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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 05, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, 1MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1919.

PRICE

f

Traditional Block "W" Displayed
First A t 1907Pen nsylvania Game

u

E XTRA

PLANNED

HIT;

TRA

With

5;

The origin of the block "M," the
formation of which has become a tra-
dition at the most important of Mich-
igan's home games, dates as far back
as 1907. A thorough examination of
The Daily files throws much light on
its beginning. Michigan's greatest
football rival in 190was Pennsylvania
and the Michigan spirit which backed.
the team, found expresson ip the first.
great block "M.",
First Block "51" in 1907,
In the copy of The Daily for Noy.
6, 1907, the following item is found:
"The committee which was appointed
by the directors of the Athletic associ-
ation to devise a color scheme for the
Pennsylvania game has decided upon
a unique plan. /A. large block "M" has
been laid out in the cheering sections.
Banners yellow on one side and blue
on the other will be on sale. Eery
man in the "M" is expected to hold up
his banner yellow side out when the
yellmaster calls for the "M," and the
rest outside the "M" are to hold up
their banners with blue side out."
Association Sells Banners
In later years the Athletic associa-
tion assumed the sale of the banners,

and many varieties of the block "M"
were tried, but it was found that the
yellow "M" on thg blue field was the!
most popular.
The following description of the
block "M" is/taken from The Michigan
Daily of Nov. 17, 1907:
"Probably no more beautiful feature
was ever seen at a football game than
the block "M" formed by the rooters
in the cheering section. At a signal
from the yellmaster, the black mass
of humanity on the bleacher suddenly
became transformed, as though by 'a
magic touch, into a gigantic "M" out-
lined against a 'background of blue."
Perfect Block Formed in 1916
In 1916 at the Pennsylvania game,
an almost perfect block "M" was form-
ed, being made up of 1,250 blue and
750 yellow banners distributed by the
Athletic association. At the big game
between Michigan and Cornell in 1917,
no block "M" was formed due to the
scarcity of material. for the banners.
This year, however, the bunting manu-
facturers are plentifully supplied and
no trouble would be found in brdering
the necessary amount of banners.

and people gave fre-
se to each one of the six
acts last night in Hill
the whole downstairs
lled by 7:40. Long be-
;ram started, things had
selves into a race to se-
fore they were taken.-
opular number on the
Phil Diamond's "jazz"
tarting out with ensem-
varied its offerings by
ind quartets.
ays Cigar Box Violin
m, who had been scied-
ir alone, gave'a novel ci-
a which was followed by
no trio, made up of
ld, '24M, "Doc" Wright,
dil Diamond, '21 Harry
Jack Gardner, 21, and
'22. They played sax-
s, which were received
vor by the audience.
iner, '22, played the vio-
Uent skill. His classical
re faultlessly rendered,
red a great deal of ap-
pieces" offered a refresh-
.rom the "jazzy" senti-
numbers preceding and
1.
(At Th"ce' n- nc

zunres
furnished
which
. Three
and still
more. Ti

by
the
en-
the
heir

re mostly negro melodies and
ections of bygone times.
y and Company," which was
of George Roderick, '21E,
ght Mirrielees, '20E, gave a
ontlnued on Page Six)
RS BOUGHT
K NEW HOSPITALi

- CONINGSBY DAWSON
L'T lASN WIL
LECTURE TOIGHT
Author of War Books Believes Great
Conflict Has Caused Better.
World Understanding
"RE-MAKING THE WORLD" TO
BE SUBJECT OF HIS SPEECH
/Leut. Coningsby Dawson, who is au-
thor of several novels and war books
and who speaks at 8 o'clock tonight
in Hill auditorium on "Re-making the
World," believes that the Great war
'has resulted in the breakdown of
American provincialism and a better
understanding among nations.
Lieutenant Dawson, who was respon-
.sible for "The Garden 'without Walls,"
"The Raft," and "Slaves of Freedom"
before the war, was commissioned a
lieutenant in the Canadian Field Ar-
tillery at the beginning of the war,
and left for England in 1916. In 1918
Lieutenant Dawson Was commissioned
by the American and British govern-
ments to write the story of the Amer-
ican arny in France. This appear-
ed in his book entitled "Out to Win"
printed under the supervision of the
American Intelligence Bureau in
Dawson Recelyes Special Pass
Lieutenant Dawsonreceived a spe-
c#ij pass front General Pershig'.
al ing every high army official ac-
cessible to him, and he is therefore
quallfie to describe the activitiea of
th American army in France. .
"'The thing that struck me particu-
larly about the Americans," he told a
Daily -reporter yesterday, "was the
vast scale on which the Americans
were planning to go into the war. The
idea of size common t American in-
dustry was employed overseas."
Speaking of the greater understand-
ing that has grown up between all
nations as a result of the war, Lieu-
tenant Dawson said: - "The poor man
has found out that the idle rich can
work just as hard as he can, and the
educated man has discovered the man
who lacked his opportunities often
displayed greater courage.
Europe Regards America More
"As a result of'the relief work, ac-
complished by Americans in. Serbia,
Belgium, and other countries, Euro-a
peans have grown to regar.d America
less as a dollar seeking people and
will never forget he kindnesses to
wards thm.'.''
Ilieuten ant Dawon was born and
educated in England but came to this
country in 1905, where he lived up
to the outbreak of the war. The ti-
tles of his war books are "Khaki
Courage," "Carry On," "Living Bay-
onets,' and "The Glory of the
Trenches.'" *
This is the first of a series of lec-
tures Wo be held under the auspices'
of the Orato.rical association.

ABOLITION OF BLOG "M"
RO u5 S SINDIGN~ftIONI

FOR YABDKSTATED

STUDENTS PROTEST AGAINST
ING AWAY WITH OLD
TRADITION

DO- MANY RESERVATIONS MADE IN
SPITE OF INCLEMENT
WEATHER

Editor, The Michigan Daily: r
Whenever a man, be he a student in
the University or in charge of some
activity of the University, makes a
statement comparing one of Michigan's
most cherished traditions to a three-
ringed circus or to a cheap poster on
a suitcase, it is high-time that those
members of the student body who
herish traditions and wish to see thema
perpetuated, rise up and indicate theiry
indignation in tuch a manner that will
leave no doubt as to their feelings in
regard to such statements.
The block "M" is a Michigan tradi-

Though the campaign for subscrip-
tions to the 1920 Michiganensian was
started in yesterday's unfavorable
weather, fully one quarter as many
books were reserved the first day as
during the whole campaign last year.
Underclassmen have so far resery-
ed Fiore yearbooks than have seniors
and juniors, the idea of startint a
four-volume set of uniformly bound
Miohig.nensians appealing especially
to the first and second year men and
whmen.
Taking adyantage of the opportu-
uity of having their names stamped

SUBSCIPTION CAMPAIGN

Arrangements for a special
wire from Stagg field, Chicago,
to the offices of 'The Michigan
Daily" have been completed, in
making plans for the issuance
of the first Michigan Daily extra
on a football game to be played
outside of Ann Arbor. A full de-
tailed report of the game will be
wired to The Daily and the extra
will be issued ipimediately after
the final whistle at Stagg field.
Megaphone announcements of
the game, play by play will be
made. from The Daily offices,
Saturday afternoon. '
CAMPUS OPINION
FAVORS BLOCK "M11
Hurley Says He Used to Look Forard
to Raising of Yellow and
Blue Flags
STUDENT IN-TEREST WARANTS
ITS RETENTION, SAYS HOGAN
Campus opinon has been aroused
by the advertisement which recently
appeared stating that there would be
no block "M" at the Minnesota game
and by the subsequent verification of
this statement in yesterday's Daily.
In speaking of the abolition of the
"M," George Hurley, general secretary
of the Union, said, "As a student I
used to look forward to sitting in the
cheering section when the block IN1
was to be formed and feein myself
a part of the 'M.' I still have the
flags used at these times in my room,
and they mean a great deal tome.
"N" a Delight to Slee
"As an alumnus Iudelight in seeing
the M' from the South stand. I can
realize the work that is thrown on
'the Athletic association, but I feel they
should grit their teeth and look upon~
the work as a necessary evil."
Carl T. Hogan, '20E, president of
the Union, said, "I tink every effort
should be made to retain the block
'M' at one big game each year. The
demand for it on the part of the stu-
dent body and the interest with which
they look forward to it warrants its
retention. It is one of the most im-
pressive things one sees at Michigan,
and every effort 'should be made to
provide facilities to handle the ex-
tra work falling upon the athletic as-.
sociation.
(Continued on Page Six)
FORMUR FACULTY
MEMBER SUCCUMBS
Prof. Calvin Thomas, for U years
a member of the faculty of Athe Uni-
versity 'f Michigan, died suddenly in
his home in New York city, according
to word just received her,./
'goessor . Thomas, who was born
n, r Lapeer, Mich., in 1854, was grad-
uated from the 'Unversity of Milchigan
in 184 and, received his AM.- from
khi, 'Uver'sity in 1877. Professor
Thomas was instruetor of German
from 1878 to 1881, assistant professor
of- the same snbject from 181 to
1886, and professor of Germanie lan-
guages and literature from 1886 to
1896 in the University,
When Professor Thomas left the
University he accepted a position at
the University of Columbia where he
also served as professor of Germanic
languages and literature.
He was a member of several socie-
ties and the author of many books

and articles," among which are: "A
Practical German Grammar," "Life
and Works of Schiller," "German Lit-
erature," and "Goethe." /Professor
Thomas was' consulting editor of the
New Standard dictionary, for which he
wrote 26 articles on letters of the al-
phabet.

WITHOWAL O
INJuNTION MAYG S,
GOC PNRS DECLARES COURT OR
DER "GRAVE BLUNDER" ,
AND "WRONG"
FUEL ADMINISTRATOR
RETURNS FROM WES'
Will Prepare to Avert Possible In
crease in Price of Anthraite
Coal, Is Delared
(By Associated Press)
Indianapolis, Nov. 4. - Presiden
Lewis, head of the United Mine Work
ers of America, t6nigh stated tha
miners will be willing to resume no
gotiations with the operators imme
diately -if the restralnng order no'r
enforced against them is vacated..
Y'(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 4. - Withdrawa
of the injunction obtained by the gov
ernment will open the way for th
settlemedt of the coal strike, Sam
uel Gompers, president of the fedra:
tion of labor, declared in a statemen
issued here tonight.
"dross Blunder"
Charging that the injunction wasa
grave wrong and a gross blunder, Mr
Gompers said if it were vacated an
the miners and operators were inv'ite
to further conference by the depart
utent of labor bp had an "ablidin
faith" that a mutually honorabl
agreement could be effected, "where
by the coal strike could be brough
to aned."
"Dspitethe spirit of hopefulnesi
firmly believed in by offials at Wash-
'lngton, spokesmen for the miners ant
operators as a whole declared the
country in for a protracted struggle
Fuel Adminstrator Garfield, return.
ing from a trip in the west, took Ac
tive control of the anthracite situa-
tion today, and made ready to fix I
maximum price on anthracite at tho
first evidence of attempts to advauce
th4 price,
Enters Conferenees
Garfield took part in a .number o
conferences during the day 'ut it wa
said officially that he had not discuss
ed the settlement of the strike witi
,the operators,,
Attorney General Palmer in alettol
to a ship builders' council whic
protested .the injunction proceeding
sounded a new iote of hope by do'
(Continued on Page. Six)
BIG GAME TICKET
SALE ENDS NOV. 4
Minnesota game tickets are prati
'cally sold put, according to ann6unce
went of Athletic association. officials
Tuesday' night. All student appla
tions rust be in by Thursday night
Nov. 6.
All applications received at the ath
letic office Wednesday- and Tlursda:
will be limited to three tickets eac
in addition to the student's ttcke
This extra limitation has been mad
necessary by the unusually heavy sale

ersity

completed the
0 acres of land
hospital. The

forth of the west fork of the
varo. This district, portions of
have belonged to the University
ar, is now entirely owned by the
rly the entire block bounded by
3lark Catherine, and Obsbrya,
streets is included in the pur-
as is the land across Catherine
next the present hospital build-
city has ordered the closing of
vatory street from Ann street
and of Catherine street f6om
to Observatory. 'The new hos-
will be built directly across Ob-
.ry street just north of Ann
L,"d will extend into the land,
of bwepy Hollow.
ENT COUNCIL TO DISCUSS
PORTANT I.ATTERS 'fONIGIT
ts meeting this evening the Stu-
council will bring up te fo-
g matters of impQrtanc: gCm-
arran ements for the Fall
I; re-ppoiztment of Student
i repxesgntatives by classes on.
asis of the N ovembex I enroll-
and fnal plans for, the ie.et-
(f all cass officers to be held at
o'occ Thursday evening in the

tion which before this year has never in.gold letters on the front cover of
been attacked. It's fame has spread the books about one-halfot those
all over this country. Wherever one:-
ges. he is asked about the "Human subscribinig have paid up in full at the
M'." Pictures of it have appeared in present time.
every large newspaper in the coun- Sales will' continue throughout the
try, and it probably has caused more rest of the week. In addition to the
favorable comment and directed more stands lready placed on the campus,
inquiries as to Michigan than any oth- students may subscribe from 1 to 5
er one feature of our athletIc exhibi- o'cloek daily in the Michlganenstan,
ions, offes on the' second floor of the Press
Are we to see this venerable tradi- building, and Wlom 7 to 8 o'clock
tion abolished by such petty objections evenings in the. Michigan Union, An
as appeared in The Daily of Nov,4? extra stand will be found on the first'
Because it requires a little more work floor of the Economics building.
on the part of the Athletic association,
which is the servant of the University, BLAZE OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN
is this any reason for doing away with EXTINGUISHED BY CHEMICALS
a'tradition which has stood the test of
years? What is the alumni body going 'A fire of unknown origin at the res-
to say when they learn that their'A
cherished block "M" has been abolish- idence of Herman. Pipp, 710 Arch
ed because it resembles a three-ring street, was discovered about 6:15
circus and the Athletic association Tuesday morning. The fire, which
has not the time or the inclination to started in a closet, was extinguished
bother with it? with chemicals 'by the Arn Arbor. Fire,
(Continued on P'age Five) Department.
SPECIAL PRACTICALLY ASSURl'4

1'
I

A special train, leaving Ann Arbor
at 10:30 of'clock Friday night and
arriving in Chicago at 7 o'clock Sat-.f
'urday morning, is practicaily assured
although only about two. Pullmans
have been reserved to date. Michigan
Central officials state that they ex-
pect at least 30Q students to go on the
special Friday night, besides a large
number who will leave on earlier
trains.
tExodus Starts
,Already the exodus to Chicago has
started, some of the Chicago students
eaving left for their homes Tuesday
night, and others 'will go today. Most

of. the meA Ore going on the train,
the inclement weather and bad roAds
preventing many from driying..
To guarantee that a special will be
sent to Chicago, it will be iecessaty
f" studentsa, who plan to make the
trip, to make reservations immedi-,
ately.. Otherwise ufticent accomm6-
datlons will not be provided. Approx-
imately 500 students will go to Chi-
cago, according to M. C, officials.
Many of these men are being sent
by raffles conducted by fraternities,
drug stores, and billiard rooms.
A large number of men expect to
/ (Continued on Page Six).

NO EXTRA 'ENSIAN COPIES

J

The edition of the Michiganen-
enslan to be published this year-
will be only sufficient to cover
the advance subscribtions re-
ceived., Persons wishing to ob-
tain the Michiganensian will
tberefore be requested to ,sub-
scribe in advance, as there will
be no extra copies for sale.
Board in Control of Student
Publications,
E. R. SUNDERLAND,
Business Manager.

...
.. .. .-

'

NOTICE

UBSCRIBERS

0

,1,

J

Your unpaid subscription is now due. Present rate $3.50
$4.00 on Subscriptions .not paid by November eight

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