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May 06, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

cept Monday during the Univer-
I of Student Publications.
AsSOCIATED) PRESS
:luuively entitled to the use. for~
is credited to it or not otherwise
cal news published therein.
Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ta1, $3.50.
uilding Maynard street.
orial, 2414.
ed 3oo words, if signed, the sig-
in print, M3~t as an evidence of
be published in Tie Daily at the
a or mailed to The Daily office.
ceive no consideration. I o man-
he writer incloses postage.
rily endorse the sentiments ex-
vill not be received after 8 o'clock

limited advantages in dramatic situation. There is
no -need to look far for dramatic possibilities in the
struggle of this brave woman, her unselfish, unspec-
tacular martyrdom for the sake of humanity, and
her invincible purpose. For those who are at all
capable of literary endeavor, the contest seems well
worth while.

&i UI.

S haw's Approach .to, Business

uuI

AT

,;

MICHIGAN'S NEED

(

...............HARRY M. CAREY

Winefred Biethan
y Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichol
Frances Oberholtzer
Edna Apel
L .P .Lovejoy
Cham es Murchison
Russell Fletcher

"Michigan is a snobbish school." Such a state-
ment, spoken with all sincerity, puts 'us immedi-
ately upon the defensive.
Just how is Michigan snobbish and to what ex-
tent ?
Many of us are too indifferent when called upon
to speak to our fellow students - npt to a "half-
baked" f riend, but to a casual acquaintance in class,
to the fellow who recognizes us and who in turn is
recognized by us. Are you afraid that he might
think ybu are getting too familiar? If he does
think so,. he is a ,small man and does not belong
here; if he returns your salutation in a friendly
spiit, Michigan wants his company. This is a
large school and if there is anything which will
make it seem larger it is "not seeing the other fel-
low."
Just speak because he is a Michigan man and you
are a Michigan man. Most of us live only one
University life, and that's short enough. Perhaps
this fellow you have been passing up might some
day be'your boss; or you might run across him in
New York 'or London or where not, - maybe
Cuba. And if you area a real Michigan~ man you
will want to speak to him. You might be sur-
prised to find him a bank president, or still more
surprised to find him selling Larkin's soap; but he
is la Michigan man and for that reason deserves a
salutation.
This life is too short to nourish small prides and
prejudices, even if your father does own half. of
your city, or even if you yourself are a campus
celebrity. You can't tell which one of these men-
you 'wouldlike to know some day. Play safe!
Show democratic spirit by speaking to that class:
neighbor; if he doesn't register your friendly at-
tack, you; at least, have the satisfaction of knowing
that he does not belong here and that the quicker
he leaves the better.

......PAUL E. CEOLETTE
id A. Gaines, Mark B. Covel
- .Heny Whiting
. . . .. ".Edward. Piehs
t P. Schneider- R. A. Sullivan
D. P. Joyce
tadter P. P.Hutchinson
r Raymond K. Corwin
lungs Lester W. Millard

r

iri i i ri r u i rrirrirr . rirr r

The Telescope

TWO
STORES

I

A chemistry stude named McDuff,
While mixing a compound of stuff,
Dropped a match in the vial,
And after a while,
They~found his right shoe and cuff.

G RA H AM'S
BOTH ENDS OP THE DIAGONAL WALK

A

.-

K.

6, 1920.
r DAY

Lt.

!!0,

be

will be
lue to the
1 former
. After
o Memo-
se which
campus.
>e one of

"Is she refined?"
"Refined? Say, that girl wouldn't eat cooking
that had coarse salt in it."
Dear Noah : -
Do you know of anything that will bring my hair
out quickly? B. Alde.
Barbers' shampoos brought ours out so quickly
that we are now bald.
Hel! Help!
Prof.-Have you no excuse for such laziness?
Stude-None that will work, sir.
Yes, Clarice you might say that alley where a fight
was. held was an allegory.
DISCOVER PETRIFIED CHILDREN IN
NEW MEXICO-Recent news head.
Probably they had been rocked too much in their
'infancy.
In reply to the person who'wrote us an- anony-
mous warning to desist from jesting at the expense
of the co-eds, we wish to say at this time that no-.
body on the campus likes the girls any better than
we do. We told a friend this the other night and he
,said, "'You like them? Why, you never have any-
thing to do with them." To which we replied,
"Certainly not; that's why we' like them." 'Could
any apology be more abject than this one, we ask
you now, dear reader?
As we perpetrate this crime on an innocent pub-
lic, through the open window of our office comes the
trilling notes of an aspiring Melba in the School of
Music. And our mind goes back to that memorable'
occasion when we first read the immortal words of-
J. W. Grennier, written on the occasion Hof his first
trip past the School of Music.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern'itandard Time)
Detrat Limited and R3pess a rs-:io a..
and hourly to g:o , nr
Jackson m Lmted ,,i ERpres Cara-8:4
i., and every hour to ,9:48 p. in. (
:resses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:o a. i., g:es a
m. and every two houre to g:os p ', 10,0
. Wn. -To Ypsllatl only, rl: I P. o in.z~o
a. m., and to.Sle, chang atYpsinit.
Ypsilanti.
Local .Cars West Bound-:48 a. m. and
12:20 a m
College "Lxchane0$
Ohio-The Ohio State Lantern has
made some important changes in the-
style of- the -paper, in ordier to econ-
omize space. Certain abbreviations
are used for the nanes of the different
schools, and for the year of. the stu-
dent the numerals 1, 2, 3, 4.
DePauw- DePauw chapter of Phi
Beta Kappa has elected 13 members
from the class of 1920. The 1 chosen
from the class of 132 were those who
had the highest scholarship during
their four years' work. Of the num-
ber chosen eight were women and,
five men.
Harvard- ,Brigadier-General- Den-
nis I. Nolen, who 'at present is in
charge of intelligence instruction at
the Army War college. in Washington,
D. C., will be the guest of honor' and
principal speaker at a meeting of the
members of 'the Shannon Post of the
Amercian Legion to le held May 12.
During the war General Nolen was at-
tached to the 'general staff, holding the
position of assistant chief of staff G-{
to General Pershing. At this eano
time the election of'imers of the
Post for next 'year will take place.
Oregon-Plans for making Mother's
Day an annual campius day at the Un-
iversity of Oregon- to which mothers
of all students will e invited, were
recently completed by the student
council. Personal invitations and
cards will be sent by every student
urging his mother to visit Oregon on
May 8 and .9. A special program in
honor of them has been worked out
for the week end.
Columbia - A $1,000 telowship
which provides for one year of study
of modern health education in ele-
mentary schools at Teachers' college,
Columbia university, hs been an-
nounced to the university by the Child's
Health Organization of America. The
flowship 1is to"be awarded 'for the
best graded plan nzd outline for es
tablishing health habits for interest-
ing children.
Dinnesota - Minesot expects to
spend $100,000 fo remoelingnand e-
constructing at the "Farm." They
are planning on a new veterinary
building which is epected to be one
of themost modern structures Eof its
kind in the state."
Just Received
a Shipment of
English ock
Spring aps
-Lok thPM ov er-

VARSITY
TOGGERY SHOP
1107 S. UNIVERSITY
AVE.

0

I

M 111111l
r

ENGRAVING

±

= Orders for Engraving require n
than usual. Leave your order
VISITING CARCE
Plate and $1.00 cards $3.00
UNIV
WAHR'S mBOO

1STRAI6I
COMP
FRA
R. C.FU
HALLS~

more ti
rcard I

FULLER

. . I I , 4, , ! 1, , , . i , - I - - ",or"

STO P'I at the American I
Cigarettes, Toba
Soft Drinks, Daily and Sunday P
The American Cig
Billiards and Pocket
514 E. WILLIAM STRI
(One block from Campus

-Right

training wins.

ORDER
NOW

That's as
life as-on
cinders.

true in
the

-

S

j.

I
AIR E

ein I
for e

.1

For Mothers. Day
Send Betsy Ross Candies

felt keenly in
day's program
ing of joy and
rth; a mikture
nor ies; a wish
'ing, and a sigh

must be lean
must soon" b

D-BE PLAYWRIGHTS
isted in the writing of .drama or
aculty. for play-writing, the an-
)ntest to be held in connection
Florence Nightingale Centen-
be of considerable interest. A
d dollars is offered by the Cen-
rsing for the best "full length"
icident in the life of Florence
ze worth an effort, regardless of
,may be gained. Ample time is
contestants, as the contest does
ist first. Additional details con-
ons under which manuscripts
with a list of suggested -refer-
are posted in the Rhetoric Li-
excellent opportunity for pros-
wish to test their skill or to put
na to practical application. Uni-
especially fortunate in the fa-

Attractively packed in our own
Deluxe Gift Containers
The kind that mother will most
appreciate'

I paused, you, too, my friend would pause,
For on the cool spring air,
There came a song, a bubbling song,
Exquisite, sweet and rare.

'Twas heavenly music, heavenly,
I challenge you to find
More heavenly music anywhere,
Than this I call to mind.

Leave your order
We pack and mail

You ask me why 'twas heavenly,'
I answer that it must be,
For if not that then, pray what else,
For it certainly was unearthly.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm making money fast," murmured the stude as
he nailed the dollar bill to, the wall.
NOAH COUNT.

I

Betsy Ross Shop

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