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December 14, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-12-14

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the use for
not otherwise
therein.
an, as second

Arbor,

ridence 0f
i at the
iy office.
No man,
tge.
niests ex-

ran

-.Managing Editor
Phone 24t,} or roi6
Jr. ..... ......Business Manager
Phone 96o o 2838
.... ....Asst. Managing Editor
...City Eaitor
.Sports Editor
......................... .Women's Editor
in ..........................Telegraph Editor
EDITORIAL BOARD
H. Hardy Heth
, Jr... ..........AAdvertising Manager
...Issue Manage~r
.Office Manager
.Publication Manager
.............. ..Circulation Manager
... .Subscription Manger
. . . .. .Guillotine Editor
.... .. ..... ... Music, Editor
... . Literary Editor
Exchange Editor
.Camaign Editor
. .. .. . . . . . . . .Efficiency Editor

rectors of the Athletic association of which every
student who pays the athletic fee with his tuition,
is a member. True; the directors are elected by the
'Athletic association ; but to-confer upon these seven
directors including the director of outdoor athlet-
ics, the power of selecting three men to represent
'the student body is obviously the antithesis of any
attempt at personal representation. Nor would we
advocate any such chimerical scheme as the actual
presence of the student .body at the deliberations
of the Board in Control of Athletics. It is too
true that representation can only be through a lim-
ited few. But it is therefore all the more important
that these few be so chosen as to insure their genu-
ine representation of the vast body they stand for.
If three men are to be considered sufficient repre-
sentation of 8,ooo students on a board of ii mem-
bers, it is absolutely .essential that these men be
elected directly and that when they assume their
duties, they be given full voice in every delibera-
tion of that board whether these sessions be "emer-
gency" or otherwise.
If the Athletic association and hence the student
body, could be made to feel that it was directly
electing its representatives on the board that largely
controls the destinies of Michigan athletics, and
that these- representatives were actually expressing
the students' sentiments for consideration in every
athletic undertaking, there is little doubt that that
degree of representation would have been attained
which leads to personal interest and ultimate serv-
ice. Then, it would seem, the student body would
be more than a step nearer to the solutions of those
questions which have only served to baffle them
thus far.
If th'ere is one born every minute, the fellow who
thinks lie's "pulling something on the teacher" when
he doesn't get his lessons wasn't born on. the half
minute
The old fashioned college -man who knew all the:
"barkeeps" at the Orient by their first name now
has a son here whdo takes his "coke" with a little"
lemon.

I

m m

Offiola

HAM'S

BOTH ENDS OF
DIAGONAL WALK

M

r

S DETROIT UNITED LINES fIIllltlrdlllllil1ll11lIllltlllflitlltltlititll
(Oct. 26, igig) .
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson E The M '*ihi'ah
(Eastern Standard Time) g
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:ro a.
mn., and hourlto 9op. m as l . h - e. v
Jackson Limited and Express Car8:48 asily the best ev
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (EX edition 75 cent
presses make local stopsweto Ann Arbor.}-I) L iL
Local Cars East Bound-6:o5 a. m., 9 toa.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. m., 10:50
t;, . 1" o Ypsilanti only, i r: p.Mi., 1 :101=
a. m., and to Saline, change at psilanti.
Ypsilanti. A HR'
Local Cars West Bound-7 :48 a. M. and
:2:20 a. 'l m.~11t111IIIIIIIjIIIII1111111'

"I'

Cale
er -L
s each.
UNIVE
SBOK

Caedra

. -owvww"

EDITORS
,H. Adams

Jr.

Brewster Campbell
John I. Dakin

:AL STAFF
ike Dorothy Monfort
robleski Minnie Muskatt
amport Robert C. Angell
.Gurk Robert D. Sage
Biethan Thomas J. Whinery
SS STAFF
arnum D. P. Joyce
lmquist Robt._Somerville

:wton Arthur
ill F. M.

to secure information concer
ly should see the issue editor
be printed that night.

r 1. GlazerT
HeathI
ning news for
, who has full

.e editors for the week are as follows:
-. Riley, Monday night; Thornton W.
r., Tuesday night; Brewster P. Cam-
nesday night; John I. Dakin, Thursday
>rge Brophy, Friday night ; Thomas
turday night.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14 1919.
VICE VIA REPRESENTATION
ily today contains a list of 38 questions'
rs compiled with the idea of at least par-
ring up the befogged'atmosphere which
ersist in enveloping the 1919 Athletic Sit-

.. I

is absolutely imperative that every man who
his name with the University of Michigan
arize himself with the' points here involved..
ust do this as a step towards acquiring that'
nation relative to athletics at Michigan which
11 be expected to possess when he reaches home
he Christmas holidays. If he cannot answer
surely the outsider cannot be looked to for
nation, and Michigan must suffer in conse-
:e.
e evidence with regard' to the questions of fi-
a 'unsoundness of the Board in Control of Ath-
discrimination in the selection of football ma-
and inefficiency in the coaching system, as
>ped in the questionnaire, seems sufficiently
ded to make further prosecution of them un-
tant. There are, however, certain questions
regard to the administration' of things athletic
chigan which still defy solution.
e departing words of Coach Fielding Yost,
y man owes a duty of service," left a decided
ssion upon the minds of many of us. The stu-'
realizing that as a vital part of the vast en-
illed Michigan they were obliged to cast about
Leir particular means of se-vice, have, for the
part, been unable to get farther than such plat-
as "Support the team," "Turn out for ath-
"and "Bring men to Michigan who will help
Jniversity." As has been suggested by the'
gan Chimes, the question is far too involved
-mit of such a casual settlement.
has often been said that the key to effective
nment lies in the satisfactory representation
ery part of that government. Likewise, it has
been said that the individual is invariably of
e to the whole only insofar as he is personally
ented in that whole. In other words, it is,
ersonal touch, the feeling of personal respon-
y that stimulates to deeds of service.
nce, to localize these theories, it would appear.
f the student body of Michigan are to be of
num service in the conducting of athletics, they
possess this personal representation in the ad-'
tration of athletics. But does the student body
s this representation?
very student at Michigan were to be asked in
way he was represented on the University's
in Control of Athletics, it is safe to say that
9o per cent would be unable to answer with-
)nsulting authorities. Is this the personal.rep-
ation conducive to Service?
student body is represented on the Board in
of of Athletics by three men whom they elect
a ticket put before them by the Board of Di-

The GuillotineN
Futuristic fiction.
(By Rene Czanne of the Parisian Beax Arts)'
A DESERT' ROMANCE
Pyramids against the sky * * * * shimmeribg
sea of sand * * * * thudding of footfalls ** * * *
stars streaking overhead *** * *
Abou Ben Beanerie was sailing across the arid
waste upon his ship of the desert. With a bump
and a continual thump Palmolive, the shriek's
daughter, was draped artistically on the camel's
second hump. Thy were eloping and Palmolive's
pup-pah with his study henchman were pursuing
them upon a bevyof trained hippopatimi. She was
chewing Spearmint.
"Hast 'thou thy trousseau, light of mine eyes ?
he asked.
"Aye, my lord," she replied in gum arabic.
"Three linen dusters and a satchel of insect pow-
;der."
On and on they went through the velvet night.
* * * * * puh-pah shoots blunderbuss * * *
whistle of door knobs, flat irons and bric-a-brac
'* ** ** wind in oasis * * * * * moon-low in sky
But the camel-was lower and became winded. As-
there was no free air station in the offing he closed
his eyes and expired. But Abou Ben Beanerie,
breathed a prayer to Allah and took another one
out of his cigarette case. He was a truck gardener
and couldn't be beet. So they galloped on
sand strom * * * * * long hours of agony' * * *
terrible thirst * * * * throats caked with powder
* * * ** also Palmolive's nose * *** * *despair.
For weeks and weeks they went on this way and
gradually they became weaker. Finally their last
bit of water cress gave out so they lay down to die
of thirst-even as you and I.
"Our time has come," said Palmolive in muf-
fled tones because her heart was in her mouth.
"I'll look," Abou answered as he took out his In-
gersoll. He had a lantern jaw and could see in
the dark.
"Saved! Saved!" he shouted.
HE FOUND A SPRING IN HIS WATCH.
Wheezes of Yester-Year
Innocent-People say that I have eyes just like
my father.
Drowsy-Uh-huh. Pop eyed.
PRIVATE PEAT ANGRY AT BOLSHEVIST
HECKLERS.-News. He simply smouldered with
indignation.
Our Daily Novelette
"I heard dat Maggie fainted at the Labor Temple
last evening."
"Yep, she feinted with her left and landed on the'
bouncers,' jaw with her right."

I Communications,
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
In reply to yesterday's communica-
tion I wish first to disclaim vigor-
ously any intention to be impertinent
or witty. The. communication of the
12th inst., had the purpose of pointing
out fallacies in the sugestions of
Mr. Johnson, and of making construe-
live proposals of .a suitable method
for bringing .literary celebrities to
Michigan.
I suggested that the visits of such'
distinguished men be engineered by
the students themselves. This plan is
greatly strengthened ,by the informa-
tion disclosed by Professor Wenley
that only $1000 per year is available
for such purposes. It can be 'safely
assumed and predicted that our mast-
ers will not see the feasibility of in-
creasing this pittance. Consequently
as Professor Wenley suggests, some
private individuals will have to fin-
ance such enterprises. It is my plan
,that the small group of students who
are literary cognoscenti combine'-with
other students having business aility
equal to that of the advertising man-
ager of the Chimes. Such a group,
should have 'no difficulty in turiilshiirg
us with the "best there is," as Mr.
Johnson demiands.
Finally, it was not my ntention to
insinuate thatanyone has ever been
prevented from lecturing here because
he or she possessed' poltcal views of
a heretical nature. On the contrary,
eve~y one knows that the op osite
spirit prevails. Only two weeks ago,
,Langdon Davies, a rabid left-wing so-
cialist spoke in the Natural Science
auditorium.
MEIDIC, '12.
ROTARY CLUB REQUESTS NAMES
OF RELATIVES OF MEMBERS
Students whose fathers or brothers
are members of Rotary clubs in oth-
er cities are requested by the Rotary
club of Ann Arbor to send their names
to the local organization. The Inform-
ation which the Rotary club wants is
only the name of the student and the
name of the club to which his relative
belongs. It should be sent to George
E. Lewis, secretary, Ann Arbor Rot-
ary club.
Breakfasts-
We still serve 'em
Suppers-
Call on us this evening
GREY SHOP
Liberty at Maynard

AN'ARRORCHOP SUIEY
Excellent CHOP SUEY from
11:30 a. mi. to midnight
Steaks and Chops 414 S. State

The SWAIN do ti

For Satisfactory Amateur
Finishing leave your Films
at

Quarry's

Drug

The Spirit of Musi
finds its most beautiful and harmon
ious expression through instruments o
fine musical quality. Investigate th
quality goods listed here.
Henry F. Miller and Mehlin Pianos, $500.00 to $1000.04
Victor Victrolas from $25.00 to'$500.00
Martin Guitars, Mandolins and Ukeleles, $12.00 to $60.00
Buescher Saxophones, $110.25 to $168.25
Orpheum Banjorines, Mandolin and Tenor Banjos, $60.00
Violins, new and old, $10.00 to $175.00

SCHLANDERER & S
113 E.1

*

Schaeberle & Son Music House

110 S. MAIN STREET

f

i

A I I

I

CHRIsMAS HINTS

- SHOP EARLY -
Choose your Xmas presents n ow
WHY NOT GIVE A

Portable Lamp
Washing Machine
Sewing Machine
Toaster

All

Electric

Iron, or

4

Better Prices

at

OREN'S
for
"Good Eats"
1121 South
University Ave.

Vacuum Cleaner
You can have any appliance set aside for
Xmas. Come in and decide while the selec-
tions are good.
-Cash or Terms -
The Detroit Edison Co.

That new dance-the Ann Arbor Press.,

Famous Closing Lines
"That's me all over Mable," said the aviator as
they picked him up in the dustpan.

11;

'

LOUIS XVI.

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