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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 05, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

' ,,
'

i7

+

m

tled to the use for
o it or not otherwise
>lished therein.
Michigan, as second

nents ex-
8 o'clock.

M. CAREY

since' orgotten;-maKes up tne DuK I tne con-
tent.
All this would hardly be serious, if its only ill
effect were that of defeating a projected sentimen-
tal review in after years. But the fact that many
prospective university students have the opportunity
to form their estimates of Michigan from these in-.
teresting books, makes a poor choice of souvenirs
dangerous to the good opinon in which we desire
the University to be held. This means of spread-
ing favorable and just propaganda for Michigan
should not be thrown away. An M-book that repre-
sents. all that is significant and worth-while in stu-
dent life may prove an effective instrument for a
greater Michigan.
UNION FOR MEMBERS ONLY
There is no "For Members Only" sign at the en-
trance of the Union. It is impossible for the door
man to stop every one and to ask him whether he is
a member or not. Because of these facts the Union
is being used to a great extent by town people and
out of town men who are neither members nor;
guests.
The Union was built and paid for by Michigan
students and alumni. It is supported by contribu-
tions from the tuition of every student. Hence it is
the property of every man and it is his duty to pro-
tect that property from being misused. Small boys,,
obviously not students, invade the pool room and
keep members from using the tables. One reason
for the congestion of the tap room is that it is used
by so many non-members.
When you see anyone there who is obviously
not a member, it is your duty to do one of two
things. You should ejther' question the man him-
self, or speak to some employe concerning him.
In this way the Union will be kept for the exclu-
save use of those to whom it belongs - the stu-
dents and alumni of the University.
WATCH THAT !
First- impressions are often lasting ones, and the
first impression a visiting team gets of a univer-
sity's spirit is obtained through the sportsmanship
displayed at the games. An entirely erroneous im-
pression may easily be gained by visitors through
the home rooters' cheering of poor plays made by
an outside team. This is, in the main, indulged in
thoughtlessly by the minority in the heat of their
excitement but, nevertheless, manifests a spirit of
ppor sportsmanship.
Michigan has gained the reputation of being a
good loser. A good loser cheers the good plays
made by his team or by the opponents, and is silent
when a poor play is made by either team. During
the baseball season we will play many visiting tems
here, several from the conference and even such
distant rivals as California. Let us show them by
our action at the games the best chance, in
their short visit here, they will have of judging us -
that we are'true sportsmen regardless of the out-
come.

TWO
STORES

l

i

"r -

.r any
harge

Shaw's Approach toT

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 6, 1919)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:zo a
m.. and hourly to g: to p,--
Jackson Limited and Express Cars--8:8
a m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m.Ar (1x
prersses make local stops weut of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound--6:o Cm., 9:a5 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:os p. m., uo:s6
. m. To Ypsilanti only, it: p. iM., 1:10
a. mn., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.;
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound--7:43 a. m. and
2:2* a. M
Asked At Random~
"Do you think it is worth while to
keep an1M' book whilen colege T
Dewey Fagerburg, '20L, business
manager of the Michiganensian: "I
think an 'M' book 'is an unnecessary
possession. In most instances it is
but an inadequate record of college
days, consisting generally of a con~-
glomeration of unmounted junk, un-
representative of the University as a
whole. If it were impossible to secure
an elaborate yearbook costing from
$20,000 to $25,000 to publish, portray-
ing in context and in spirit one's col-
lege career, this would not hold true."
Lois De Vries, '21, president-elect
of the University Y. W. C. A.: "Years
later, when we are all much older
memories of college experiences will
be much stronger if an 'M' book was
kept while here. I would recommend
that all students who are interested
in this sort of thing, should, at the
start, gather clippings for their
books."
James E. White, '21, memper of the
cast of "Come On, Dad": "Every svl-
dent who does keep an 'M' book will
never regret doing so. In after years
it will help to keep his interest in
the University besides affording him
many hours of personal pleasure. It
would also be worth while to com-
pare it with books of friends from
other universities."
Roy E. Lounsbuiy, '22: , "I think
there is no advantage in keeping an
'M' book except the pleasure one
would, derive in putting away little
things that recall fond remembrances.
I doubt if it would be of much inter-
est to others."
PRES. HARRY B. HUTCHINS AD-
DRESSES WILWAUKEE GRADS
President Harry B. Hutchins de-
livered an address before the Milwau-
kee Michigan Alumni association in
that city Monday night. Dean M. E.
Cooley acompanted the President, but
Dean V. C. Vaughan, who also was to
go, was unable to accompany them.
They will return today.
Read the Daily for Campus News

Orders for Engraving require
than usual. Leave your orde

GRAHAM 'S
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

VISITING C
Plate and $1.00 cards I

U N

H ow

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

N'l M ARBOR CHOP SUEY- t
Excellent CHOP SUEY from
11:30 a. m. to midnight
Steaks and Chop1s 814 .State
-1

999

TAXI

K
999

ENG-RAVII

T

)us elec-
student
be' con-

',

g as units,
reason for
the rumor

C 4

'C

1""" '

.... .....y..:,, ,.. ..

The. Telescope

I

('

in

and

Keep Off the Grass
There 'are some who will
And some who won't,
There are some who -do
And some who don't.

j.! .

I

olve
the
was
fol-
ken

One student's a man
The other an ass,
One walks on the walks,
'Tother treads on the grass.
The Spirit of '"9
Prof.-Since prohibition went into effect even
alcohol has become a curse and must go.
Stude (enthusiastically)-Yes, down with it."

I

lI

COPYRIGHT'r1920
-HIRSHF. WICKWIR6'C CD

lid We Don't Mean Nawthing, Girls
tes Co-ed-Your friend's dog nearly bit me today.
di- You ought to do something about him.
ns Her escort---I will. I will ask Bill today and if he
to doesn't want too much for the dog I'll buy him.

Tuttle's
Lunches
Nunnally's
Candy
Maynard St.

[ng
Tfer

In

First senior-Why don't they call it Step-out in-
stead of Swing-out?
Second ditto-Why?
First-Because the men have to step out of the.
way to let the women lead the procession this year.,
Dear-Noah: -
Why, is the government unable to put their foot
down on the illegal practices of many large corpora-
tions? Ec Stude.
I don't know unless it is that corporations haven't,
any souls. ,

not at-

one uni-
personal
Ut rather

is.

The Holey Bands of Macaronni
A lad and a maid - a summer night,
A great temptation - it wasn't right,
.But dashing youth would take no heed,
He fell and she - how sad indeed !

PHO T 0 GRAPHS
for
_GRAD UATION!
OF COURSE!
Spedding Studio will make you
good ones.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Organized 1868
FIRST ANN ARBOR MEMBER
OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE
SYSTEM
OLDEST NATIONAL BANK
IN MICHIGAN
3 Per Cent Paid on Savings
Deposits

We invite you to investigate these good
out any obligatioh to pirchase.

MEN MARVEL at the niceties of fit in
HIRSH, WICKWIRE CLOTHES
until we explain that these results are secured by
eight important hand tailored features which others
either neglect or do not employ.

clothes with-

He was a stude and she a co-ed,
His mother wept and his father raged;
For he had slipped -his friends mourn
Tears for the lad -they are engaged.
Pamous Closing Lines
"Ha, a free soiler," he muttered as he saw the
stude using his sixth Union towel to dry his
hands. NOAH COUNT.

Wag ner & Co.

more distinctly
it.' Commence-
any amount of

303-805 South

State S

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