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June 02, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

f

_t

the Univer-

PRESS
ed to the use for
it or not otherwise
shed therein.
dichigan, as second
.rd street.

'he Daily at the
The Daiy office.
ation. N o man-
s postage.
sentiments ex-
dafter 8 o'clock

T

...HARRY M. CAREY
.A. Bernstein
*ug Hitchcock
Renaud Sherwood.
H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
. ., ..Brewster Campb~ell
... ..... JohnI. Dakin
.Robert C. Angell
Marguerite Clark
omas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Winefred Biethan
y Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Prances Oberholtzer
Edna Apel
1~. P. Loveoy
Charles Murchison
Russell Fletcher

tRe strongest evidences in the country of the bonds
which hold graduates faithful to the University and
bring them together, wherever they may be, in the
good-fellowship of old. In the final issue of .this
year, however, there is a discordant note, a few par-
agraphs of' disappointment which cannot be con-
cealed, growing out of the unfortunate withdrawal
of Michigan's entry in the eastern intercollegiates.
The article follows:
"Owing to the Western Conference track meet
coming one week after the Eastern Intercollegiates,
scheduled for Franklin field on May 29, and owing
also to injuries to Capt. Carl Johnson and two oth-
er Wolverine stars, Michigan for the first time in
many years, will not compete this spring at Phil-
adelphia in the country's track classic.
"The news comes as a severe disappointment to
Michigan's alumni and friends in the east. Admit-
ting that the Westemn Conference is giving Mich-
igan all the competition it can take care of, never-
theless, participation in the Eastern Intercollegiate
has each year brought the Maize and Blue into the
eastern limelight, and her showing has always in-
deed been a creditable one.
'We still hope that the powers that be at Ann
Arbor will change their minds and permit the track
team to take the trip they have worked for and once
again show ,the east the stff we know them to be
made of."
It is now too late to remedy what has been done
in this matter. It may even be too late, as Coach
Lundgren has intimated, to arrange a champion-
ship contest with the baseball leaders of the east,
though no.steps toward this end should be left un-
tried. That Michigan has re-entered the Confer-
ence and should go out for victory in that field is
the opion of the entire campus; but it is equally
true that athletes particularly, with the backing of
practically all the student body, think that there is
no necessity of dropping eastern competition, and
go so far as to say that Michigan's best interests
lie in keeping up her old reputation as the west's
repres'entative in the east.
Certainly the opinion of such a splendid alumni
organization as that of New Yoik City deserves
attention; and it 'must be remembered that this
club is only one of many equally loyal bodies of
graduates throughout the east. A determination. to
retain, and strengthen .our valuable athletic asso-
ciations with that section should be evident in the
attitude of next year's authorities.
THE VALUE OF LONG TRIPS
Pros and cons arise in regard to any question of
sending a University organization on an extended
trip. Expense and absence from work are matters
that deserve first consideration. The annual opera
trip, the jaunt of the Musical club to the coast, and
the humerous lengthy journeys of the athletic
teams' should not be looked at merely as
pleasure rides to rewad the efforts of stu-
dents who have done good work. Long trips
of this kind have a much greater service to accom-
plish. They can place the name of the University
before audiences all over the country in a much bet-
ter way than 'could be accomplished by tons of liter-
ature or hours of talk. An opera performance, a
mu ical club concert, or any sort of athletic event
makes a lasting impression. Furthermore, such
trips can give alumni living in more or less distant
parts of the country an interest in the University to
be gained in np other way. The organization of
such'trips, in spite of their difficulty, should be en-
couraged wherever they possess the least 'feasibil-
ity.

TWO
STORES

G R..A WAM'S
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

I

Mary Roberts Rim
Latest Book

..9
i -

.. ......PAUL E. CHOLETTE
LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
.Henry Whiting
.-- Edward Priehs
.., Curt P.'Schneider, R. A. Sullivan
ssistants
Ieath D. P. Joyce
d Kunstadter P. P. Hutchinson
Lindsay Raymond K. Corwin
F. Rawlings Lester w. Millard
informiation concerning news for any
the night editor, who has full charge
ight.
this week will be Monday
ruesday night, J. W. Kelly ;
;e- Clarke; Thursday night,
night, C. M. Campbell. Sat-
nstein.
.Y, JUNE 2, 1920.
;NT AT THE MEET
id Michigan will act as host
from 23 different western
red in the western intercol-
lity should be lost to show
It will be the first' visit of
\rbor, and the impression of
they carry away with them
ich on the showing of our
as upon the manner in which;
and make their stay here a
should continue from the
the train until they leave.
>e given a good time before
t while the events are being
on hand to provide anything'
see that nothing is lacking
y around the locker room or'
contests usually concern 'the
le place where the event was
tual results of"'the contests,
ing :of defeat is soothed by
hing was left undone in the
roper entertainment.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect May 18, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and 'Express cars leave for
Detroit, 6:10 a. in. and hourly to
9:10 p. IA.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:40 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:40 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:45 a. m. and every two
two hours to 9:45, p.mi.
Locals to Detrolt-54 55 a.m., 7:05 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:05 p.m.,
also 11:00 p.m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson - 7:45 a.m., and
12:10 a.m.
CADET EXAMS WILL
BE HELD .JILY 12
Competitive examinations commenc-
ing July 12, for the appointment of
cadets and cadet engineers have been
announced by United States coast
guard headquarters.
Age limits are 18 to 24 years for
cadets and 20 to 25 years for engin-
eers. Cadets are graduated in three
years, engineers in one. Pay for
cadets is $600 a year and one ration
per day, while engineers receive $75
per month plus one ration each day.
Upon graduation both classes are
commissioned by the President as
third lieutenants of the coast guard,.
with same pay and'rank as officers
of the army, navy,. and the marine
corps. The mental examination, fol-
lowing the physicalt will consume
three days.
Cadets require a high school knowl-
edge of algebra, geometry, Mlane trig-
onometry, physics, spelling, composi-
tion, and geography; however cadet
engineers must take an examination
in mechanics, electricity and s$eam
engineering as' given in, colleges. The
two nearest cities for examination are
Detroit and Chicago.
SENIORS ARE URGED TO JOIN
NATIONAL SECURITY LEAGUE
Seniors are asked to seriously con-
sider joining the National Security
League. This league aims to do na-
tional civic work.- It has as immedi-
ate goals an "American America and
Permanent Justice, Order,. Peace and
Prosperity." .
This league during the war devot-
ed much of its energy towardsniak-
ing the war intelligent to all people
in the United States, by sending out
carefully prepared pamphlets.
The Bolshevistic tendency of today
makes service in such an organizai
tion a patriotic and broadening life..
If its artistic wall-paper you want,
at right prices call at C. H. Major &
Co.'s, 203 E. Washington St. Phone
237.-Adv.

IUniv(
I ightee
Sed onil
~withye

ST OUT

rsity of MiSouvenir
en handcolored photographs mount-
handmade paper. Beautifully bound
ellow and tied with silk cord.

AFFINITIES

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w
r
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r
ws
A
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{ I

S
Price only $1.60
UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

f

iunrrrrrrrnt

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TAXI

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A BRAND NEW

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ENOUGH SAID.

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ARCADE

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Up the Stairs

Hey Boy! Have You Tasted The Good
Food At The ARCADE?
Pure foods 'at low prices, prepared by experts.

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Select just what appeals to your own individual
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Bakery goods fresh from our own ovens.
Delicious coffee with rich Jersey cream.
Kindness, courtesy, and good service prevail here.

'I

Proof Incontestable=
1st Stude-Are you a follower of Robert Inger-
soll?
2d Ditto-No, sir, I am not. I am convinced
that there is a place of eternal punishment.
First-What makes you think that?
Second-I went to Sunm=er school last year.

""' "S'"""'

A

OR BROADER THINKING
the interpretation of a college
:cessful completion of a course
ts fitting the student for his life
of electing courses which, al-
mind-culture, are not'compul-
ily attending lectures which are
iey are delivered by men whose
>rld would be helpful to the un-
ccurs to them.
fault, a campaign is being
by men and women who are
advantages offered university
ider knowledge of religion and
and philosophy. The officers
istian association, recently chos-
dy at the All-campus elections,
ty'co-operation with the Y. M.
A., as well as with a committee
and women representative pf
es, to create greater interest in
us education, and thereby larg-
e curricula include not only re-
also deal with philosophy, so-
cludes interesting studies of
or problems, and study of the

TH E QUALITY OF

The heavy fees the doctors charge
To bring the sick to health
Must be to them an income large
Yet 'tis ill-gotten wealth.

..One Guess as to What Sex Submitted This One.
Stude-I've read my mind and find I cannot live
without you.
Co-ed-But---but this sudden shock is awful.
Stude-You strely must have noticed. my de-
votion to you.
Co-ed-Not that, but the discovery all at once
that you had a mind.
What, we rise to inquire, has become of the
old fashioned humorist who used to ask: "What
looks funnier than a co-ed on horseback," and then
used to make U-hall ring with glee by replying:
"'Three co-eds on horseback"
Dear Noah:
Can you tell me how to write a dialect story?
Ambitious.
The easiest way is to take any kind of a story ,
and hang it on a barn door. 'Then take a double
barreled' shotgun and at ten paces fire the gun.
Repeat the process until you have .shot out all the
vowels, and you have your dialect story.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, reckless driving," he muttered as he saws
the girl hit her thumb with the hammer.
NOAH COUNT.

ICE CREAM

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ents.
and more conclusive
such courses should
plan of University

AS K FO R IT

stu

COMPETITION
.opolitan alumni news items,
it of active loyalty to Mich-
aublished by the University
' Vrk. -i nerhs one of

AT YOUR FAVORITE FOUNTAIN

%. *"

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