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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-07

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7 1920.

PRIC

I b ft

VILL
EON
nrrr

I' 1

t t

I

T0.BEI

KES FIN AL
)UM ACTION
ties Will Speak and
les; to Have
at Union
s and faculty will
pity to learn all
ty of peace and
efore voting in the
dm on the treaty
the. result of Alnal
y the student coun-
meeting held Tues-
he Union.
aass meeting which
held in Hill audi-
:ht, the committee
e informal discus-
University Hall at
idents and faculty
neeting, which will
ugh explanation of
s on the ballot by
versed in the mat-
be followed by an
of various phases
embers of the Al-
hi debating clubs.
formalyopen the

DELEGATES BACK
FROM CONVENTION
Returning Monday night to Ann Ar-'
ber from the Student Volunteer con-
*erence held in Des Moines, Ia., from
Dec. 31 to Jan. 4, waore than 60 dele-
gates from the University of Michi-
gan, representing seven denomina-
tions, brought back with them the call
to American youth to spread Christian
teachings throughout the world.
Eight thousand students from al-
most every college and university in
the United States and Canada, as well
as representatives from 40 foreign
countries, assembled in the Coliseum
in Des Moines last Tuesday afternoon
for the opening meeting of the conven-
tion.
John R. Mott, secretary of the Stu-
dents' Christian federation, first ad-
dressed the vast throng of delegates.
During the five days of the conver.-
tion the delegates were addressed by
eminent missionary speakers who em-
phasized the church demand upon col-
leges for Christian leaders. Organi-
zation is already under way among
the delegates from Michigan to prop-
agate the missionary spirit through-
out the University.
MEN TO REITRfR
1 921 1 - HOP}TICKETS

SECTIONAL CLUBS -
Undergraduates Entertain Athletes
and Other School Men to
Bring Them Here
ATHLETIC COMMITTEE UNABLE
TO MAKE DEFINTE REPORT
Michigan's athletic situation was not
forgotten during the holidays if the re-
ports of numerous of the campus sec-
tional clubs may be taken as a crite-
rion. These clubs have gone about
boosting Michigan in different ways,
but to a common purpose.
At the Saginaw high school reunion,
held during the holidays and attended
by all high school 'students, practi-
cally the entire personnel of the Sagi-
naw club wasdpresent, as well as many
Michigan graduates. -While it was im-
possible to formally talk Michigan to
athletes at this meeting, such men
were approached informally, and the
assurance of the co-operation of the
alumni in a Michigan campaign was
obtained. Plans were laid for a stren-
uous campaign this spring.
Song Rook Printed
To interest especially members of
the Calumet high football team, who
were contenders for the Upper Pen-
insula championship, the Copper Coun-
try club had printed the Siren, the
official song book of the Calumet high
school. Besides containing college and
l1tgh school songs the Siren contains
a short review of Mithigan athletics
and a letter from the Copper Country
club urging Michigan as the Univer-
sity for high school seniors. The slo-
gan, printed at the bottom of each
page of the book was, "Ferry Field
next fall."
About 150 Michigan alumni and be-
tween 30 and 40 undergraduates at-
tended the smoker held during the
(Continued on Page Six)
STINSSON TO SPEAK
HERE SATURDAYNIH

Government
Lists

RAIDED: ARREST 15

Agents Unearth
of Radicals; Ioie
Others

WOMEN AT ELIS ISLAND
FIGHT MOVIE PHOTOGRAPHERS
(By Associated Press)
New York, Jan. 6.- Another raid
was made late today by department of
justice agents on the Russian soviet
newspaper Novi Mir. Fourteen amen
and one woman who were attending a;
meeting of the Communist party were
arrested. The agents also found cards
on which were the names, of 1,000
Communists throughout the United
States.
While the raid was in progress 57
more alien plotters including Alex-
ander Dorman, said to be leader of
New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvan-
ia Communists arrived at Ellis I-
land under guard to take their places
with the other hundreds swept up
in the government's dragnet of foreign
revolutionaries.
Outbreaks Reputed
At the island the first outbreaks:
since the beginning of the depart-
ment of justice raids were reported.
The "Ellis. Island soviet," established
by Emma Goldman and Alexander
Berkman and their companions- who
are now on the way to Russia on' the
"Ark" Buford came to new light in
two revolts.
-Gregory Weinstein hailed as Trot-
zky's closest friend in the United
States, and "chief of staff" Ludwig C.
A. K. Martens "ambassador" of soviet
Russia, refused .to be -photographed
and fought desperately when half a
dozen inspectors forced them to
"pose" for the official camera.
Women Fight
In the women's department 39 fem-
(Continued on Page Six)
OF R 0. T .U C COURSES

NewY

PUBLICATIONS IN
NEW OFFICES NOW
Removing from the restricted quar-
ters formerly ;used on the first floor,
campus publications are now housed,
with the reopening of college, on the
second floor of the new addition to
the Ann Arbor Press building.
Offices of the publications affected
by the change are the business and
editorial offices of The Daily, Gar-
goyle, Chimes, Michiganensian, Di-
rectory, Athletic Program, and the of-
fice of Prof. E. R. Sunderland, chair-
man of the board in control of student
publications.
The work of finishing the offices is
still under way, but the completion of
the new additions is expected shortly,
according to Professor Sunderland.
The business and editorial offices of
The Daily occupy the right half of the
addition. Offices of the other publi-
cations occupy the rest of the second
floor. They are separated from each
other by railing partitions three feet
in height. f
The entire first floor of the build-.
ing is hereafter to be used by the
Ann Arbor Press.
MEAST URGES INCREASES
IN iTECHERSSALARIES
LACK OF INSTRUCTORS BECOM.
ING CRITICAL, PROGRAM
DECLARES
(By Associated Press)
New York, Jan. 6.-Material in-
creases in teachers' salaries were urg-
ed today in a program formulated by
public education officials from nine
eastern sates as a means of reliev-
ing a critical shortage of teachers
which has closed hundreds of public
schools and, threatens to close more.
"The public schools of the nation are
facing a critical situation," says the
program. "There are being employed
as teachers, large numbers of persons
who dq not possess the qualifications'
that hitherto have been required. A
loss of students in the state normal
schools amounting to 21 to 30 per
cent and in some states 50 per cent In-
dicates that young persons are turning
their attention to other occupations
than teaching."
"Commercial 'and industrial oppor-
tunities are not only attracting teach-
ers from the schools but they are
driving away from supervisory posi-
tions in education those upon whom{
reliance for leadership should be
placed. 1
COSMO CONVENTION
TO BE HELD HERE

NE[LIBRARY -T
BE[ HELD TOOI
BUILDING BUILT ACCORDING
LATEST TYPES OF ARCH.
ITECTURE
RICHARD BOWKER WII
BE PRINCIPAL SPEAK
Reception for Faculty and Inv
Guests from 4 to 6 O'clock
This Afternoon

NAME, CLASS, AND NUMBER
YEARS ON CAMPUS TO
BE ASKED

OFI

In order to find out how many stu-
dents plan to attend the J-Hop the
Hop committee decided at a meeting

held
at

from last night to hold a registration from
which 9 to 5:45 o'clock on Thursday and Fri-
views, day in the lobby of the Union.
, will At this time the men will be asked
oh an to give their names, class, and'num-
y be ber of years on the campus. The
to se- sale of tickets will be carried on by
mail as was done 'last year, the jun-
g in- iors .being given preference and the
ritten remainder being given out in order
Lental of the number of years the"men have
Daily been on the campus.
g to In case it is found impossible to
y of give tickets to all who apply by mail,
writ- the lists obtained in thins vote will be
artic- used as a guide in alloting them.
pecial The price for the tickets was set
nten- by the committee at $6 with a tax of
1e ec- 60 cents making a total of $6.60. 1

I in The:
Accordin
secretar;
will .be

ARCTIC EXPLORER HAS BEEN OBTAINABLE AT OFFICE OF REG.

AWARDED THREE
MEDALS

.scuss his sp
'It is the i
e to- have 'th

I by a member of
y; the league of
or of civics,; the
i authority in the
and, perhaps, the
n officer who has
y of their signifi-
Interest
o create so great
lligently on the
the student and
he full resources
e put to use, and
in magazine and
ilized in the gain-

t next
e cam-
d Mar-

have different forms of
'at each may be counted
s well as added to the
ting will take place from
clock. General headquar-
day of election will be in
the first floor of the
7 College to Vete
college and university in
will ballot at the same
e results wired simujtan-
ie national referendum
i, where they will be giv-
nued on Page Six)
WILL START
ONDAY, FEB. 2

51 ENTERTAINED
BY STUDENT GIFTS
As a result of the campaign con-
ducted among the students before the
Christmas holidays, 32t boys and 19,
girls between the ages of 5 and 14
were completely clothed and enter-
tained. In addition 7 boys were cloth-
ed and 12 more enteftained.
Miscellaneous contributions, com-
bined with the moneydropped in box-
es placed about the campus, enabled
the committee in charge 'to pack 480
baskets of fruit, which, were distrib-
uted at the University hospitals by
the nurses on Christmas morning. The
local charity association was made the
recipient of the &7 remaining.
Donations made by fraternities and
sororities made it possible to furnish
both hospitals, the day nurdery, and
the community house with the Christ-
mas trees and toys needed.
AMBULANCE UNITS TO HOLD
MEETING AT UNION FRIDAY'
Section 589 and 590 of the U. S. A.
A. S. will hold a reunion banquet at
6:30 Friday evening in the Union.
All men who have seen ambulance
service in the war are invited. An
informal, get-together program has
been planned. Hal Lewis, ex-'18, in
charge of the arrangements, requests
that those planning to attend let him
know at 603 E. Williams Street.
BERGER ESCORTED OUT OF,
JERSEY CITY BY POLICE

Vilhjalmur Stefansson, scientist anda
explorer, who willteure at 8 o'clock'
Saturday evening' in Hill auditorium,
has had three medals bestbwed on him
for his achievements in the arctic re-
gions.
Peary Presents One ' v
A year ago in December the Am-
erican Geographical society gave him
the Daly medal. In January the Geo-
graphical Society of America award-
ed him the Kane medal, and the Na-
tional Geographical society honored
him with the Hubbard medal, Rear-
Admiral Robert E. Peary, discoverer
of the north pole, presenting it to
him.
It was through Stefansson's efforts
that more than a quarter of a million
miles of land in the arctic regions
regions were mapped.'
Originates Expedition
Stefansson originated and planned
the Storker Strokerson expedition,
which made several important scien-
tific discoveries, but he was prevent-
ed from taking this trip at the last
moment because of illness. The party
started from Victoria, . C., in June
1913, the original plan being to study
barren arctic wastes for the Canadian
government. Though it failed in its
original purpose, many important facts
were established.
FORMER INSTRUCTOR VISITS
COLONEL LUCAS OFFICIALLY
Lieut. G. I. Back, who was in charge
of the training detachment for tele-
phone lectricians of the signal corps
at the University during the war, vis-
ited Colonel Lucas Tuesday on offi..

ISTRAR ARTHUR G.
HALL
Pamphlets explaining' in detail the
courses in military science and tactics
for students in the literary college
have been published and are now 'eb-
tamnable in the registrar's offlee, ac-
cording to Registrar Arthur G. Hall.
Special attention is called to the
fact that all literary students who en-
roll in, these courses before Feb. 7.
1920, will be given credit towards a
commission but not towardsgradua-
tion for the present semester's work.
According to Lieut. Col. Robert Ar-
thur, students electing the prerequi-
site course A 1 in military science, and
tactics before Feb. 7 will be recom-
mended for a commission if their work
merits it, while those waiting until
next fall to enroll will probably be re-
quired to take an examination before
a.commission is awarded.
The pamphlet states that all mill-
tary courses must be elected in the
same manner as any other course, and
also must be upon the regular elec-
tion blank.
The first prerequisite course A 1 of
the basic group of military courses is
given by Lieut. Col. John P. Lucas,
and offers one hour credit. It con-
sists of organization, military cour-
tesy, discipline, infantry, arms and
equipment, firing manual, hygiene,
first aid, sanitation, minor tactics,
morale.
The advanced group of courses treat
of subjects pertaining to the coast ar-.
tillery. Successful , completion of
both the basic and advanced group of
subjects together with attendance at a
specified summer camp accompanying
the latter will lead to a recommenda-
tion for commission as officer of the
reserve corps.
Additional information concerning
the courses may be obtained from Col-

Michigan's new general library Sai
by persons of authority to be the fin
est university library in the countr
will be formally opened and dedicate
today.
The dedication exercises, at whic
Richard R. Bowker of New York, edi
tor of the Library Journal and th
Publisher's Weekly, will be the princi
pal speaker, are to be at 3 o'cloc , I
Hill auditorium. Albert Kahn of De
troit, architect of the building,, wil
tell of its structure, and LibrarianW
W. Bishop also will give a brief talT
Reception for Faculty
There will be a reception in thi
Library from 4 to 6 o'clock for te
faculty and invited guests, and att
o'clock the building .will be opene
for public inspection. During the ex
ercises there will be no classes, ani
the present library quarter will b
closed after 2:30 o'clock. tnIversit:
officials have urged that everyone at
tend the dedication who can.
The new building was built accord
ing to the latest type of architecture
special consideration being given t
the lighting and fire-proof propertie
The building Is.177 feet wide,. 200 fee
long and fortr stories high. The sideo
are of modern loft type, while thi
front, which faces the campus mall,. I
an academic adaption of .;the sam
style. There are different plaques oi
the front of the building, each repre
senting a branch of learning of whic
there are books in the library.
Tennessee Marbe Used
The entrance hall is panelled witi
marble from 'ennessee quarries, th
panelling extending neary to the cell
ing. Above the panels are Pompeia
paintings, which were done by Thoma
di Lorenzo, an American of Italiai
descent. These paintings are on bot]
sides of the hall, while at the end o
the hall there is the following mott
in Latin:
"The voice of the books is one, bu
it does teach all alike."
On each side of the hall are stair
ways leading to the second floor. T
the right as one enters the building i
the students' stidy room. The floor
ing in this room, which is the sam
as that in the main reading room am
hall on the second floor, is a specia
flecked cork tiling that was brough
from Spain. Besides doing away wit
noise, this flooring will not chip u
like ordinary cork tile. To the left o
the entrance hall is a student locke
room.
Barrel Vaulted Ceilings
The main reading room is on the
second floor and extends across the
front of the building. The ceiling ii
high and of the barrel vaulted type
At each end of the room is a paintini
by Gari Melchers, one being th<
"Arts of Peace" and the other the
"Arts of War." These paintings, whic
were exhibited at the World's Fair I
Chicago, were secured by the fieb
museum in Chicago, but were latel
obtained by this university, and wer
in University Hall for a long time
The room is lighted by indirect light
from the tops of the book cases, whici
are about 10 feet from the floor. Th1A
room can accommodate about "03
persons at one time.
The delivery corridor is also on the
second floor. It contains the card eat
alogues, circulation desk, and deliver
counter. The pffices of the staff are'om
(Continued on Page Six)

Prof. J. A. C. Hildner and A. M. El-
kind, '19, representatives of the Mich-
igan Cosmopolitan club at the recent
national convention in Syracuse, suc-
ceeded in securing the next annual
convention for Ann Arbor.
Michigan was almost unanimously
chosen in preference to the competing,
universities on account of the large
size of its chapter and its central loca-
tion. President Harry B. Hutchins
wired a cordial invitation to the dele-
gates to attl'nd the 1920 convention in
Ann Arbor. A telegram was also re-
ceived from the Detroit Chamber of
Commerce inviting the members to
visit Detroit and to be present at a
banquet to be given in their honor.
Representatives of 20 universities
attended the Syracuse convention.
Among the many speakers were two
Michigan graduates, Charles Hurrey,
secretary of the committee of friendly
relations among foreign students, and
Dr. N. S. Hardiker, who came from
New York to speak on India.
It was decidei to hold an interna-
tional congress in Montivideo, Urug-
uay in 1921 and f preliminary con-
gress next August in Geneva.
SAY YANKS PAID .BOSTON.
$125,000 FOR BABE RUTH
Los' Angeles, Jan. 6.-Miller Hug-
gins, manager of the New York Am-
ericans, left for home today with the
announcement that he had closed with
"Babe" Ruth to play with New York
next year. Huggins said that he and
Ruth had come to satisfactory terms
and everybody 'concerned was satis-
fied. He declined to state just what
was paid to the Boston club for Ruth,
but said it was ;bout $125,000.

en-I

d close Thursday
tead of the series
for the past three
the place of the
n the engineering
exa~pinations will
time the examina-
y college are go-

Jersey- City, N. J., Jan. 6.-Victor L.
Berger, representative elect from the
fifth Wisconsin district, was escorted
out of Jersey City tonight by Chief
of Police Richard Battersby. His :de-
parture followed promptly his arriv-
al in the scheduled role of principal
orator at a widely advertised mass
meeting under the auspices of the so-

cial business. onel Arthur, room 241 of the Engi-
neering building.
Students Have Union Church Service Union Directors to Meet Thursday
Combining the young people's serv- The Union board of directors will
ice for the various churches of the meet at 12:15 o'clock Thursday noon
city, a union student meeting was when the final consideration of the
held Sunday night in Hill auditorium, new constitution will be had. Other
Prof. W. D. Henderson was the important matters will alsg be
speaker. brought up..,

COUNCIL MEETING

A meeting of the Student
council will be held at 7:15
o'clocl tonight in room 306 of
the Union. 1

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