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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 18, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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UaUA
New Department Head Likes Research
Opportunities Offered by
University
DR. CABOT COME WITH 20
YEARS OF WIDE EXPERIENCE
Dr. Hugh Cabot, who is to head the
Surgery department of the University
Medical school, believes Michigan's
future along this line holds unbounded
possibilities. "I see no reason why this
should not become one of the greatest,
and perhaps the greatest, center of
surgery in this country or in the
world.
"This possibility will be enormously
increased with the building of the new
State hospital, foundations for which
are now being laid next to the site of
the present hospital. With a capacity
of 1,000 beds and with nearly half of
the building taken up with laborato-
ries and teaching rooms, there will be
a wonderful opportunity to accom-
plish much in surgical research."
Has War Record
Dr. Cabot has been i the field of
surgery for over twenty years. He
comes to the University from the Mas-
sachusetts General hospital at Boston,
of which he was surgical chief. He
was also one of three surgical chiefs
at Harvard University.
Early in 1916 Dr, Cabot, accompanied
by a large portion of his staff, offered
his services to the British government
and entered the British hospital serv-
ice. He was given the title of lieu-
tenant-colonel, which he still holds,
according to British Army regulations,
and placed in charge of what was
known as Harvard unit, General hos-
pital No. 22, located at Etaples, France.
This of course, applied to the surgical
work, as the British government ap-
pointed an officer there , known as
"officer commanding." However, in
1917, Dr. Cabot was made "officer com-
manding," something very rarely done,
for it then threw additional respon-
sibility upon him. He was not alone
responsible for the work of the hos-
pital but was subject to line duty as
well should his services be required on
toe field at any time. Thisis in con-
trast to the American army, wher
staff officers are not subject to line
duty at the same time.
Fifth Army Suffered
General Hospital No. 22 was one of
the large evacuation hospitals on the
lines of communication, located be-
hind the Fifth army.
When the big "show" in which the
Fifth army played so big a part, oc-
curred from March 21 to Aprils, 1918,
and during the Lys offensives of the
Germans, from April 9 to the 27, there
were over 250,000 casualties in the
Fifth army alone.
Commenting on war surgery, Dr.
Cabot expressed his opinion that noth-
ing really advantageous to the surgical
profession has been gained through
the experience of war. Explaining
this, he says that the main reason
for this is the difference between the
wounds of war and the wounds of
accident in civil life. They are so
much different that they can. hardly
be compared.
He said, however, that great ad-
vances were made in war surgery, and
should another war come, it would
find a wonderful efficiency in handling
these cases.
Looks for Progress,
"I believe," said Dr. Cabot, "thatthe
head of a surgical department like
this should live from one to- three
years in the future, to anticipate the
height to which surgery may aspire.
Surely here, with the unity of a State

hospital, behind which the State legis-
lature stands, wonderful progress
should be made in this field. The op-
portunity of the State University is a
large one and I believe is going to
accomplish more in education than the
endowed university ever can. It has
the confidence on$ unity of support
necessary to progress."
Frosh Contribute
To Haberdashers
The number of freshman "pots" sold
in Ann Arbor up to the present time is
estimatedtoberbetween 1,700 and
2,000. The average price for which
these are sold is 75 cents. The fresh-
man class has paid a price of $1500
then for these unpretentious "pots."
The coming cold weather is due to
squeeze a similar, or if anything, a
larger amount from the toddling class
when the change to toques becomes
necessary. Last year because of the
obsession for brown felt there was
small demand for the gray flannel
"pot" or the knitted toque. This sea-
son, however, popularity once more
dwells with the combination of badge
aIi 1c.daaZ

THE MAJESTIC
"A Rough Riding Romance," pro-
duced by William Fox and featuring
Tom Mix, will be shown at the Majes-
tic again to-day. Additional offerings
include a travelogue, a screen supple-
ment, and a Sennett Comedy.
Mary Pickford in "The Hoodlum,"
one of her latest releases, proves
again that besides having a captivat-
\ing, personality she is an actress, of
talent. The story concerns a girl liv-
ing with her rich grand father who
casts aside wealth and luxury to go
to her father, a poor writer.
AT THE ARCADE
The Arcade will present a return
engagement of Alice Brady in "Red-
head" today. As usual Miss Brady is
right there iwith her customary pep
and sparkling personality, which em'-
anate from all her work. She is ably
supported by Conrad Nagel, also lead-
ing man in her stage play, "Forever
After" who plays opposite her in this
picture.
STUDENTS ILL 0BOOST1# I
CAM~lPUS WILL, PARTICIPATE IN
COUNTY DRIVE FOR
$8,500.00 QUOTA
student and faculty members of the
University will be asked to contribute
to a permanent national memorial to
Theodore Roosevelt next Thursday
and Friday during the drive for
Washtenaw county's quota. Special
booths will be set up -on the campus,
and it is expected that the University
will give liberally toward the $3,500
County goal.
The total national fund is to be $5,-
000,000, part of swhich will be used
to erect a . suitable monument i
Washington, and part to purchase the
Roo'evelt home' at Oyster bay and
maintain it as a national memorial
similar to Mount Vernon. The re-
mainder of the fund will be used for
Americanization purposes.
,To Found Scholarships
Because it is' felt -that no stone or
marble could commemorate complete-
ly Roosevelt's ideals and his services
to the nation, the national counil de-
cided that some permanent foundation
should be established to realize .the
projects which the dead president
hoped to see established during his
lieftime. For this reason, it is the
opinion of the state headquarters at
Detroit that a large part of theme-
morial fund will be used to endow
scholarships and chairs for the teach-
ing of that Americanism which char-
acterized Roosevelt's whole public
life.
Drive Ends October 27
The national 'drive will open Oct.
20 and continue for one week, ending
on the birthday anniversary of Pres-
ident Roosevelt. The plan, according
to Paul ii. King of Detroit, state
chairman of the memorial committee,
is to secure the fund as far s possi-
ble from a great number ot' small
contributions. A special school chil-
dren's day has been set aside for
Monday, Oct. 27, when special exer-
cises will be held and buttons issued
to pupils who contribute. Every con-
tributor to the national fund will be
enrolled as a member of the Roose-
vent Memorial association. -
Hog Brings Record Price of $10,000.00
Hannibal, Mo., Oct 17.- An 1,100-
pound hog, raised by Louis Harrison,

has been auctioned for' $10,000 here..
This is said to be a record price in
this state. The animal is 44 inches
high, 84, inches long, and is 4 years
old. L. C. Potter of Plattsburg pur-
chased the animal.

. . ULlIVE A- CHINA' II t

London, Oct. 17.-London has
for months without thunedrstc
HUBER Greatest Music
DFTRfl I " THE ROSE (

JI "1

MAJESTIC
LAST TIMES TODAY
Tom Mix
Rough Riding
Romance
ARCADE
Shows at 3:00; 7:00; 8:3o
Phones:
Theatre, a6-M Mgr's Res., 2316-M
Sat. 18-Alice Brady in "Redhead" (Ret.)
(Instead of "His Majesty," The -Amer-
ican"); Outing-Chester Scenic and
Comedy.
Sun..-Mon. - Tues. 19-20-21 - Geraldine
Farrar in "Tihe World and its Woman";
Christie Comedy, "He Who Hesitates,"
and Jazz Monologue.

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