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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


(

TION OF PRESIDENT
ANGELL

CIAL NEWSPAPER, OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
ed every morning except Monday during the Univer-
y the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ssociated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
n of all news Oispatches credited to it or not otherwise
this paper and the local news published therein.
I at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
r.
iption by carrier or mail. $3.50.
:Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard street.
Business, 96o; Editorial, 244.
nications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
f the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
ommunications will receive no consideration. No man-
. be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
aily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
the communications.
s Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
iing preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
G EDITOR.................HARRY M. CAREY
Mark K. Ehlbert Edgar L. Rice
. M. Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
George Brophy Hugh Htchcock
McMas Hardy Heth Lee M. Woodruff
............Renaud SherwoOd
tant ............ ..John I. Dakin
tant ....-. ...BrewsterCampbell
-....Robert C. Angell
)epartmient..... ...... .* ... . Marguerite Clark
.............. Thmas AdmsThornton Sargent Jr.

Assistants
G. E. Clarke
Thomas J. Whinery
R. W. Wrobleski
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt
Harry B. Grundy

Winefred Biethan
Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholtrer
Edna Apel
Z. P. Lovejoy
Charles Murchison
Russell Fletcher

This morning's service in the Congregational
church is one that should be' of especial interest
to all men and women of the University. At this
time a bronze tablet marking the pew occupied, for
many years by President James B..Angell will be
unveiled. The remainder of the service will also
be in President Angell's memory, being composed
of an address on his life and a selection of his
favorite hymns.
The record of President Angell's life on the cam-
pus forms one of the finest chapters in the history
of our University. Although few of us have had
the good fortune of coming in contact with him,
his work and influence have been described in such
glowing terms by all who knew him that his name
has taken its place in the foremost ranks of those
whose memories are inseparately linked with the
growth and progress of Michigan.
The name of President Angell means much to
all Michigan students. The opportunity to show
our veneration for this man by our attendance
at a service in his honor is one of which we should
consider it our duty to avail ourselves.
STAY OVER FOR COMMENCEMENT
Commencement week this June promises to be the,
most memorable event of its kind the University has
ever seen. More than 25 classes will be repre-
sented in, the alumni reunion, and the estimated
number of alumni who will return is conservatively
placed at between I,500 and 2,000. For this great
throng of graduates, the seniors and their friends,
and the many who will remain over commencement,
an unusual program of entertainment has been pro-
vided.
Reunion day, Tuesday, June 22, will be featured
by class gatherings, the Senior Girls' play, and a
Union entertainment in hill auditorium. The
alumni will reciprocate with their entertainment on
Wednesday afternoon, after which all will adjourn
to the Michigan-California baseball game. Gradua-
tion on Thursday, with its acompaniments of
the Senior promenade and the Senate reception,
will bring to a climatic close the many events of
the week.
Every undergraduate who can possibly stay*
over for commencement should remember that this
occasion is the greatest on the University calen-
dar. It signals the passing of another class into
the destinies for which Michigan has prepared each
. member, and around it have grown up the most
worth-while traditions of the alma mater. It is
an event which no graduate can ever remember
without a return of loyal sentiment; and the
undergraduate also should carry away fyom it im-
pressions which will make him a better Michigan
man. The excellent entertainment program is only
an added inducement.to attend an event which in
itself should demand our presence. I
Alumni, who have come long distances for the
reunion, will be given a stirring proof of the ex-
istence of the old Michigan spirit if a large part
of the student body stays over to greet them and
accompany them to commencement.

TWO
STORES

BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

p

BUSINESS STAFF
- Telephone 960
ES8 MANAGER..................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
iing ..............LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Cov o
a and Classified Ads..........Hnr tng =
ation «. ............................ .....Edward Tris
S .tin.. .'.. . . ..... . . . '...... curt P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan
Assistants
amnbrecht F. M. heath D. P. Joyce
. KDerr Sigmund Kunstadter Robt Sommerville
Gower Harold Lindsay Lester W. Millard
James T. Rawlings
srsons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
news tobeprinted that night.
1e night editors for the week will be: Monday
:, Chesser Campbell; Tuesday night, Edgar
; Wednesday night, J. E. McManis; Thursday
:, George Brophy; Friday night, Mark Ehl-
Saturday night, Joseph A. Bernstein.
SUNDAY, MAY 2, 1920.
°WHEN MICHIGAN SPEAKS
hen a great University is endowed with the
mee of a great man, the great University ap-
ates it. And when the great Univ rsity loses
reat man, it attempts to show that man ap-
ation of his services..
he University of Michigan is about to lose one
s greatest presidents - Harry Burns Hutchins.
iigan has profited through his administration,
is about to voice its appreciation in a way that
ot help' but perpetuate his memory for every
ent who, from this day on, shall enter the
's of the Michigan Union - and there will be
sands
he Union has actively begun its campaign to
re the painting of President Huchins' por-
. The students of the University have been
d upon to aid that campaign. This is scarcely
.ie presentation of the case. They can hardly
been asked to do such a thing. They are
er being given an opportunity of expressing
for which they can find no better method of
'ession.
is not necessary to repeat the well known
rd of achievements with which President
,hins has showered the campus. Every one
sees the Michigan Union, the Library, and
comes in contact with any of the alumni, and
nded of his work upon every occasion.
ichigan will carry the campaign for Presi-
Hutchins' portrait to a successful close.
-y man in Michigan will want to take a part in
campaign..
THE DONOR'S BOOK
eginning Tuesday one of the biggest features
he Hutchins' portrait-fund drive will be the
ilation of the Donor's Book. This book will
ain the signatures of each man who gives in
manner whatsoever toward the picture-fund.
solicitors will, upon receiving the donator's
cription, have him sign his name, class in the
rersity, and the city from which he comes, in
ink upon one of the loose-leaf sheets of cream-
led paper which the solicitor will have with
This signature in blue ink upon a cream
red background will give as near as possible
desired effect of Maize and Blue. When all
sheets are turned in they will 'be compiled in
form and bound in leather.
he day the pictu-re is unveiled this Mkather
d book containing the signatures of every do-
r will be presented to President Hutchins. It
also contain the home addresses of men
g in all parts of the United States and many
gn countries. Such a book should 'prove a
orial which President Hutchins may 4ways
as a fitting token of the feeling borne by tie
'e student body toward its outging leader.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 1919)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6 :o a.
in., and hourly to 9:Io p. mi.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. mn., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (rx-
presses make local stops west of Ann.Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:05 a. m., 9:*5a.
m. and every-two hours to 9:os p. m., 10:50
U. M. To Ypsilanti only, x x:.~ p. Mn., 1 :1o
a. m and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti,
Local Carr West Bound--7:48 a. m. and
12 20 a. m.
"Do you think the Chimes has sue-
ceeded in its original purpose?"
Lawrence E. Frost, '21E, member
of Tau Beta Pi: "Yes, I certainly_
think it has in more ways than one.
The editorial policy has been excep-
tionally good, while the articles on
general campus problems were always
well worth the time spent in reading
them. From all I've heard from' oth-
er fellows it has the support of the
entire campus."
Mary. D. Lane, '21, vice-president
elect of the Y. W. C. A.: 'Personally I
think the Chimes has been successful
to some extent, in carrying out its ori-
ginal purpose. For a first year pub-
lication has done well indeed. Some
of the articles that especially inter-
ested me were: 'The Faculty Upside
Down' and 'The Underpaid Faculty.'
In my opinion the fiction could be im-
proved
Julian Joseph, '21, captain of the
Varsity cross country team: "I'sure-
ly believe the Chimes has succeed-
ed in all respects. The way vitally
important discussions have been treat-
ed has, alone, been of exceptional
interest to the great majority in the
University. I sincerely hope its first
year high standard will be maintained
for many years to come."
Helen Bishop, '22, treasurer elect of
the Women's Athletic association: "I
enjoy the Chimes very much myself.
From what I have heard, I believe it
does not interest the, campus as a
whole, for at times it could well at
ford to have more pep. With this
one exception, I think it has been un
usually good for a first year publica-
tion."
RURAL SOCIOLOGY TO BE
DISCUSSED AT CONVENTION

ORDER
E uNG NOW
Orders for Engraving require more time
than usual. Leave your order card for
- M
VISITING CARDS
-m
_. Plate and $1.00 cards $3.00 and up
UNIVERSITY
- HBOOKSTORES
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The Telescope

I

In these days of unrestrained frivolity it is well
for 'us at time's to occasionally, ponder over the
more serious side of life. It is for this reason that
we'reprint J. W. Greenier's latest literary effort
with the hope that our readers will give it the se-
rious attention which it merits.
I stepped out on the ocean
Not a taxi was in sight
So I turned into a plumber shop-
To dine and get a light.
I ordered horse-shoes greenish hot
With needles for a chaser,
And lit my ten penny cigar
With my ever-sharp eraser.
Again I stepped out on the deep
And there a subway car
Was sailing far above my head,
I shinned its landing bar.
"Down;" came the cry and up there flew
each window far and Wide,
And then we sank beneath the waves
Careening on our side.

Ames, Ia., May 1.-Rural sociology
will be presented to rural ministers
and laymen of thirty denominations
at the Iowa State College during the
three weeks beginning June 14, ac-
cording to announcement here. States
which will send delegates 'to the
"school" include Iowa, Illinois, Wis-
consin, Minnesota, Kansas, Nebraska
and Missouri. Classes in religious
education, rural sociology, agriculture
extension ,problems and rural educa-
tion will be held.
The Michigan Daily, the only morn-
ing paper in Ann Arbor, contains all
the latest Campus, City and World
News.-Adv.
SUNDAY DINNER

y' /
r/
' .1

4. .
"' ~ -

,.

I,

MENU

I I

soup
Ceram of Asapragus
Wafers

Luxuriant water bathed my lungs
And banished every ill,
A sword fish played a violin
And presented us his bill.

Hungry, ashore I turned to buy
Some nails, but I was broke
I pulled a cream pie from my jeans
And suddenly awoke.
The other night we were out with a co-ed friend
and we determined to beat her to it and do most
of the talking ourself for a change. Finally she
got sore and turned, to us and says, "Well, I wish
you'd have the courtesy to stop when I lookat you
any way." And in our best English we replied,.
"I ain't no clock." And she not only refused to
laugh but actually wanted to go right home.
Pamous Closinq Lines
"Bright things fall front her lips" he muttered
as he saw her drop the filling out of her gold
tooth. - NOAH COUNT.

Olives" ePickles
Roast Sirloin Beet
Brown Gravy
Fricasseed Chicken with Biscuit
Cut Wax Reens
Mashied Potatoes
DESSBRrT
Hucleberry Pie
Vanilla lce Cream

IN NO OTHER CLOTHES-ready to wear-
will you find the soft, easy, dressy effects which are
instantly noticeable in
HIRSH, WICKWIRE CLOTHES
These results have been secured because this good
clothes making institutiop has the courage to cut and
tailor every garment by hand,
We invite you to investigate these good clothes with-
out any obligation to purchase,

Tea

Strawberry Sundao
Coffee

Milk

12 TO 2;00 P. M. PRICE $1Q0
Come Early.
A La Carte Seryice-5-7P.mn

WAGNER & CO

A

303-305 SOUTH STATE

WILLITS CAFE
315 S. State street
Phone 173

_ . . , , :

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