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October 21, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-21

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

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MATURE YANKEE
fIiPATION IN
WPE IS DENE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1919.

1
PRIOR,

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I

LAWS WUIL HOI
SMOKER AT UNION

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I

S AT WASHINGTON
E TO TAKE PART IN
COMMISSIONS '-

RE-

The annual All-Law smoker will be
held at'7:30 o'clock Thursday evening
at the" Michigan Union. Dean Henry
M. Bates will be the main speaker for
the occasion.
It is hoped that all freshmen will
avail themselves of this opportunity
to meet the faculty and one another,
as well as the upperclassmen.
,"Sandy" Wilson's orchestra has been
secured to provide, the requisite
amount of "jazz" and several other
campus entertainers will be present.
Cider and doughnuts will be servied
as well as smokes.

SENATE ACTION MUST
BE HAD FIRST, ISSAID
Americans Will Not Enter Again
Upon Foreign Matters' Until
Treaty, Is Ratified
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 20.-Taking notice
of reports that. the - United States
mnight aid in carrying out provision of
the peace treaty in advance of the
treaties ratification by the senate, the
admiistration announced today that
American diplomatic and military par-
ti4lpation in certain of these provisions
must wait until the senate has acted.
Senate Action Necessary
At the state department it was de-
clared .this government would not ac-
cept the invitation of the supreme
eounell at Versailles to take a place
nimediately on the international con-.
nissions set up by the treaty and at
he war department it was made clear

FERRY FIELD PEP~
MEET ABANDONED
FOR OHIO GAME

COACH YOST FAVORS CHANGE
FOR HILL AUDITORIUM
ASSEMBLY
FRIDAY SET AS DATE
FOR BIG GATHERING
0. S. U. Makes Plans for Huge Sta-
dent Backing Here kext
Saturday

FRIDAY FORESEES
CON FERE~NCE GOOD

Prof. David Friday of the economics
department, returned Sunday from
Washington, D. C., where he has been
attending the labor conference.
He 'declaresathat a fine spirit of
optimism prevails at the,* meeting.
Pr minent capitalists rub shoulders
with the labor representatives, John
D. Rockefeller with, Samuel Gompers.
A real desire to co-operate seems to be
evidenced in the way that the opposing
sides debate with one another through
a period of many days.
"It 'will indeed be surprising if
some good does not come from the
conference," states Professor Friday.
WILL O' 0PEI S T R'I'KE
CONFERENCE, TQDAY,
Operators of Coal Mines Declare They
Won't Yield to femands of
Men
SECRETARY OF LABOR WILSON
HOPEFUL FOR SETTLEMENT

I d,

Pittsburg Lawyer Tells of Intrigues
and Admits Being Advocate
of Anarchy
DAZES SOLONS WITH CALM e
EXPOSITION OF ACTIVITIES
(By Associated, Press)
Washington, Oct. 20.-While mem-
bers of the senate labor committee in-
vestigating the steel strike] sat* fairly
dazed and dumbfopnded, Jacob Mar-
golisj of Pittsburg, I. W. W. attor-
ney and admitted advocate of social

American troops would

UNIVER5ITY WELCOMES MERCIER1
HONORARlY LLUIDEGREE CONFERRE[
,uPON VISITING BELSIAN PREL

be

ed without senate sanction, to po- revolution today told them a- story of
:e districts in which the treaty pro- ultra radical activities which he said
des for plebicites under the military underly and were associated with the
pervision at the great powers. nation wide strike of steel workers.
Tlw two announcements were made Hints at Revolution
wultaneously and generally were Even more.remarkable to his hear-
,cepted in the senate, where the pos- ers was the Pittsburg attorney, delin-
bility of premature' American partic- eation of a partially successful attenpt
ation in the treaty has been one of covering the past two years to fuse
e storm centers of criticism as at Pittsburg, for an unstated but
nounting to an administration de-c- vaguely hinted revolutionary purpose
ration -gf policy on the subject. the combined forces of the industrial
Will Hasten Vote workers of the world, Bolshevik and
Senators on both sides of the treaty Russian $ndustrial workers whose
rnroversy expressed the opinion pri- imagination he acknowledged had
tely tonight that the administra- been caught by the successors of
fn's stand would aid in hastening the Lenine and Trotzky in Russia. All
ial roll (call on ratification. were working he told the committee
A resolution on this subject and one, calmly, "to create a new society with-
niting American paiticipation in the , in the shell of the old."
rous diplomatic commisson to be. Margolis coolly classified himself as
eated are in preparation, although it an "anarchist syndicalist" in which
understood that there has been no capacity he had worked with the I.
mplete agreement regarding either W. W. organization and a "Tolstoian
iong the senate majority. anarchist."
One effect of the state department's Say Governments No Use -

The open air mass meeting planned
for Wednesday afternoon at Ferry
field has been cancelled in favor of
'another to be held in Hill auditorium,
Friday night.
Arrangements which were under
way for the pep gathering Friday
night, according to information from
the Student council, were considered
by Coach Yost as more favorable to
the cause, 'and he suggested that the
meeting Wednesday be cancelled.
Speakers Not Chosen
It has been announced that plans
are already being materialized for a
rousing affair Friday night, in pre-
paration for the battle Saturday at
Ferry field' with the 0. S. U. football
team. Although speakers for the af-
fair have not yet been chosen, it is
understood that the program will be
somewhat similar to the one held
Traditions Day with the exception
that the foremost feature of the eve-
ning will be the impending clash with
the Buckeyes.
Secret Practice In Order
Coach Yost has arrived at the con-
clusion that the more practice his
team will get this week, the better
his. chances. will be for a victory.A
miss meeting on Ferry field in the
afternoon might interfere with this
programtt is thought, in that it would
destroy the object of he coach's sec-
ret practices this week.
The affair Friday evening is being
looked upon as far more advantageous
to the cause. Fresh from a rousing
pep meeting -the night before, the stu-
dents of the University should be in
condition to give the Varsity the prop-
er amount of moral backing during
the contest.
Big Game For Buckeyes
Rumblings from the camp of the
Buckeyes has it that they consider
this contest the most important one of
their schedule. Word from the Ath-
letic association says that hundreds
and maybe thousands of Scarlet and
Grey rooters will accompany them to
Ann Arbor for the contest.
The pep meeting Friday night was
therefore called by the Student coun-
cil to meet the demands of the times.-

J..

(By Associated Press)
t Washington, Oct. 20.-On the eve of
a conference called by the SoCretary
of Labor in the hope of averting the
strike of 500,000 bituminous coal min-.
ers st for Nov. 1, John L. Lewis,
president of the United Mine Workers
of America, announced tonight that
the strike order would not be rescind-
ed unless operators met all demands
including the five day week.
Operators Stand Firm;
Unless the strike order is with--
drawn the operators will not enter in-
to negotiations looking to an adjust-
ment of the difference according to
Thomas Brewster, head of the coal
operators committee.
The conference tomorrow will be'
attended by Secretary Wilson and the
full scale committee representing:
miners and operators, each committee
comprising 32 members, but t'ie gen-
eral view of each group was that
nothing would conie of the meeting.
Wilson Stilr HJopeful
Secretary Wilson, acting as govern-
ment mediator, still was hopeful to-
night, however, that the faction would
get together and not plunge the coun-
try into a strike at, the beginning of
winter with not more than a month's
stock of coal on h'and.
Shell Floats On
Waves Of Huron
Rafts, punts; rowboats, canoes, and
accasionally sail-boats and motor
boats have plied the Huron for years,
but Sunday morning its sleep was
broken by the mighty strokes of eight
lusty oarsmen who pulled the first
eight-oared shell that has ever floated
.on the river up the waters of Argo

UNION CALSATTENTION
TO RV1LING ON WOMEN

CARDINAL CHUE'"ED
So high did enthusiasm run-for
the Uniiversity's distinguished
visitor yesterday that Cardinal
Mercier had a chance to witness
Michigan student pep before
.leaving. As hi car was stand-
ing on William street, he appear-
ed upon the platform in response
to the throng that packed both
streets about his car. Upon his
appearance hats were doffed and
the yell went up: "Yea, Cardin-
al; yea, Cardinal; yea, Cardinal.
Fight 'em, fighi-'em, fight 'em!"
'The venerable prelate appeared
Immensely pleased at this out-
burst of student enthusiasm.

k'

DESIRE TO
"MAN'S
TO

MAKE< NEW EDIPICE
BUIINtP LEADS
I NFORCEMENT

announcement was to set at rest re-
ports that President Wilson might dis-
regard the advice of the foreign com-
inittee and name an America to act
nofflieally on the powerful repara-
tions commission. The other great
powers are said to be very anxious
that the United States have full rep-
resentation from the start on this and
several other commissions that are to
be organized.
Progress Made
Real progress toward senate action
on the treaty was made today when
the leaders put at effectual damper
'on debate and permitted the senate
clerks to finish the tedious work of
reading: the treaty text. Just before
adjournment the Johnson amendment
to equalize voting powers In the,
league assembly was formally brought
up for action and it will have the floor
except for the privileged "morning
hour" each day until it is disposed of.
It is the last but one of the commit-
tee. amendments.
SOLDIERS - OBJECT
TO GERMAN OPERA
New York, Oct. 20.-Mounted police
tonight charged a crowd of 300 service
men who had massed in front of the
jexington theater to prevent produc-
tion g fa German opera upon -which
*}ayor Eylan§ had placed an o licial
Dispersed by the police the service
per, hastened to Times square, re-
pruited nearly 1,000 civilians, arid re-
turned to the theater. One section of
h1e 11'V engaged in a fight withl the
police, laying dowrNa barrage of
'Orlicks and stontes. I
University's Official Colors Displayed
Secretary Shirley Smith has placed:
on display in Wahr's bookstore win-
dow on State street samples of the
true maize and blue colors, adopted
by the Regents and students years ego
5pd thi$ week reaffirmed as the offi-
al polors' of the University by this

Governments he said will be of no
use when "proper industrial' condi-
tions are established," he put in and
these industrial conditions will be es-
tablished when workers organized
along I. W. W. lines got ready to "take
over and operate industry for them-
selves more efficiently than private
ownership can.
"The I. W. W. and the Russian Bol--
shevik endorsed and assisted in the
steel strike," he said, in response to.
a question by Senator Kenyon. He
explained likewise that the American
Federation of Labor was 'too narrow"
and "too lacking in vision" to accom-
-plish real progress for the workers.
Comedy Club Will
Adopt New Rules
One dramatic program every month
and visits from the more famous act-
ors who happen to come in the vicin-
ity of Ann Arbor, is the. new feature
which the Comedy club is planning for.
the ensuing year. This is expected to
draw out the best dramatic talent on
the campus aid acquaint the members
with rrofessional artists. Talks by
faculty men who afe interested in the
worlk will alo be givep. -
New aaiendmnents to the by-laws of
the constitution of the club will make
it necessary for all members to at-
tend the monthly meetings regularly
unless they wish to relinquish their
membership. This step was taken in
view of the faet that attention to dra-
matic actiyities must be one qualifica-
tion for membership. There are many
able students desiring to get in, and
people no longer interested will not
be retained to hamper the activity.
Richard Forsyth, manager, and Jo-
seph Avery, president, have called a
meeting for Tuesday, Oct. 28, at 4
o'clock, in the auditorium of Univer-
sity hall. It is imperative that all
memebrs be present at that time. A
meeting of new members has already
been held and partial plans for the
first meeting in November made.

Women will not be permitted in the
Union after the completion of the
building, except as lheiguests or rela-
tives of members or at certain hours
of the day when members can take
them through. Even when guests or
relatives of members, the women must
use the women's entrance at the side
of the Union.-
As soon as the main door is com-
pleted so as to allow a doorkeeper to.
be stationed there, a man for the pos-
ition will' be selected, and he will ad-
mit only members at that entrance.
This ruling is not a recent one, having;
been a house rule for some time.
"U" Women Not Violators
Lately a great number, of women
havevisited the building at all ti-nes,
and the number of women in the
building, especially last Sunday, caus-
ed the officials to call the public s
attention to the rube. Union officials.
state that it is not the University wom-
en who are'the violators of the rule;
but persons who are in no way con-
nected with the University.
The purpose of the rule'is to make
the Union a man's building, just as
the women have Barbour gymnasium
and Newberry hall. Probably the
house committee will set aside a cer- 1
taro hour of then' day, in the morning,
when members of the Union may show
the building to women friends.
Tap Service ?Also Closed
Women vill be allowed'in the tap
room only between 11 and 12 o'Aock
on Friday and Saturday nights, but at
all other times they will be, refused
service. Owing to the unfinished con-
dition of the building, the Union has
neglected to observe the rule, but of-
ficials state that it will be vigorously I
enforced in the future.
DANCE TO FOLLOW
CHICAGOCONTEST
Members of the Michigan Union
Who accompany the Varsity to Chicago

ANN ARBOR PUBLIC FILLS A
TORIUM TO HEAR SHORT
ADDRESS
TIES BETWEEN NATI(
INCREASE IN STRENG
Dean Effinge' Presides in Absen
President; Faculty Present
in Cap and Gown-
Before an audience that, long b
the re'quired time, had taken al
available seating space in Hill
ditorium and then filled the aisles
eminence, Cardinal Mercier, Be.
prelate renowned for his ; cou
against the invaders of his stri
country during ,the Great War, m
his promised Ann Arbor appeat
at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon.
In the presence of townspeople
student body, and faculty clad n'
robes, the 'U\nversity conferred
highest honor upon the Cardinal
stowing upon him the honorary de
of doctor of -laws.
Clergy' Present
Led by Prof. H. C. Sadler and ]
John R. Ef nger the venerable ch
man took his seat upon the plat
by members $f the clergy from De
and Ann Arbor. In the absenc
Pre:ident Harry B. Hutchins, awa
.uiness in the east, Dean Ef*
presentcd th'e speaker with his de
SExtezding -to him the greeting
the University, the dean said in
"The University is deeply honore
Oe appearance of Cardinal Me
We" shall e3^-forgeth t ^
has been graced 1yy his presence.
loving token for all that this j
man has done for the sake of hub
ity., the University desires to besto-
highest honor upon the prelate,
ferring upon him. the degree of d
of laws."
Cardinal Exteds Thanks
In aiswer Cardinal 'Mercier said
am deeply thankful to the Unive
of Michigan for its invitation' to
here. I am only sorry. that1I
but a moment to spend. I like to c
here. Upon leaving Belgium on
my first ideas was to bring a t
of 'appreciation from my own bel<
university of Louvain to 'the man
'America. When i recall the dest
tion by the invaders of my own
versity, I secure great satisfactio
visiting any sister institution.
"In conferrng this degree upon
there has been created a new tie
tween our university and yours,
tween our country and yours, Bel
and America."
Speaks to Young Men
Taking as his theme the fosterinm
higher ideals among the young me
America, the prelate said: "To
young men of this University I
a special and fatherly sympathya
desire to give them a word .of cou
and affection. Yod have seen durin
last few years this University bec
the center of patriotism, a place w:
the public opinion of America
molded and prepared. Above all
have seen the laws' of seilf-sar
and self-denial called into effect.'
The Cardinal continued, speakin

100.1HIG SCHOOLS TO'
JOIN DEBATING LEAGUE
LOVING CUPS WILL BE AWARDED
TO WINNING TEAMS IN
CONTEST
One hundred Michigan high schools
will take part in the state champion-
ship debate series conducted this year
under /the auspices of the extension
division of the University, Mr. R. K.
Immel stated Monday. Already 87
schools have been entered.
Mlitary Training Subject
The question for debate this year is
compulsory military training. Each
school will take part in three debates
to decide group championships.. Four
district championships -will be settled,
then two will Ae chosen to come to
/Ann Arbor in May to debate for the
state championship.
Departments Co-Operate
As trophies for the teams taking'
first and second in the. state debates,
the Oratorical association of the Uni-
versity will give loving cups.
The oratory department and the li-
,brary extension service co-operate
with the extension division in con-
ducting the contests, affording mate-
rial and reference.
Nebraska Commercial School Grows
.The school of commerce and busi-
'ness administration at Nebraska shows
-a marked increase. The enrollment
,in 1913 in the school of commerce was
40, while now it is 200.

pond.
This boat was sent up by the Detroit
Boat tclub to give 20 of its members
who are enrolled at the Unuiversity a
chance to practice at the sport.
Present a'ccommodations for the
craft are poor, for the ice houses on
the west shore of the river above the
small dam were the only places large
enough to house its 65 foot length.
There is no float from which to
launch the boat and the oarsmen have
to walk out iito the waters with their
burden. Aregular float will be pro-'
vided soon.'+
The courses up Argo pond offers
about a mile of navigable water but if
the sport increases in popularity and
is taken up by the University, as it
is hoped it will, an ideal course of
nearly two miles could be provided for
on Barton pond above the big dam.
CLASSICAL CLUB TO' HOLD
RECEPTION FOR MEMBERS
All new memebrs of the Classical
club are expected to be present at a
reception to be given for members at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 318 on
the third floor of the Union.
As the list of names of applicants
for admission, to the club' contains
many with which the membership
committee is unfamiliar, the process
of selecting them is a slow one.t As
the result the present list of accept-
ed members does not include all those,
who will be admitted during the course
of the semester.

have been invited to attend a dance of Belgium's resistance to a man again
the Reynolds club at the 'University of the invaders' proposal of travelli
Chicago to be held Saturday night, through their country free. and u
Nov. 8. All that is asked of the vis- harmed.
itors is that they show their Michigan In closing his eminence said: "Th
Union membership cards, and they war has proved that the worship.
will then be accorded every hospital-' freedom shall continue; the worship
ity of the building. justice, of truth; in short, of Go'd
The best orchestra in Chicago, play- mighty."
ing the latest and best "jazz" music . : Dieterl 'Sings
is engaged far the occasion, accord- The short exercises were conclud
ing to Fred A. Helmquist, secretary of by the singing of the "Battle Hymn
the club, who extended the invitation the Republic," by Robert Dieterle, t
to Michigan students through Homer audience under the direction of Pr
Heath, general manager of the Union. A. A. Stanley joiriing in the singi
The Reynolds club at Chicago is the of the chorus.
corresponding organization "to the The aged prelate left in a priva
Union here. Its home is directly op- car for Detroit immediately after t
posite Bartlett gymnasium and Stagg exercises, accompanied by high o
field. ficials and a special cordon of betr
policemen all of whom formed his e
. Iowa Grad School Enrolls Many cort out here. The add'ress.'at A
The graduate school enrollment of Arbor yesterday was the fifth duri
}Iowa State university is increasing the day for the Cardinal, and he w
yearly. This year the number entered to address' a sixth audience in I
is about 100. troit last night.

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