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October 18, 1919 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rep 1

Unmversity Stana kaedu
"There is no question many unreas-
onable room charges have been made,
MAKES and the University is right in doing
what it can to check this.
"It should be remembered, however,
that some increase is justifiable simply
11, when in view of the drop in the value of
wants a money. Higher taxes, higher utility
>dy fired rates, doubled coal prices, more to pay
k, for laundry, all are legitimate excuses
>f Ernest for a reasonable increase. Moreover,
ker, tire some places where extra help is neces-
n Arbor, sary now have to pay 40 to 50 cents
s of his an hour for-it as compared to 20 to 25
n, whose cents formerly.
e -city is "We must keep in mind also that the
o divides present great demand for rooms has
k at his brought many people to take students
Layoralty who have never done it before, and
mber of who were- induced to do it merely be-
rbor and causes the chances for good profit
y, culled were higher than before. When so
ervation, great a crowd of students "swoops
down" on a city as did this year, the
extra rooming service naturally has
overalls to be paid for.
.t him an Some Prices Justified
liabilitk, "Furthermore, not a little of this
gon shaft talk of high prices comes from stud-
present,. ents who, unwilling to live in a modest
way, searched for rooms above the
he said. average in accommodations and natur-
tis year, ally had to pay for it."
doing, I Mayor Wurster expressed his satis-
right in faction at the way in which the old
"town and gown" antagonism has
is way is gradually melted away until an excel-
s passed. lent good will exists between the city
seas and and University populations.

PILOT, STUDENT

EX-AVIATOR MEETS
MONARCH WHILE
TOLEDO

BELGIAN
IN

Fully a year after he had made the
friendship of King Albert of the Bel-
gians by piloting him over the German
lines in an airplane, Olver H. Hall,
'23E, recently dscharged from the air
service, met the monarch in Toledo
recently and was received with a
hearty handshake in remembrance of
the experience the two had gone
through together.
Never forgetful of his friends, the
king kept his special train waiting
when he saw his former pilot in the
crowd. Hall was introduced to the
queen, who addresesd him, in perfect
English. The king speaks very brok-
enly, having acquired all his English
since the occasion of his trip with the
American aviator.
American Honored
Hall, who was one of two surviving
American officers with a British squad-
ron, in Belgium, was stationed at an
airdroce in that part of the country
which escaped Gelman invasion. King
Albert and his court had taken up
their residence nearby, so close that
the two little princes used to make the
airdrome a playground. One morning
when the weather was unusually bad,
the King decided that he would see
some of the damage the Germans had
done to his country. As a courtesy,
the American member of the squadron
was given the honor of piloting the
royal passenger.
Lacked Coat
Albert, who is very tall, had not
brought a warm enough coat for the
cold of the upper air. He was finally
encased in a fur-lined "monkey-coat,"
so small that it hardly came to his
knees.
Heading for the German lines, Hall
rose to a height of 15,000 feet in 15
minutes.. German "archie" shells
burst around them, but the King paid
no attention to the danger as he sadly
viewed the devastated country below.
After more than an hour, a safe de-
scent was made at the airdrome and
it was found that Albert's hands were
frozen so that they were useless for
a time. He is a great handshaker,
according to Hall, and was annoyed
when unable to clasp ie hands of the
American flyers.

Pennsylvania.-The board of trus-
tees of the University of Pennsylvania
at a recent meeting registered their
approval of a plan to erect a combina-
tion dormitory for women and a
nurses' home. It will be a part of the
university group of buildings, on a site
yet to be decided upon.
Wisconsin.-Due to the unprece-
dented enrollment at the University of
Wisconsin classes are now being held
during the noon hour. This increases
the university's teaching day from
eight to nine class hours.
Kentucky.--Matriculation at the Uni-
versity of Kentucky exceeds all former
records. Reports show that 1014 have
registered. There is a total of 372
students in the college of science and
warts.
Indiana.-A memorial masque for
the soldiers of the University of In-
diana killed in the war was read by
Mr. William Chauncy Langdon at a
gathering of the faculty and students
Tuesday afternoon. This masque had
originally been prepared for the Mem-
orial Day celebration at Beaune,
France, May 30, 1918.

Nunnally's
Candy
Maynard St.

Lunches

Jackson JLimit
a. mi., and ever
presses make loc
Local Cars Ea
m. and every tw
p. m To Ypsil
a.~ m. cyn a.I

12 .2

T-

Trubey's

t

Dinners. Lunches Col
TCe Cream, Delicioi
We Make our own C
Orders solicited from Frat
Sororities. 218 S. Main

infectl
SSO(

Whitney Theat
MONDAY OCTOBER, 20th

.lusic Notes

uistrieg naturally lost
g back to their stud-
are about all back in

Read the Michigan Daily for Campus
news.-Adv.

11 Remedies in Ann Arbor*
may be obtained at
J'S REXALL DRUG STORE

Kenneth Westerman, formerly of
the School of Yusic, has been sent to
Camp Zachary Taylor by the Commis-
sion on Training camp activities to
.ake charge of the music of the First
division.
It is the plan of the war plane divi-
sion to have one musical director for
~ach of its regular army divisions, un-
der whose direction band schools, for
supplying men to the division bands,
a division orchestra, a division band,
voice schools for command giving, and
all voice and instrumental music, will
be organized.
Mr. Westerman spent over a year at
Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas, in
charge of the music of the 32nd Divis-
ion, 7th Division, Artillery of the 5th
Division and Replacement Troops. Af-
ter the signing of x the armistice, he
was transferred to Camp Merritt, N.
J., to handle the musical entertain-
ment work for the returning troops.
Since then he has been at Camp Cus-
ter for the return of the 32nd and has
made a musical survey of the music
in the forts and posts around New
York Harbor.

wT

-ASI
HERJ

AIN ST.

Next door to Krosge's

QUALITY in everything pertaining to modern
adising. We specialize in Rexal Products and
share of your patronage.
REXALL DRUG STORE

BY COSMO HAMIL1
FIRST A HIT-NOW A
After a Triumphant Record-Bre
HSAT THE
7 ES MOTH . GARRICK
PRICES, .75 to $2.00

ra

ncert

S

ri

Hill

AUSPICES OF THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Auditorium---Ainn Arbor---1919---1920

Five

World

Reno

ttractions

Nov. 6-ALLESANDRO BONCI
Celebrated Italian opera star and singer of songs, as-
sisted by ELEANOR BROCK, distinguished Amer-
ican Soprano.{
Dec. 15-NEW YORK CHAMBER,
MUSIC SOCIETY
CAROLYN BEEBE, Pianist and Director. Elev-
en famous musicians in a program of soli, duets, trios
and other ensemble numbers, involving violins, viola,
double bass, bassoon, clarinet, flute, etc.
Jan. 23-MISCHA LEVITSKI
Russian Pianist, who ranks among the world's lead-
ing virtuosos.

Feb. 28-CAROLINA LAZZA]
Prima Donna Contralto of the Metropol
Company, late of the Chicago Opera Comr
artist who possesses art, poise, intelligence
desirable qualities, to a degree which has
universally popular.

April I-TRIO DE LUTECE
A renowned ensemble combination which always de-
lights its hearers, consisting of GEORGE BAR-
RERE, Flutist; CARLOS SALZEDO, Harpist;
and PAUL KEFER, 'Cellist, in a brilliant program
of soli, duets, and trios.

MAIL ORDERS for course tickets at $3.50, $3.00, $2.50, $2.00 will be filled in the
order of receipt and will be sent out about November 1.
PUBLIC SALE of all tickets not ordered by mail, Hill Auditorium Box Qifice,
Saturday, October 25, 8 to 12; thereafter at School of Music.
Address orders to -Charles A. Sink, Seicretary, University School of Music, Ann
Arbor, Michigan.

,DRO BONCI

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