society.
Advocates More Visits
He said in regard to the feeling be-
tween our country and Japan and
ways of improving it: "I believe that
there should be a greater number of
brilliant students exchanged between
our countries and that more profes-
sors should travel to the Orient and
come here. This would tend toward
a better understanding between the
two nations and, materially improve
the' general education in each of them
about conditions in the other.
Professor Watanuki had intended to
spend only one week here but t the
end of a week here, he has found
Michigan so interesting and his re-
ception so friendly that he is going
to stay a month longer. From here
he will visit various cities in the East
and then go to England.
TWO MARCHES FOR
FANCY DRESS BALL
Girls who attend both Taft's lecture
and the fancy dress party can still
participate in a grand march/as there
wvill be a second one after 9:30 o'clock
for their special benefit. Awarding of
the prizes also will be postponed since
the definite hour set for the close of
the lecture will allow for one hour and
a half at the party.
Fancy dress parties began in a
small way in the late eighties, and
the Women's league has had charge
of thep since 1891. Sometimes they
took the form of book parties, and
more often of cotillions. "These par-
ties promote a democratic atmos-
phere," said Dein Myra B. Jordan,
"and have proved a real asset to
Women of the University."
In spite of the extra grand march,
the party will start at' o'clockto-
morrow night and the committee urg-
es that as many as possible be there
on time. Stunts are to be given
throghout the evening.

88 PER CENT STATE TEACHERS
FOUND TO BE OF FAIR SEX
Prof. J. W. Glover, consulting actu-
ary of the Michigan Teachers' Retire-
ment, Fund board, has prepared some
interesting statistics regarding the
age of Michigan teachers.
There are 14,553 teachers in Mich-
igan outside of Detroit. Of these, 88
per cent are women. The oldest is
a woman of 83 who has taught 66
years, and the youngpst is 17. At the
time the figures werb compiled, there
were seven women and one man who
were 17 years of age.
Party Given by Symphonic League
Symphonic league, an organization
of all the women in the School of Mus-
ic, gave a tea for its members Fri-
day afternoon in the social rooms of
the School of Music. About 60 of the
90 members were present. Refresh-
ments were served.

i

'~~ for

r

Miss Lois Baumgartner, of Chicago,
central girls work secretary of the
Y. W. C.' A., will speak to Girls' Re-
serve club leaders at 1:30 o'clock this
afternoon at Newberry hall.
All.those taking required gymnasium
work should sign up immediately on
the bulletin, board in the dressing
room for posture examinations which
will begin. Tuesday, Jan. 27.
Wyvern will meet at ,7:30 o'clock
Tuesday evening at the Chi Omega
house. At this time the new initiates
will entertain with a stunt.
Girls' freshman hockey team will
meet at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon at
Rentshler's studi, 319 East Huron
street to have picture taken.
Junior girls who have talent for
drawing are urgently j'equeted by the
play committee to make up a cover that
may be used on the program and song
book. Anyone interested will please
see Marcella Moon, '21, t'once, to
talk over plans.
College Exchanges
Purdue-The "Purdue in China" cam-
paign which is being carried en at
Purdue university at present is sim-
ply a duplication of move nts of the
same kind In many other universities.
The ultimate aim of these movements
is the education of China, especially
young men, many of whom will be
leaders in the new order. The Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, Indiana univer-
sity and the Iowa State college at
Ames are among those colleges hav-
ing similar campaigns. Universities
which have had such a movement for
some years have established a center
in which their educational activities
are carried on and have paid special
attention to education along medical
and engineering lines.
A census of the student population
of the campus is soon to take place
at Purdue. Such .a'census ws taken
In 191, 1912 and 1915. Tl"'obect of
this investigation is to find the rel-
ative density of the population of va-
rious buildings during class -periods
and also to determine the center of
population of the entire campus.
Priceton-In memory of his son
Lieut. Warden McLean, '12, who was
killed during the recent war, William
L. McLean has founded a scholar-
ship fund of $30,000. It is to be used
"to assist men of like character to-
ward obtaining an education at Prince-
ton university." Applicants must come
from schools in Pennsylvania and New
Jersey, preference -'normally being
givenyto applicantsfromschools in
Philadelphia county or, of the terri-
tory within 30 miles from Philadel-
phia.
Nortjiwestern-Unlike the outcome
of the vote taken in most of the uni-
versities of the country on the League
of Nations, the students at North-
western university voted in the ma-
jority for the League~ and Treaty
without amendments or reserva-
tions.

I

Se

1116 S.

UNIVERSITY

I
1! ..mtiai , +.. .oF.... .
That Question from a friend touches a respon-
sive chord and improves your opinion of his
j3udgement.
We are now featuring
FULL DRESS SUITS
Tailored to your "-individual measurement by
our celebrated merchant tailors--to whose un-
surpassed tailoring service this store is the gate-
way.
And bear in mind that we have but one stan-
dard of tailoring-the highest.
Ask .to see Full Dress cloth
number 9299 worsted BAra-
thea weave and our Fashion
788.
F. W.GROSS3
309 S. MAIN STREET
Exclusive Local Dealer

VAN'S . LUNC
for Quality and

& DECORATING
207 E. Liberty St.

I,'

Lms nCpy
It
Aunrm. and

RTISI NGU
LOST AND FOUND
at- LOST-K. & E. Polyphase slide rule,'

ut Tuesday A. M., New Engineering or
of Physics building. Leave at Secre-
he tary's office, U-Hall. H. E. Smith.

-A-

'i.Wy

an op-l

Ann ArDQr iSav-
hone 472-F1.
m near campus
ester. Must be
mfortable. Ad-
ily.
mgineering stu-
week end em-
rson. 719 Pack-

LOST-Grey squirrel neck-piece left
in Natural Science auditorium Fri-
day noon. Return to 616 William.
Phone 865-R. Reward.
LOST-Conklin fountain pen No. 2,
between UHall and Tappan Hall on
Thursday at 2. Finder please call
462-W.
LOSTElgin watch, silver case, gold
chain. Finder call Lane, 662-J.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Excellent single front
suite. 100 yards from campus. Hot
water heat. $8 for quiet students.
220 S. Ingalls.
FOR RENT-Very comfortable single
room, Second floor. Hot water
heat. Phone 1231-W. 810 E. Hur-1
on.
FOR RENT-Suite to rent. Termsl
reasonable. Enquire 904 S. State'
St. I
FOR SALEt
FOR SALE-Apple wood very desir-
able for fireplaces. Leugth to ord-
er. H. L. Thornton, Geddes Road.
Phone 7136-F12.

MORSE'S and
SCH RAFFTS,
CHOCOLATES

udents cans
>ur -dining
w Avenue.

Quiet student wants a
i pleasant suite or room
mpus. Reply Box H, care
A few students for
at reasonable rates.
R. 1021 E. Huron St.
oy roommate. Call Com-
and Thayer. Price, $2.50

JAN. 22 AND 23 DATES FOR
LITERARY REGISTRAT ION
All election blanks for the
second semester of .students in
the literary college must be fil-
ed in the office of the Registrar
on Thursday and Friday, Jan.
22 nd 23. The dates have been
set at this time .so that plenty
of time will be offered to in-
terview professors before the
rush of examination time.
A supply of announcements is
available in the Registrar's of-
fice and the supplementary an-
nouncement will be out next
week giving notice of a fiumber
of new courses, as well as cer-
tain corrections.
This applies only to those stu-
dents who are now members of
the literary college.
Read the Michigan Daily for i pu8
news.--Adv.

.
+

The last word in milk and
sweet coated creans, nuts

I

and fruits.

I

f

a
44

a

m or suite near
, care of Dairy.

FOR
12
'P.

SALE-Coasting bobs for sale-
ft. long. Phone 7113-F3 after 6
M.

709 N. Uni

aii u r t r nuuir ar ur rr rriuastiiinn i a i nninit

-a

; _

Pennsylvania

Party TICKETS 75c
AT UNION

'OLD

UNION
:30 S

OR

urday

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