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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:ept Monday during the Univer-
I of Student Publications.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
clusively entitled to the use for
es credited to it or not otherwise\
cal news published therein.
Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ail, $3.50.
uiliding, Maynard street.
orial, 2414.

ailed to Tne Dauy -yotc.
o consideration. No man-
er incloses postage.'
idorse the sentiments ex-
be received after 8 o'clock

EDITOR. ................HARRY M. CAREY,
rs-ark - oseh A. Berstin
a K. Ehibert hughHitchcock
1 M. Cambellug
erg B *rh Renaud Sherwood
E. Mc~ans
... . , .H . Hardy Heth Lee M. Woodruff
.....Brewster Campbell
at. .... .....J....... ohn I. Dakin
......R~bet C. Agll
.. . . . Marguerite Clark
.ThomaAa;s Thornton Sargent Jr.
'Assistants
k G °.Clarke Winefred Biethan
Thoas J. Whiery Robert D. sae
rldo R. W. Wrobleski, Maron Nichos,
er George Reindel ~ranes Ot'berholter,.
port orothy Monfort ~ dMap Apel
ow Minnie.' Muskatt . P. Loveoy;
ckery Harry B. Grundy Charles Murchison
afer W. F. Elliott Russell Fletcher
BUSINESS STAFF1
Telephone 960
MANAGER...............PAUL E. CUOLETTE
Clasafieddid .*. . . 4 . .. l e r a iinI
........Edward Prkhs
.:.---- -------- -y;-a pneier,. >.A. S Dvn
.................A
K". 711 u Assistants
reht F. M. Hsteath1 D. P. oye .
er Sigmiund unstadter P P. Hutchinsorn
r Harold idsay Raymond K..Corwin.
James T. Rawlings Lester w. Millard
wihing to secure information concerning news for any
Daily'hoxuld see the night editor, who has full charge
o he prsted that night.
;ht editors for this week will be: Monday
rk 4hlbert; Tuesday night, John McMan-
esday night, Hugh Hitchcock ; Thursday
rgeBrophy; Friday Might, Chesser Camp-
irdaI night, Joseph Bernstein.
FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1920.
AWISE MEMORIAILCHOICE
ing the useful and the memorial in gift
11 bear fruit annually in additions to the
Collection of books concerning the great
senior literary class has laid the founda-
a.n excellent tradition' in its wise legacy to
er. The interest from the $i,ooo turned
he class to Librarian W. W. Bishop should
upplementary funds sufficient to secure
r work of historical importance or of o-
st to be puiblished for years to come. The
920, many of whose members were partici-
:he great struggle, will perpetuate through
tamped on all books purchased under the
only its name but the memory of its pa-
vice and of Michigan's contribution to the
>f the war.'
an is, and should be, almost inordinately
its beautiful library building. Alumni
ified to this feeling in their recent excep-
ts of rare collections of books and docu-
Vith every donation of class funds for this
the University will gain in the richness and
f its bibliographical possessigns, in its fa-
r reference and reesarch work, and in the
which inevitably comes with .the best
t.t
MBEk YOUR LIFE MEMBERSHIP
is otie tie which graduates must not break
ring the University, and that is the bona
rlembership in the Union. The thousands
emberships sold during the two campaigns
of great assistance in the movement which
brought practical completio'n of the new
The whole-hearted backing of the entire
>dy has beyond a doubt made it much eas-
ure donatiPns, and has assured the success
ion idea. But many of those memberships
in on the instalment plan, with payments
d over a period of four years after grad-
nd .it is up to the graduates to see to it
promises are as good as money in the
pon these regular membership payments,
the dues of annual members, that the.
1 have to depend for income. We who will
w alumni of the next four classes know
le which has resulted in the final achieve-

:he Union; we appreciate what its facilib
cost. Ours is the duty of setting an ex-
:he classes which will follow us in the mat-
alty. If we remember our obligations we
nly be maintaining a connecting link with
mater and paying up our life membership;
e setting a valuable tradition.
orget.that annual check to the Union.
NT'T BELIEVE ALL YOU HEAR
do thiey come from, all these rumors
e hears every day on the campus? No-
say. Where do they go?, Into the thin

might, but this is not the case. They go toward do-
ing much harm- to the teller as well as the listener.
"You know I've heard-" what statementis more
common? Some rumor reaches our ears every
day. Some of them may be based on fact. Most of
ther are not. But they are all told in seeming good
faith.
There are all sorts and varieties of rumors afloat,
rumors about the Athletic association, rumors about'
certain faculty men, rumors about track men and
about our new President. Ninety-nine per cent of
these statements are false and yet they find hear-
ers, and those hearers believe what they are told.
Most of these false rumors are not conducive to
good spirits. They are insidious propaganda, di-
rected against the men and the institutions which
we would rather hear praised than blamed. Must
we always have this with us, this menace to the good
will and undivided support of the student body of
the University? It can be combatted in only one
way. That is by neither believing nor repeating any
rumor which might come to our ears until we have.
conclusively proved to ourselves that the statement
is true in every detail and that it is based on irre-
futable fact..
PRACTICALITY
"Let us have practical courses in our Universi-
ties." This is the slogan of many-who are attending
the University. It is the opinion of the majority of
students.
Time after time these same students who raise
all the hue and cry about practicability in college
courses have been offered an opportunity which they
have, evidently, failed to grasp. Eminent men in
practically every line of ' business have come here
to speak, but .have gone away disappointed at the
small crowd which turned out to hear them lecture.
The services of these men is in demand throughout
the country. Thousands of business men would be
willing, to give much time and money to hear their'
views on certain vital questions.
But when 'these men come to a university town,;
such as Ann Arbor is, they cannot finid listeners. If
there is anything in.all this talk of practicability let
those men who were so enthusiastically in its favor.
show their support to the movement by attending
these lectures. In no other way is it possible fore
them to show their sincerity, and it will not only
conclusively prove that they desire practicality but
it will also be of greater benefit to those who do
attend than they could ever hope.

TWO
STORES

GRA HAM'S
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

r
r

Shaw's Approach to Business
AT

DETROIT UNITED LINES r
(Oct. a6, 1gg)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--6:io a.
m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
"Jacksov Limited and Express Cars-S :48
a. m,,,an~ every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:os5,a. m., 9:a5 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. m., 1o:5o
t1, m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. mn., 1:10
a. mn.,and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-:48 a. m. and
t2:2o a. m
DECLARES ENGINEERS DO
NOT URBANIZE FOR VOTE
C. T. ROGAN, '20E, SAYS CANDI-
DATES N 0 T DISCUSSED I N
MEETINGS

JUST RECEIVE
THE
A new fl(

mAI

by
W H. HUDSON

IlltIt1111I'IIIIIIIIIIt II

CAN OE

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
I was very much interested in the
editorial of Wednesday's Daily rela-
tive to the rumor of the solid voting
of the engineering college for any
candidate with a "E" after his name;
and in the agitation proposed by some
individuals to organize the other col-
leges for the purpose of voting as
units in order to cope with the heavy
engineering vote. I was also surprised
and disgusted to note in The Daily of
two days ago a comment of a senior
literary student who advocates such
an organization prior to campus elec-
tion time, and who states "it is some-
times necessary to fight fire with fire."
An answer is almost due from the eng-
ineering college.
I have been 'at Michigan for four
years. During this time I have been
absent at but two class assemblies
and throughout one year I have pre-
sided' at the meetings of my class.
Never in this time has it been intim-
ated in a class assembly, that the vote
of, any or all of the engineering col-
lege be given to any engineering cand-
idate. No discussion has ever been
entertained in regard to the qualifica-
tions of any nominee, nor has any
word been uttered in these meetings
which has even suggested that the
engineers vote solidly at a campus
election.
Explains Hiavy Vote

Beckers
119 1

OPEN

I.

,.

The Telescope

'I

There was a young druggist named Sable,
Who forgot to stick on the label,
The wood alcohol within
Was mistaken for gin,
And he died on the end of a cable.
Going Bill Hart One Better
However, if you see'anyone rolling a cigarette
with his hands in his pockets, bring him in.
Kansas City Star.

Golf and Tennis Outfits
-GOLF Coats
-GOLF Knickers
-GOLF Caps
-GOLF Shirts and Polo Shirts
-GOLF Scotch Hose
-GOLF Belts
-TENNIS Duck Trousers and Flan-
Pels
-TENNIS Shirts-half sleeves
-TENNIS Belts
_TENNIS Ca--Flanan-d

1

-14u

/

An Epitaph
He went up in a great balloon,'
Attached to an umbreller,
They sifted ground and then they found
A quart of'this rash feller.

'I

1Ci1111C1 Cillll

Dear Noah: --
I recently wrote a play which producers say is
too long for the stage. What shall I do ?
Playrite.
Why not have them lengthen the stage.
bur Daily Novelette
I.
Like a hunted beast, he slunk down State street,
his manly form cloaked in a huge water-proof, a
cap pulled low to conceal his features. Some would
have thought him a criminal, but instinctively I felt
that he was not a degenerate but rather a 'martyr to
a lost cause, like the now extinct rubber-collar
salesman.
II-
Casting a furtive glance behind him he entered a
hash house; I followed him. I found him hurriedly'
drinking a bowl of mustard. Slipping on to the
stool beside him I asked, "My friend, what have
you done that society has cast you beyond its pale?
You appear to be of better stuff than the average
criminal. Tell me about it."
He turned upon me heavy-lidded eyes which
glowed gratefully with appreciation at my sympa-
thy. And with a wan smile lighting up his prema-'
turely aged"countenance he told me the story.
'III
"Time was, my friend, when I too could look the
world in the face; when the sound of a footstep ap-
proaching behind me did not bring the cold sweat
of a nameless fear to.my brow."
"But," I interrupted him, "what heinous crime
have you committed that you should so fear the
hand of retribution ?"
NHe glanced around apprehensively before reply-
ing, and then in a voice barely audible he whispered,
"You see I write the Telescope for The Daily, and
the co-eds have warned me that if I don't stop kid-
ding them they are going to do something des-
perate."

I do not believe that the engineers
vote solidly for their candidates.
I believe that a reasonably large per-
centage of them do, and that on the
other hand, a great many never con-
sider',for a moment vnoting for the eng-
ineerirg candidate. The fact that the
engineers cast a heavy vote for a
candidate from their school has not
been the result of organized and con-
centrated setion but has resulted be-
cause of the close assocaitions that
are naturally formed in this college.
(See Number 1, Page Seven)

Bu 'what you ii
merchandise. This
more than anythin
TINKER
CLOTHES, F
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highest food value.

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AT YOUR FAVORITE F

Famous Closing Lines
have," he muttered as he

d at the
JNT.

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