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October 02, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-02

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DAY AND N
I'D SER

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1919.

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ITH
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NEW HANDBOOK TO
TELL CAMPUS LORE
"Will You Do It," is the name of the
handbook which the Union is publish-
ing for the benefit of newcomers to
Michigan. It contains hints to those
who are not sophisticated in the ways
of the campus, as well as a history of
,he Union, its spirit, and purpose. A
short article on the athletic prospects
is an added feature of the booklet.
President Hogan and General Sec-
retary Hurley of the Union, are re-
sponsible for this handbook. The lat-
ter 4tates th9 purpose of it in these
words: "T ere are so many new
students on the campus that they must
have some way of. learning not only
of the school's benefits but of their
duties and obligations to it, and to the
Union,( the one great democratic or-
ganization of the school."
This book is to be a regulai insti-
tution in years to come and will fill
a big want.
TWO WHITES ANDSETEN.
BLAKSDIE IN RACE RIOT

of Dailies;
ams at

s, only
for 84
by ,its

REUTHER BECOMESo ogo
Wins Furst Series' Battle for Cincy
By Own Ability; Cicotte is
Forced From Box
ELLER WILL PITCH SECOND
FOR REDS; WILLIAMS FOR SOX
Score By Innings
1 23 4 5 6 7 8 9-R. H. E.
Chicago- 010 0 0 0 0 0 0- 1 61
Cincy. -,. ,0 0 5 0 0 12 1 x- 9 14 1
(By Associated Press)
Cincinnati, Oct. 1.-Cincinnati, to-
day, won the opening game of the
world series from the Chicago Amer-
icans by a score of 9 to 1.
Every series develops a new idol
for the fans and Walter Ruether who
pitched the Reds to victory was the.
unanimous choice tonight. He not
only held the White Sox to 6 scat-
tered hits, and really deserved a shut
out, but rolled up a batting average
of 1,000 for himself.
Wonder of Battle
If there was anything in the game
that was better than his pitching it
was his work with the stick' Two of
his three hits were mighty triples. He
drove in two runs, scored one him-
self and was the instigator of the
mad romping of Redlegs around the
bases in the fatal fourth. The Sox
were in the fight up to-that time, but
when. Reuther propelled the ball into
left center and romped around to- third
with two scoring ahead of him, the
heart seemed to go out of the Ameri-
can leaguers.
It was a bad day for Eddie Cicottee,
leading pitcher of the Junior league.
Never before was so decisive a beat-
ing administered to the Michigan won-
der. He was simply counted out of

BELGIUM MONARCH
TO ARRIVE TODAY
(By Associated Press)
New York, _ Oct. 1.-Albert First,
soldier king of the Belgians, the first
reigning monarch of Europe, to land
in the United States, with Queen Eliz-
abeth and Crown Prince Leopold will
arrive at Hoboken tomorrow morning,
on the transport George Washington.
They will remain in the United
States 26 days and in that time will
travel from coast to coast, ending
their tour at Washington where they
will be guests at the White House for
three days.
The royal visitors will be grpeted
by Vice-President Marshall and Mrs.
Marshall as the personal representa-
tives of President Wilson and Mrs.
Wilson, who will be unable to leave
Washington because of the illness of
the nation's chief executive.
Secretary Lansing and his third as-
sistant, Breckenbridge Long, will wel-
come them on behalf of the State De-
partment, while Secretary Baker and
General Peyton March, chiefIof staff,
will extend the army's greetings to
one of Europe's most heroic soldiers.

Victims
to

of Housing Situation Urged,
Give Full Information
Promptly By Letter

and

FACULTY BACKS UNION CAMPAIG
A6AINST ROOM RENT PROFITI
HURLEY REQUESTS 5TUDEN

CONTRACT VIOLATION AND PRICE
BOOSTING ALLEG-
ED
OFFICIALS TO DECIDE
JUSTICE OF CHARGES

of a
Lit the
wners
case
- a t~

-

RACE FEUD IN ARKANSAS
COMES CRITICAL; POSSE
FIRED UPON

BE-

'CHEER LEADERTRYOUTS
PLANNED BY CO0U N CI

L1

inter-
the en-
to Ann
supply
I up.a
college

Helena, Ark., Oct. 1. - Two white
men, Clinton Lee and J. A. Teppen
of Helena and seven negroes are
known to bet dead at Elaine,. near
here, as the result of clashes today be-
tween a posse seeking for the per-
son who, last night, from ambush,'
fired upon and killed W. D. Atkins.
railroad official agent, according to
reports ' reaching here tonight. A
third white man, Ira Proctor, and a
number of negroes are known to have,

of

tion at Elaine is- critical
g more so, according to

nging
emina

at

litto

DEBATE
tY- NOV. 1

or Brumn
g- in West

3oothrPublishing company
the Grand Rapids Press, the
urnal, the Saginaw News-
the Bay City Times- Trib-
Jackson Citizen-Patriot, and
kegon Chronicle. Its policy
ese papers, which will also
the Times-News, is express-
s syndicate slogan: "GConsci-
edited in the best inter-
il classes of the people."
ing to President Booth, who
n Arbor for two days taking
paper, the same management
1nue with the exception of the
wnership. Harlan H. John-
retain his place as editor
. Van Alstin will remain the
ng manager. There will,
be a considerable change in
to the paper~s readers. In
to thenew Universitysde-
the Booth firm's full leased
ociated Press service will be
with all the news advan-
the great metropolitan news-
wvhile the Booth news bu-
Washington and Lansing will
irect and immediate reports
ment on state and national
About 50 newspaper men are
d. with the syndicate which
.in operation for five years.
Business for 30 Years
ooth Publishing company is
f men who have been asso-
Michigan newspaper busi-
30 years. Ralph H'!Booth,
ident, manages the general
F the firm from the main of-
Detroit. George S. Booth,
of the board, is the pub-
the Detroit News. Edmund
h, vice-president, is mana-
ae Grand Rapids Press, and

Society tryouts to choose debaters,
who will compete for places on teams
which meet Northwestern and Chicago
in Central League contests next Jan-
uary, must be .finished by Saturday
evening, Nov. 1, it was announced
yesterday by the oratory department.
Candidates have four weeks to pre-
pare their arguments on the nation-
alization of mines.
Adelphi, Alpha Nu, and Athena are
each entitled to six representatives.'
If either Jeffersonian or Webster,
law debating societies, are revived,
they will be allowed six. From speak-
ers so chosen the oratory department
staff will choose. six to represent the
University and two as alternates.
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, head of
the oratory department, expressed
himself yesterday as believing that
the4 prospects for winning teams ikn
both Central and Midwest leagues
this year are better than for some
time. \.
STEEL STRIKE UNCHANGED;
MAGNATES CLAIM GAINS
Pittsburg, Oct.- 1.-Nothing devel-
oped in the Pittsburg district today to
aaterially change the situation.
Strike leaders and their organizers
showed the usual activity in their
campaigns to further cripple the big
plauts in operation in this territory.
Steel company officials had little in-
formation to impart except the daily
claim that more men were constant-
ly applying for work each day.
DENTAL COLLEGE HAS LARGEST
ENROLLMENT IN ITS HISTORY
The College of Dental Surgery be-
gan its sessions Wednesday morning
with the largest enrollment in Its
history. Nearly 400, of whom 175
are freshmen, were registered up to
4 o'clock .Tuesday.
Many upperclassmen who volun-
teered for military service are return-
ing to finish their courses this year.

the box.
Ace Sent to Showers
Five runs were recorded against him
in the fourth before Manager Gleason
gave him the sign to retire. Hisj
teammates, gathered around him and
patted him encouragingly on the back
but he walked from the diamond with
his head hanging. Roy Wilkinson suc-
ceeded him on the mound while the
last inning was- pitched by .Grover
Loudermilk, but it'made little differ-
ence to the National league leaders.
They kept the' air fairly clogged with
hits- while the Sox fielders ran their
legs off after terrific flys.
After the game Gary Herrmann own-
er of the Reds who came panting up
to the runway on the' grandstand stop-
ped long enough to remark to fans:
Herrmann Joyous
"Those dopesters who were figuring.
Cincinnati 'second did not figure on
our batting pitchers. We've got two
more like Reuther, they've all been
batting around 300 all season."
The day was clear and hot and 30,.
501 enthusiasts witnessed the contests.
Manager Gleason said that tomorrow
he would probably send Claude Wil-
liams into the box while Manager
Moran of the Reds was said to be
planning to use Hod Eller, the shine
ball artist.
BISHOP BURCH, '75 ELECTED
PERMANENT HEAD OF DIOCESE
The Rev. Charles Summer Burch,
'75, former football and baseball star
of the University and president of his
class in his senior year, has recently
been ele'6ted permanent bishop of the
Protestant 4iscopal diocese of New
York.
Bishop Burch used to be University
of Michigan correspondent -for the old
Detroit Union. It was while here that
he made his decision to enter the min-
istry. After leaving school he went.
into the publishing business in Chi-
cago and later becatre editor for the
Grand Rapids Evening Press.
He studied for the ministry at Ox-
ford. He conducted missions until in,
1905 his newspaper work came to an
end, and he became rector of St.
Andrew's church, Staten Island. A
year later he became archdeacon. In
threeyears he was suffragan bishop,
and only 14 years from the time he
was ordained, he reached his present
position.
The diocese over which the bishop
administers includes 265 organized
parishes, 80 missions, and scores of
charitable institutions. Bishop Burch
says he believes that his newspaper
work gave him a large part of his

FRESHMAN DISCIPLINE, RENT
PROFITEERING ACTED
UPON
It was decide at the meeting of
the Student cotincil last night to re-
establish the competition method of
selecting a Varsity cheer leader.
There was not much need for a cheer
leader last year, and one was ap-
pointed temporarily. Tryouts for the
position will be held Saturday at the
Case game and at the M. A. C. pep
meeting. All - students, excepting
freshmen, ar eligible and may report
to C. E. Bottin, '20E, at 4:30 o'clock
Thursday and Friday at the Union.
The problem of disciplining fresh-
men was considered. Collective dem-
onstrations against first year men will
not be tolerated, according to Carl
E. Johnson, '20, president of the coun-
il.
Profiteering in rooms will be in-
vestigated by the Student council.
Any student who feels that he is be-
ing charged an exorbitant price for
his room may submit his case either
in writing or n person io D. D.
Nash, '20. Nash will be in the Stu-
dent council rooms on the third floor
of the Union from 1 to 2:30 o'clock
on Tuesday and Thursday after-
noons, or he can be reached at other
hours by calling 1505. Such claims
if found to be just will be taken up
with University officers.
Plans were discussed for holding
the class elections in the near fu-
ture. It is probable that all lit elec-
tions will be held next week. .
Two members of the council who
'did not appear at the meeting were
dropped and their places will be fill-
ed at the next lection. Meetings will
be held at 7 o'clock on Wednesday
night of every week.
SENATORS TO VOTE
ON ,AMENDMENTS
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 1.-The first vote
on amendments on the German peace
tre'aty will be taken in the senate to-
morrow afternoon.
Formal agreement was reached late
today by Republican and Democratic
leaders to call up at 2 o'clock the
36 amendments proposed by Senator
Fall, Republican, of New Mexico, adop-
tion of which would eliminate the
United States from representation on
the numerous foreign committees cre-
ated by the treaty. The agreement
provides for discussion under the five
minute rule and a vote before ad-
journment tomorrow night. 1
FORMER DAILY ADVERTISING
MANAGER BACK IN SCHOOL.
Harry R. Louis, ex-'19, has returned
to Ann Arbor to complete his course in
the University. He left school in
June, 1917, and has been in-the service
for 26 months, 16 months of which
he spent in France.
While -in the University Louis was

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
The Michigan Union, through its stu-
dent rooming s'rvice, has had brought
to its attention numerous complaints
against the landladies concerning high
and unreasonable rent charges for
rooms let by them to students;, for
open violation of contracts, whereby
rooms engaged at one price and pay-
ments made to bind it, were rented
to another at a higher price, or refus-
ed to the student unless a higher price
was paid. Many of these complaints
were made openly, but many more
were brought to us indirectly.- The
committee in charge of the service
desk reports a clearly defined opinion
among the students that profiteering
of a flagrant type is being practiced.
Union Will Determine facts -
Naturally, since the Union has in
charge this very important service,
we are anxious to go to the bottom o
the matter and to determine from act-
ual facts what the situation really is.
The room comAiittee clearly recognize
that increases in room rent are nec-
essary to keep due pace with the in-
creased cost of living, and that some
rooms are vorth more than others,
but 'neither of these facts warrant any
wholesale increases in rents to stu-
dent roomers.
To settle this question quickly and
fairly for all parties interested, the
Union room committee request that
every student who feels that he is a
victim of profiteering address a letter
to George F. Hurley, general secretary
of the Michigan Union, and in this let-
ter give the following facts: --
Name and address of landlady and
location of house with respect to the
campus.
Construction and size of house.. -,
Size of room or rooms and number
living - in them...
Location of room in the house and
number of windows. -
Furnishings -of room.
Sanitaryrfacilities of house.
Kind of heat and light and whether
or, not there is a telephonie in the
house. /
Number of students an other peo-
ple living in house.
Rent paid for room per week.
Rent paid for other rooms in house
if it can be ascertained.
What rent was paid by the sign-
er of the letter for a room during the
-school year 1916-1917 if he was then
in school.
Letters Confidential
Such letters will be treated as con-
fidential and will be used onlyby the
University authorities and the com-
mittees. These letters will be filed in
the order of their .receipt. It is hop-
ed that the letters will be sent to us
promptly. %
It is further desired that all stu-
dents who were in attendance at the
University before the war, inform the
committees as to what rent they paid
for rooms at that time.
The Union joins with The Daily in
desiring an early solution for it.
Sincerely,
GEORGE F. HURLEY,
General Secretary.
Hobart Guild Entertains with Dance
A feature of the Hobart guild's wel-
come to student members of the
Episcopal church this . week will be
an informal dance at 8 o'clock on
Friday night at Harris hall. Admis-
sion will be by invitation.
Miss Douglas to Give Reception '
A reception for newcomers will be.
held from 5 to 6 o'clock next Sunday

,afternoon at the home of Miss Dou-
glas,-502 E. Huron street. It is hoped
that a large number of new students
will be present.

PRESIDENT HUTCHINS
MEETING TO DISCI
PROBLEM
SEES DORMI'T'ORIES
ULTIMATE SOL
Regent Beal Suggests Sub-.
Vacant Houses to Re
Congestlon
As a result of the inve
-of the roomiig situation, a
of Regent J. E. Beal, Secret
ley Smith, and George F.
genjeral secretary of the U
called Wednesday afternoon
ident Harry B. Hutchins in
to give official faculty suppc
relieving students suffering
leged profiteering by Any Ar
ladies.
Unanimous sanction'was
the accompanying letter w
Hurley believes will to a gr
s'olve the problem.
All students are requested
'out the instructions in Hurl
so that definite facts will
hands of the Housing comn
abling them to take immedia
President Hutchins Sup
President Hutchins gav
support to the campaign, w
to place eVery student in (
and reasonably' priced ac
tions. Regent Beal also api
plan. The president further a
even though the cost to tho:
'the rooms had increased it
'way proportionate to the p

that the committee's canvas
ed west of Main street. Thes
while not as convenient as t
are near the campus, are off
considerably lower average z
those that are within a sh
tance from the campus. Mos
are within 15 minutes wal
University buildings and are
being occupied by students
fuse to fall in lin with ti
of certain landladies.
May Build Dormitoric
One of, the reactions that
ident foresaw as an outvom'
present situation was the bt
'dormitories- for men. He st
4n view of existing yondit
'suggestions of Michigan r
years, that Michigan adopt tt
tory system, would materia
,the length of time that the
'rooms is held uyl would d
'the speed with which the 13
would make the dormitories
ity. "The dormitories are coi
this Action on the part of t
ladies is hastening the move
the erection," said the presid
Though the conditions are
ideal a report from the r
office states that there have
withdrawals from the Unii
Regent Beal stated that, tl
dearth of rooming house pr(
and that the many vacant 1
the city could be leased r
rented to parties in a positic
ter such an arrangement.,
'announcement Mr. Hurley st
he Union would see to it t
houses were located and t
would be listed along with
rooms already on file.
Women Ac-o'mmodate
While Michigan women ar
modated. in the Universi
tories and in authorized he
women there have been sev
stances reported where thi
engaged in the summer mon
re-let to students offering
rent. All students, both n
women, who have experience
conditions will be helped as,
possible by acquainting the U
the facts.
If the student body is indi
sending the reports of case
Hurley no results can be
but if there is a hearty co-
'with the plan results are

)ly

fa(

lty. I equipment for what he is now doing. I advertising manager of The Daily.

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