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May 04, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-04

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F
A

bAY AND NIGHT
SER VICE

,A

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 4, 1920.

PRICt 2THREE C

. t

.'

Engineer 's Heart & Diamond Go To
Fair W. S. G. A. Dekgate From Iowa
(E.V.) susceptible, or maybe She over-pow-
Leap year, the W. S. G. .A. conven- ered Him; but, at any rate, the very
tion, and a fair delegate from the fact that she was a delegate to the
---'"fon

r

a'l

COx-

University of Iowa, combined to bring
romance into thie sordid life of a
Michigan junior engineer. To make
a short story shorter, She came, He
saw, and She conquered.
And ngw She has returned to her
university wearing a diamond on the:
third finger left, while he remains
here to recover from the shock.
Perhaps engineers are particularly

Womens Self Government associa-
tion convention should have fore-
warned him.
They say that love at first sight is
often most lasting, distance lends en-
chantment, etc. Let these time hon-
ored sayings console the poor Junior
engineer in his hour of need, and
may all others who fear that they
are + susceptible to the wiles of wom-
en beware of the W. S. G. A..

E TO
CITY
on with
Posted

VYI 1 IiYl itl1 I II I1 I I 11 / I b M I1 1

D Gun
Tops

HIGH PRIES NOT DRUE
_TO EXCESS ...PROFIT TAX!

has
It has
t the

roclam
s. Esc
announ
attitu
aintain
in be e
Juan
to th
nth
uth, a
fterno
orts fro
appea

ia-

PROFESSOI R FRIDAY

BLAMESI

co- PRESENT PRICE ,
1c- SYSTEM
de
Led
e- Facts tending to show that the ex-
ez cess profits tax is not responsible for
lat present high prices formed the topic
of Prof. David' Friday's talk before
the feshman assembly Monday aft-
ernoon in Hill auditorium.
ac- "It is the general opinion among
°n, business men, bankers, and many oth-
m ers, that the excess profits tax is re-
ar- sponsible for present high prices," he
ile stated. "They say that prices, niust
ne be raised to cover the amount of
ce money the government takes in the
in form of this tax.
'as "The first rise began about the end
pie of 1915," he said. "Prices ha I risen
ids about six per cent by Detember of
that year., By the end of 1916 they~
had risen 40 per cent, and by March,
he 1917, at the time we entered the war,
.za they had risen 61 per cent, and at this
v- time there was no excess profits tax.
ite Since then they have varied, with an
increase amounting to about 197 per
on cent at the time of the armistice.
Les This, of course, is based on a general
ns average. Prices have risen more than

ay 3.-T
.e Carran
y gave re
argest st&

fi

light

ac- 50 per cent in the last year, when the
by income tax was only one-half as large
.in- ?s in 1917."
S. The present price system, whereby
ists some make an enormous profit and
be- others make practically nothing on
the same product' was declared by
Professor Friday to be a big fac-
_ tor in high prices of today.

SENIOR LITS NOTICE
Allmembers of the senior lit
class are urged to be present at
an important meeting at "4
o'clock Tuesday afternoon in
room 205 Mason hall. At this
meeting plans concerning
Swing-out and the class mem-
orial will be decided upon. The
social committee will also repot
their future plans for the con-
sideration of the class.
W. W. HINSHAW, JR.,
President.
'20 LITS5 TO DISCUSS
SWING OUT &1MEMORIAL
ALL-SENIOR MEN'S DINNER TO BE
CONSIDERED At MEETING
, TODAY'
Among the matters to be discussed
at the senior lit meeting at 4 o'clock
Pdis afternoon In room 205 Mason
ball are Swing-out, the class memo-
rial, and the All-senior men's din-
ner.
The plans for the 'dinner will be
presented to the class and referred
to the social committees of the other
classes. It is expected that it will
be held at the Union in the near fu-
ture and will be open to all senior
men in the University.
Line of March
The line of march of the seniors in
their caps and gowns on Swing-out
day, Thursday, will be as follows:
From Hill auditorium up North Uni-
versity avenue to Barbour gymna-
sium, down the walk to the M' in
front of the Library, down the diag-
onal walk through the Engineering
arch, and down South University
avenue to Alumni Memorial hall. The'
course of the march will describe a
huge blck :4I0M."
Group Picture
A group picture of all the senior
classes will be taken on the steps of
Alumni Memorial hall.
The president of the senior lits
urges all members of the class to be
present at the meeting this after-
noon in view of the importance of the
matters to be considered.
PLANS COMPLETED FOR DIXIE
SMOKpR AT UNION TONIGHT
Final arrangements have been om-.
pleted for the Dixie club spring smok-
er and everything is in readiness for
the festivities at the Union tonight.
Several faculty members of South-
ern extraction will make the principal
speeches. The club will also consid-
er at this time business relative to
a farewell dance for the members and
their friends at the Country club
sometime inthe near future.
OVERSEAS MEN NOTICE
An important meeting of the
Overseas club will be held in
7:30 o'clock this evening at the
Union.

WATTS A lND IIRASM
SI N ,,
French Play Characterized by Smooth-t
ness and Lack of
Monotony .
DIFFICULT PARTS CARRIED
EASILY AND ARTISTICALLY3
(J. I. D.)
Smoothness that can come only as,
the result of painstaking direction was
the outstanding characteristic of the
14th annual production of the Cercle
Francais, "L'Ami Fritz," which was
presented last night in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. While this year's com-
edy lacked the opportunity for action
of last year's "Nos Intimes," the play
was so unusually well done that
breaks- and monotony were very lit-
tle evidenced.
David A. Watts, '21, as Fritz Kobus,
the high living bachelor bore the bur-
den of the acting with a vigor that
was pleasing to sa'y the least. Vie
demonstrated a marked sense of dra-
matic values making the most of this
part and repeated on a larger scale
his success of last year Watts pos-I
sesses a fine stage presence and cre-
ates a character that holds the audi-
ence's attention for every minute he
is on the stage. These qualities
make up for any slight deficiencies in
his accent.-
/ Jiras Scores Hit
B. C. Jiras who upderto6k the dif-
ficult character portrayal of the Rab-
bi David Sichel scored a decided hit;,
his pronipciation was excellent and
he exhibited a good sense of balance
in his acting.
Margaret Beckett, '22, in the part
of the demure little da4rymaid-
heroine, was self-conscious when she
was supposed to be, and fitted pre-
cisely into a part that wa ultra-
ingenue.
Difficult Part Handled Well
A. J. Himmelhoch, '20, made a suc-
cess, of a very difficult part of the
overly enthusiastic gourmand.
W. G. Sharp, Jr., '22, played the
companion figure of the tax gather-
(See Number 1, Page Six)
FELLOWSHIP WINNERS
Awarding of fellowships for the
year 1920-21 was announced following
the Board of Regents' meeting Friday.
Degrees of M.A. and M.S. were con-
ferred by the Graduate School to
Ross McLean and George Maxwell re-
spectively.
Carl Brumm felowships of $500
each were given to"Florence Fenwick,
'17, and Leon Leonian, University of
Kentucky. Martha Guernsey, '19,
Marrits Wilhelm Senetins, Univer-
sity of Utrecht, Ernest Brunquist,
Bates college, and Paul Warren, Uni-
versity of Maine, were made recipi-
ents of the University fellowships of
$500.-
The University fellowships of $300
were awarded to Karl Guenther, '20,
Constance Hopkin, '20, Arthur Orten-
burger, '20, Yuki Osawa, grad., Ade-
laide Adams, '20, Charles Fries, Buck-
nell university, Evelyn Garfiel, Colum-
bia university, Clyde Mason, Univer-
sity of Oregon, Benjamin Shapiro, Sy-
racuse university.
Howard Poole, and Merle Storr, Oi-
vet college, received the University

fellowships of $250.
The Board granted degrees in the
literary college to the following:
George Alan, '19, Don Harlan, '19,
Walter 0. R. Johnson, '17, Charles
McAlpine, '20, Russel McCaughey,
'19, Faith M lett, '20, William Nie-
mann, '17, Harold Reeves, Marie
Stolz, '19, Donald Yerkes, '19.
Teachers' diplomas were granted
Alexander Crockett, '19, and Marie.
_ Stolz, '19. \

former embers
Of Daily harry
Mildred C. Mighell, '18, managing
editor 6f The Daily during the first
semester of the year 118-19, and Vin-
cent . Rlorden, '20, news editor of
The Daily during the same period,
were married in Chicago Saturday aft-
ernoon.
Miss Mighell is a member of Phi
Beta Kappa and Mortarboard societ-
kes, For the past year she hasbeen
working, as copy writer' for the J.i
Walter Thompson advertisin'g firm of
Chicago. Riorden, who graduated in
February, is a member of Sigma Delta
Chi. He is connected with the Adrian
Telegram in Adrian, where the couple
will make their home.
,Y &12 CLSSES9
SELECT NOMINEES
Junior Engineers and Freshman
Laws Name Aspirants for
Election
COUNCIL UNABLE TO ISSUE
FULL LIST OF CANDIDATES
Candidates to be voted upon at the
All-campus election May 12 were an-
nounced yesterday by the Y. M. C. A.,
the junior engineers, and the fresh-
man laws. At the meeting of the
Student council election eommittee
held last evening it was found that the
list of candidates from all the organ-
izations on the campus was incom-
plete, but it was expected that the
entire ticket would be announced to-
morrow.
Y. M. C. A. Candidates
For president-C. Stewart Baxter,
'21, and Roswell P. Dillon, '21E.
For vice-presidents, Baptist-Guy S.
Shoemaker, '21E, and Gale L. Wessdn-
ger, '21E; Congregational, Laurence
E. Frost, '21E, and Clarence N. John-
ston, '21E; Disciple, Alan F. King, ex-
'20E, and Roswell B. Shurts, '21E;
Episcopal, William F. Angell, '21,
and LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr., '21E;
Lutheran, Oswald Michelmann, '22,
afid Herbert F. Von Ewegen, '21P;
Methodist, Leon E. Grubaugh, '21, and
Charles B. Stegner, '22L; and Pres-
byterian, Chesser M. Campbell, '21,
.and Donald J. Porter, '21. /
For Student councilman-James K.
Pollock, Jr., '22L, and Lee M. Wood-
ruff, '21. These men are the asso-
ciation's candidates for the All-cam-
pus representatives in the council,
'21E Nominees
The junior engineers named the fol1-
lowing men to 'run for the Student
council, two to be elected L. E. Frost,
'21E, C. N. Johnson, '21E, F. R. Stor-
er, '21E, and C. G. Wetzel, '21E.
For eectiVg to the honor commit-
tee the same class selected as candi-
dates J. H. Pilkington, '21E, and E.
H. Kirby, '21E. One is to be elected.
At their class meeting yesterday
afternoon the freshman laws named
John C. Cary, '22L, and Irving A. Jen-
nings, '22L, as candidates for the Stu-
dent council.
BARBARISM EXPRESSED IN
ROMANTIC ART, SAYS THOMSON

KLAOMASTORM
TAKES DEATH TI
150 INJURED BY GALE, ACCO
IG TO ILEPORTS TO
MUSOGEE
PEGGS WIPED OUT; NO
ONE HOUSE REMAI
Special Train With Doetors, Nit
and Equipment Leaves For
. Seene of Devastation
BULLETIN
Muskogee, Okla., May 8.-T
bath toll at Peggs, Cherok
county, from the tornado reach
51 at 6 o'clock tonight, accordi
to a telephone message from I
cast Grove. There were sev
persons unaccounted for wi
about 100 injured.
A special train bearing the i
jured has been dispatched fr
Muskogee.
Muskogee, Okla., May 3.--Fifty
sons are reported killed and more
150 injured in a storm said to:
destroyed the little town of P
Cherokee county, Okla., last nigh
Reports to the MTuskogee Ti
Democrat from Locust Grove and'
lequah, where dead and injured
Peggs are being taken, said that.i
house was left standing in Peggs
being struck by a tornado which
considerable damage in this se
of the state yesterday.
Train Leaves for Peggs
A special train carrying doctors
nurses and equipment left Musk
for Peggs this morning. All do4
and nurses in Tahlequah alsol
gone.
Practically every store in T
quah, which is the county sea
Cherokee county, has closed, and
eral hundred persons have gox
Peggs to do rescue work.
Direct communication with
stricken town was impossible
morning, as all wires from Mush
to Peggs are 'down.
Thirty-seven bodies have beer
covered from wrecked houses in
storm-demolished town, accordin
a telephon'e report from Tahlei
This )informaion was brought by
first man to arrive .froh Peggs t4
Twenty bodies are reported to
been taken from one building.
Narrow Escapes Reported
Passengers on a Missouri, Ka
& Texas train which reached Ch
Okla., said tl4 they, had obsq
large areas of d astated country
south o(Vinita. Many narrow es
were reported.
23 DEBATERS TO
COMPETE FOR C

LAW GRAD GIVES
LECTURE COURSE

town
ener-
, the
take

any compli-
i States au-
iat in a bat-
ito American
re than half

s and
wvolu-.

their hands.
nication with
be by ocean

In a series of five lectures to be
given in the Law school this week,
Arthur H. Ryall, '02L, of Escanaba,
will discuss the law relating to pub-
lic utilities.
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school said of Mr. Ryahl: "He is a
man who has had much experience
before public utilities commissions in
different parts of the country and in
many different states, and is 'at the
present time one of the leading au-
thorities in the country on public
utilities and their legal bearing.
These lectures will be of particular
interest to all law and economics
students."
The first talk was given at 4 o'clock
e'terday in room A- of the Law
building. The rest will follow dur-
ing the week at the same time and
place.
LITERARY BUDGET COMMITTEE
HOLDS ALL-DAY SESSION
Dean John R. Effinger together with
Regents Beal and Iubbard, compris-
ing the budget committee of the lit-
erary college, met In session all day
yesterday with the heads of depart-
ments in that college. Budgets pro-
posed for sub-departments were re-
viewed and recommendations will be
made to the Regents' general commit-
+PAa n+s n f A nrst+ budget

RS

a, honorary fratern-
e and the allied arts,
ing elected six sen-
lip.
re: L. A. Abel, '20A,
20, K. W. Kranz, '20,
0A, S. G. Wiener,
erex, '20A. The mem-
serlt the 15 per cent
ass ranking highest

"The Celts hear, the siren and suc-
eumb, the, Greeks hear the siren and.
pass on."
This' was the keynote of the lecture
given yesterday afternoon by Mr. J.
A. K. Thomson, formerly of Oxford
and now of Harvard, on "The Roman-
tic Element in Greek Literature." He'
stated that Hellenism was developed
in opposition to barbarism, romantic
art being the expression of barbar-
ism and classic art being the expres-
sion of Hellenism.
. Early Grecian writers were, com-
pared to Shakespeare, Tennyson, and
Longfellow. "Hiawatha might have
been better done in the form of a
Russian folk-song," said the lecturer.

Freshmen, of the Alpha Nu and
Adelpbli Literary societies will n
in their annual debate for the D
Sigma Rho cup at 8 o'clock Wedi
da night in Sarah Caswell An
hall. This cup is awarded to the
ciety which shall win it three ti:
in succession or four times out s
en. Adelphi has won the debate th
times and Alpha Nu twice. The
bate Wednesday night may detern
the permanent owner of the cup.
The teams are as follows: \Al
Nu-Edward T. Ramsdell, '23, )
mond P. Lewis, '23, and Jesse
Brumbach, '23; Adelphi-Leo Me
'23, Saniuel Ruben, '23E, Henry He
'23.
The sublect of the debate is:
solved, That all disputes between
ital and labor should be submitte
a suitable tribunal for settlement
parties to abide by the decision.
Profs. Thomas C. Trueblood and X
R. Brumm have been secured to
as judges.

was elected
or the com-

Led uu We Ui11Vei 31Ly vuug L.

. - . .. 4 ..

teCs

May

raalv

Assembly Hall Michigan Uni
FRIDAY NIGHT, MAY 7
Dancing 9 -2. TicKets $5.00 on Sale to Can
at 5 P. IN. Today at Union after that alway
Sale in Architectoral Corridor, Eng. Bl1

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