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January 14, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

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111MLL

ASSOCIAl
PRESS
DAY AND NIGH'
SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 14 1920

ln*n Vill"

r .. - ... _ __ . ... , . ... r.. ! vya vaw4Y1 ".fff bVVw .. PRICE THE

.- ! R

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t

US-FOR TREATY COMPROMIS

LETI-CI

iENOR LIT CLASS
MEETING 'CALLED

I

GE RMANS! STAGE
PROTEST RIOTS

VUL
1OY

NAMED AS IN-
ASTIC

JTION TO BE
) IMMEDIATELY

Is Outgrowth
Athletic

Senior lits will hold an important
business meeting at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in room 205 Mason hall.
At this meeting it will be decided to
which member of the faculty the se-
nior literary section of the 1920 Mich-
iganensian will be dedicated. Ques-
tions as to pictures will be decided and
the reports of various committees will
be presented.
The finance committee and the class
treasurer are expected to have most
important reports, and a vote of the
class will be taken to determine the
amount of the class dues to be levied.
The invitation and' other committees
will also be heard from at this time.
President Hinshaw asks that a large
representation be present as the mat-
ters to be decided upon are most im-
portant.
PHYSICAL EDUCATIONT D
MEE TOBEHELD HERE
STATE COUNCIL CONVENTION TO
OPEN AT UNION TO-
MORROW

ere be constituted a stu-
.ttee under the supervision
d of directors of the Ath-
Ition whose purpose will
r the athletic intereests of
ity of Michigan."
lutlon was adopted by the
rectors of the Athletic as-
a meeting last' night. The
I work of this committee
ilar to the interfraternity

Opposition to Exploitation
Bring Virtual Revolt in
Berlin

Laws

DEMONSTRATION SPREADS TO
OTHER TOWNS; MANY KILLED
(By Associated Press)
Basie, Jan. 13.-Many persons were
killed or wounded in Berlin today
when troops fired upon or bayoneted
demonstrators who tried to rush the
reichstag entrances in protest .against
the exploitation laws, says a Berlin
dispatch.
The message adds that since noon
crowds have paraded the streets in
Berlin following an appeal from radic-
al socialist newspapers for workmen
to demonstrate in protest :against the
law.
Demand New Law
Up to 2:30 this afternoon, later dis-
patches say,'order had not been re-
stored. Big processions passed along
the 'streets converging to. the Koenigs
platz from all quarters. Numerous
factories were closed. Thedemonstra-
tors wore flags marked, "We demand'
an unrestricted workers council bill."

ART COLLECTIONS
TO BE EXHIBITED
Four art collections will be placed
on exhibition in Memorial hall at .8
o'clock next Wednesday night and
every afternoon from 1:30 to 5 for
the following two weeks.
The exhibit will consist ,of pastells
fron the collection of Mr. Georeg
Booth of Detroit and over a 100 wood
engravings from the Baum collection.
Chinese water colors of gods and god-
esses of China which were presented
to the Universit Library by Prof. I
Leo Scharfman will also be shown,
together with the water colors pre-
sented to the University by France.
ENLARGED CHIMES 1MAKES
APPEARNCE WEDNESDAY

BULLETIN

Incomplete results of the In-
tercollegiate Treaty Referen-
dum held throughout the coun-
try Tuesday are as follows:
College Propositions

(PROPOSITION FOUR RECEVES -THIE
SEVEN PER CENT OF 2949 VOTES C 0 AUT N0SUIT '~

I
Harvard ....667
Princeton ...356
Yale ....205
Columbia ..1391
Cornell.....924
Wisconsin ..631
Johns
Hopkins ,325
Maryland .. 64

11
.128
80
82
428
227,
324

III
469
381
313
436
464

TV
1113
800
930
1892
700

TUT AL BALLOT NOT AS LA
FIRST EXPECTED B
COMMITTEE
""7-
LODGE RESERVATI(
TAKE SECOND]I
F. J. Petty, '21, Attributes Sn
her to Eleventh How
4 Changes

I

REPLY TO
ONE

"A MICHIGAN MAN" IS
OF MANY ART.
ICLES

100
17

620 895
106 268
33 13

Prop.
IV.
III.
I.
I.

Students
1038
750
656
336

Faculty
78
24
58
9
169

In reply to last month's article on
"A Michigan Man,' the Chimes, which
will make its appearance tomorrow, is
running "A Michigan Woman," writ-
ten by a Michigan man. The latter is
heralded as a worthy answer to its

i which was
stitute a cam-
chool athletes
rsity. The in-
)n was a tem-
mued merely to
it high school
y through the

- The State Council of Physical Edu-
' cation will meet Jan. 15, 16, and 17
s in the Michigan Union for the purpose
- of organizing a uniform state-wide-
system of physical education for all
schools in the 'state.
1 The council is composed of 20 lead-
ers on educational wrk, and each one
* will read a paper on the subject of
physical education. From these papers
a plan for the work will be evolved,
and it will be so classified as to pro-
vide suitable physical training for all
types of students from the first grade
' to the senior class in high school.
4t is expected that this system of
physical work will tend to develop
more uniformity, all students of state
schools, in that it will provide a suit

ution
, and
Ant s

the

London, Jan. 13.-A dispatch tb the
Exchange Telegrahp from Berlin says .
"The government is taking precau-
tions against disorders including the
baracading of the front of the parlia-
ment buildings. The new railway
strikes and the stoppage of telephone
and telegraph communications are
causing much nervousness.
Disturbances Spread
Berlin, Jan. 13.- Plundering on a
Iarge scale occurred today in the oc-
supied town of Oberhausen. Men
stormed the town hall, seized arms,
threw the archives into the street and
stripped the shops. The disturbanbes
spread to the villages of Marseboh and
Bruckhausen where the plunderrs
used firearms against the police. Or-
der has not yet been restored .
TAFT TO GIE LECTURE
HERE SATURDAY NlGHTI

a committee
w up a con-
submitted to
within 60

II

L. Forbes-,
nterschol-

-operation Urged
;tee was appointed to ree-
i-laws 'of the Athletic as-
>r the purpose of codlify-
d of directors is compos-
e student managers of the
ms, the director of outdoor
id the intramural director
. This is the representa-
ing body of the students
etic association, and the
ge that all student mem-
e association co-operate
by presenting suggestions
us for their consideration.]

able exercise for all classes of peo-
ple, instead of providing only for those
who participate in athletic contests.
Among the council members who
will speak are: F. A. Rowe, state
physical- director, C. L. Brewer, coach
at M. A. C., Elmer Mitchell( intra-
mural director at the University, Dr.
G. A .May, gymnisium director.
Prof. John Griffith of the University
of Illinois will be the principal speak-
er from outside the state. Professor
Griffith is connected with the school
for coaches at Illinois, and was one of.
the leaders in charge of physical
training in the :army camps during
the war. _
The courses and exercises will be
arranged in pamphlet form so that
teachers can ascertain the, prescrib-
ed work for the different grades.
This is thse first movement of its
kind in the state of Michigan.
ALUMNI CLUBS WILL MEET
TO DISCUSS ATHLETIC PLANS

Y
J
3i
t
r

predecessor.
The number of short articles deal-
ing with matters of general interest
to the campus has been increased this
month, according to the board of di-
rectors. Two of the longer articles in
this month's issue concern athletics.
One treats with mass athletics, the
other with a school for coaches.
Neither, it is said, is supposed to solve
the present athletic situation at Mich-
igan, nor to remedy it, but both sug-
gest possible methods of bettering
these conditions.
Fiction has not been neglected, the
board of directors state. It seems
to be, they say, the general opinion of
the campus that the Chimes should
maintain a good literary department,
and with this fact in view the board
is on the lookout for all the first class
fiction it can find.
The humor column has been chang-
ed, and will, this month /contain a
number of handy household hints,
which it is said will interest such stu-
dents as have suffered from the ill
effects of prohibition.
Carrying out the idea inaugurated
last month of running a series of cov-
ers depicting local scenes, the cover
this month is a winter poster of the
Union, wh~h the board claims to be
effective. The frontispiece likewise
is of a local nature; although many
may not recognize the spot.
HOP TICKET SALE OPEN
TOAENDS SATURDAY~

Quaint Jamboree
Set for Jan, 22
Weird music of Chinese instru-
'ments, the lyrical tunes of South Am-
erican gauchos, Siberian serenades,
and last bgt not least, a little Ameri-
can jazz are Just a few of the mus-
ical strains which will greet the ears
of the assemblage at the All-Nation
Jamboree to be held Thursday, Jan.
22, in Hill auditorium.

'i
#I
I I

MBLY
EW ERA

Total 2780

(By Associated Press)
Vashington, Jan. 13.-Assembly of
council of the league of nations
Paris next Friday will mark the
,inning of a new era in interna-
nal co-operation and the firĀ§t step
rards the ideal concert of nations,
sident Wilson declared in issuing
call for the meeting as provided
the treaty of Versailles. The text
the call was made public here to-
ht,
It will bring the league of nations
3 being as a living force devoted to
task of assisting the peoples of
countries in their desire for peace,
sperity, and happiness," the mess-I
addressed to Great Britain,
nce, Italy, Japan, Brazil, Bel-!
m and Spain said. The president,
onvinced that its progress will ac-
I with the noble purpose to which
s dedicated."

Representatives of the "M" elub and
the University of Michigan club of
Detroit will meet in Detroit Jan. 17.
The purpose of this meeting will be
to discuss topics relative to the ath-
letic situation and to appoint dele-
gates to represent the organizations
at the next meeting of the athletic
board in control.
,This meeting will take place early
in February, according- toAthletic Di-
rector Bartelme, when It is expected
that a delegation from the New York,
Detroit, and Chicago alumni associa-
tions, the "M" club, the Regents, the
University senates and the Student
council will meet with the board.
FRESHMAN FOOTBALL DINNER.
TO BE HELD AT UNION TONIGHT
All men who tried out for the fresh-
men football team will attend a din-
ner at 6 o'clock Wednesday night in
I the Union.
The meeting is the first one of its
kind and the object is to see that the
men are kept eligible, that they keep
up interest in athletics, and get better
acquainted with each other. Coach:
Mather and Captain Dunphy will
speak, while several others will be
called on for impromptu talks.

Ex-Pres. William H. Taft, who will
lecture Saturday evening in Hill aud-
itorium on "Capital, Labor, and thd
Soviet," takes the same view on the
peace treaty as is expressed in propo-
sition IV of the Intercollegiate Treaty
Referendum ballot, the one that re-
ceived the most votes in yesterday's
poll. This proposition states that
there should be a compromise beti en
the Lodge and democratic reservations
so as to facilitate immediate ratifi-
cation of te treaty.
This is the same stand taken by
William Jennings Bryan. Both of
these men favored the Treaty and
League of Nations covenant as it now
stands when it first came from the
peace conference. The change in
view was taken only after discussion
had shown certain points in the treaty
would be better if slightly changed.
Mr. Taft will arrive here at 5:25
o'clock Saturday afternoon, coming
direct to Ann Arbor from Mount
Pleasant. He will be taken to the
Michigan Union, where President Har-
ry B. Hutchins will give. a dinner in
his honor. There will be one or two
invited guests in the party. After din-
ner he will go immediately to Hill
auditorium, where he will give the
address of the evening.
Because Mr. Taft must leave the
auditorium at 9:30 o'clock in order to
catch the evening train for New Hav-
en, It is requested that all persons be
in their seats by 7:45 o'clock. The
ex-president has to leave on the ear-
ly train so (that he will be able, to
attend his Monday classes in the Yale
law school, where he is a professor.
Indiana to Vote on Amendment
Indianapolis, Jan. 13. - Governor
Godrich late today called a special
session of the Indiana legislature for,
Friday fortthe purpose of ratifying
the federal'suffrage amendment.

Other attractions on the varied pro-
gram are "La Carinosa," a flirtatious
dance from' the far away Philippines,
and "Joys of Love," danced by Mlle.
Jeanette Kruszka, who has made a
brilliant record in previous Ann Arbor
performances.
Two playlets, written and acted by
a portion of Ann Arbor's foremost
dramatic talent, the first of which will
be a humorous presentation of the or-
iental's opinion of American life, will
fill out the program. The other skit,
which is entitled "His Majesty, the
King of Sahara," has its action in that
time when the ytilow sands were not]
completely dry.
Although Ann ,Arbor has been an
arid waste for many a weary month
And students have for a long time
passed the barred doors of, Joe's and
the Orient with longing eyes and
parched mouths, the management of
the Japanese predicts that this skit
will give temporary relief to even the
most anti-Christian scientist.
Official permission has been-given to
all students, faculty members, alumni,
and townspeople to attend the All-
the Tamboree predicta that this skit
may stave off the impending gloom of'
examinations, the faculty men may be-
come intoxicated by the strains of
sweet music, and Ann Arbor's four
hundred may be thrilled with glimpsesa
of the dancing maidens of the langor-
ous East.+
'22 ENGINEERS HOLD SMOKER; 1
WENLEY AND PARKER SPEAK

Sale of tickets for the J-Hop will
commence today and will close Satur-
day of this week. Applications must
be sent to Robert McKean, '21, 620
South State street, the price of the
tickets being $6.60, and all payments
must be made by check.
All applicants- must state name,
class, number of years on the campus,
and address, and must enclose a self-
addressed, stamped envelope. Frater-
nities and other organizations con-
templating house parties may send in
one application for the total number
of tickets wanted, but must append a
j list of the men desiring tickets and
1the above information concerning
[them. In such cases one check may
be made out covering the entire
amount, or each member of the group
may make out his individual check
and send it with the group applica-
tion.
Al the data will be checked and all
those applications will be discarded
which contain any incorrect informa-
tion. The cickets are non-transferable
and efforts will be made to identify
the men at the door as they enter the
Hop.
Applications are to be filled by
classes, juniors receiving first consid-
eration, then seniors, graduates, soph-
(Continu4d on Page Six)

Results Wired
Results were wired at once to
Intercollegiate Treaty Referene
headquarters in New York, where I
will be tabulated with returns f
700 colleges and univbrsities in
parts of the t country, and given
tion-wide publicity.
The University vote came as
qulmination of a week of discusi
covering all phases of the treaty,
including a large mass meeting I
Friday- in University hall, at wb
the various propositions were expl.
ed and the points for and against e
were brought out by an informal
bate. Articles by professors and c
dents who understood various aspe
of the treaty appeared in The Da
and interest in the referendum
creased until it was being studied
argued ty students among their frie
(Continued on Page Six)
H. TITUS, '11, WILL SPEAK TO
PUBLICATION MEN THURSI

' Proposition IV, favoring a cc
mise between the Lodge and
cratic reservations in order to
tate the ratification of the
treaty, won' by receiving a 3
cent of the total votes cast ,
University treaty referendum
day, polling 1,038 -student vote
78 faculty votes for a total of
Proposition III, favoring the
reservations, was second with a
of 774, and was closely follow
Proposition I, favoring rati8
without reservations or amend
which polled 714. Proposition :
posed to ratification of the tre
leagu in any form, received on
votes.
Larger Vote 'Expected
Although the-vote was not as
as had been expected by the co
tee in charge, the 2,780 student
169 faculty members who cast
ballots brought the University a
commeendable showing of Int
particularly in view of the fac
the propositions, on which many
made up their minds, were chani
the last minute by the national
endum headquarters. The con
resulting from-this is believed to
caused some to have stayed away
the, polls.-
The 2,949 persons who voted ft
35 per cent of the entire Univ
,student and. faculty bodies. 0f
numbe' the students showedby h
best turnout, 35 per cent of
number voting as compared to 2
cent of the faculty.

In the opinion of the 260 men at-
tending the get-together smoker of the
'22 Engineers was a complete sue-
cess.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, who was
scheduled to speak, was .suddenly
called out of town, his place being
filled by Prof. John C. Parker. Pro--
fessor Parker spoke briefly upon the
obligations of engineers to society,
emphasizing that the real duty of en-
gineers was to make the world a bet-
ter place to live, in. He advocated as
a means to this end, "A smashing big
vision of the social and personal prob-
lems, now confronting the coming gen-
eration."
Prof. Robert Wenley spoke on th
value of "Hobby Horses." He em-
phasized the need and worth of hav-
ing a hobby, upon which a, man
might easily become an authority,
which fact in' itself would afford him
much pleasure. Professor Wenley di-
aided hobbies Into two classes, those
pertaining to self, and those pertain-
ing to somee organization..

TRY-OUTS WANTED

desiring to try out
less side of the Ath-
r, report to the sec-
the Press building
id 5 o'clock today.

Harold Titus, '11, novelist,
speak at 3 o'clock Thursday after
in room 5 of the Ann Arbor I
building to memebrs of the' pub
tions staffs. He has announced
topic for his talk, as it will be it
nature of a forum.
Mr. Titus will speak again at
o'clock on the third floor of the U
before a meeting of Sigma Delta
of which he is a member.
While in the University, Mr. I
was managing editor of The Pail:
the same time serving as corresp
ent for the Detroit News.

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