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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 01, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[CIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
ed every morning excpt Monday during the Univer-
y the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
)i of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
this paper and the local news published therein.
d at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
r.
ption by carrier or mail, $3.50.
:Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard street
: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
anications,not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
notices ofevents willrbe published in The Daily at the
of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
ommunications will receive no consideration. No man-
I be returned unless the ,writer incloses postage.
aily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
the communications.
's Going On" notices will not b received after 8 o'clock
ning preceding insertion.
EDITORIAl STAFF
Telephone 2414
G EDITOR.....................HARRY M. CAREY
ors-
Idark K. Ehilbert Edgar M. ice
C. M. Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
George Brophy Hugh Hitchcock
J. E. McManis
.........H. Hardy Heth. Lee M. Woodruff
..........Renaud Sherwood
tant ...................John I. Dakin
tant .... ........... .... ...Brewster Campbell
........Robert C.. Angel
Departmnent..."..............Marguerite Clark
......Thomas Adams. Thornton Sargent Jr.

Assistants
G. E. Clarke
Thomas J. Whibery
R. W. Wrobleski
George Reindel
t Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt
ry Harry B. Grundy

Winefred Biethan
Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer
Ednna Apel
E. P. Lovejoy
Charles Murchison,
Russell Fletcher

done, but a report was first prepared setting forth
the drawbacks of the present society and constitu-
tion and then methods of remedying these faults
wore proposed and discussed. Their final conclu-
sions have been incorporated in the new constitu-
tion.
The need for the reorganization has long been
felt and it is hoped this new document will pro-
duce the desired results. Each engineer should
make it a point of reading the proposed constitution
thoroughly so that he may cast his ballot intelli-
gently.
PRACTICAL HUMANITY: THE Y. W. C. A.
*DRIVE
The spirit which is behind the Y. W. C. A. drive
for $1,700 to aid Dr. Clara M. Sargent, 'I5M, in
her Women's Public Health Campaign in China, is
that of world-wide good-will and broad humanity.
Such evidence of real syfpathy as Michigan
women - are displaying through their free-hearted
contributions cannot fail to create a lasting friend-
ship among their less fortunate siste-s in Asia.
Dr. Sargent is representative of that class of
Michigan women who come to college with a defi-
nite aim for the future, and a determination to
make their life and their university training real
factors in world progress. Her personality and her
career have brought great credit to Michigan; and
by standing behind her in her new plan of organized
medical work among Chinese women, contributors
are not only seizing an opportunity to do good in
a most practical way, but are proving that the spirit
which Dr. Sargent exemplifies still lives among the
Michigan women of today.
THE UNION'S PLACE
When the idea of constructing a large building on
our campus for the use of men was first thought
of, it was realized that such a building was almost
essential in the growth of the University. This
idea 'resulted in the final construction of the Michi-
gan Union. It was to be dedicated solely to the
men of Michigan.
Since the .first day the building was opened we
have been working to create an individual atmos-
phere that would be especiallyattractive to the men
on the campus. Such an atmosphere could only be
developed by the students themselves.
It was, as said, to be something different. Men
were to feel free to act without fearing that they
might be encroaching upon the rights of women.
To this end it was decided that only certain por-
tions of the building, and these only under certain
conditions, were to be turned over for the use of
members and their friends of the other sex. Also,
that women who. were given the privileges of the
building would have to enter by the north entrance.
These rules were rot made, as some seem to think,
to discriminate against anyone; they were made
necessary in order to carry out the fundamental
idea of the whole building scheme.
Imagine the change of atmosphere that would be
brought to an afternoon bridge party in Martha
Cook by the sudden entrance of men. So, also, is'
- the atmosphere in the Union changed by the en-
trance of women. The idea of having a building
for "Men Only" is not a one sided matter, but a
question of University concern. The erection' of
the Woman's League building will do much to solve
conditions. But the temporary problem of keep-
ing the Union solely a Man's institution can only
be brought about by the co-operation of all.

TWO
STORES

G RAHAM'S
BATH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

p -a---

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. a6, rig)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:zo a.
in., and hourly to g9:10 p. mt.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make ocal stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars ast Bound-6:os a. m., g:os a.
m. and every two hours to g:os p. m., t0:50
. m. To Ypsilanti only, ri:45 p. m., 1::o
a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
LocaIACara West Bound-7:48 a. m. and
is:2o a. m.
Asked At Random

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
ES MANAGER..................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
sing......... LeGrand A Gaines, Mark B Covell
and Classified Ads.............Henry Whiing
tion :.-. . . . .- -...-..-Edward Priehs
tiont.... ... ". "....... ..Curt P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan
Assistants
Lambrecht F. M. Heath D. P Joyce
0.Ker Sigmuind Kunstadter Rob Somv""Z i
ceower HaodLnsyL;trW ilr
James T. Rawlings
t ----e
rsons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
f The Daily should see the night editor, who has full. charge
ews to be printed that night.
e night editors for the week will be: Monday
Chesser Campbell; Tuesday night, Edgar
Wednesday night, J. E. McManis; Thursday
George Brophy; Friday night, Mark Ehl-
Saturday ight, Joseph A. Bernstein.
SATURDAY, MAY 1, 1920.
SUPPRESSION
is sometines the unpleasant duty of newspa-
to publish informatin which, at first glance;
seem, only a concession to curiosity-a sensa-
and dishonorable means of securing atten-
for its columns. In considering a case of this
however, an unconsciously sentimental atti-
often inclines us toward wrong conclusions.
onsider merely the local discomfort and shame
s caused, rather than the general good which
result..
rw and then, such 'unfortunate contingenc'is
in the University; and The Daily, strivng
llow the system of ethics laid down by the .
ts of greater society,'is obliged, in the face of
ism, to publish facts whose suppression would
safe. 'The law of the University, administered
e faculty, is- not a thing apart from the stu-
-it is the voice of the Campus. Its purpose
protect us from unfair limitations and aggres-
which might otherwise be imposed by stu-
, one on another ; it is not merely a means of
ying a disagreeable moral passion 'often at-
:ed to the faculty. A violation of .this law,
fore, is a violation of the covenant between
nts for the general good.
niishment for such a violation is obviously
sary to prevent it in the future, with a gen~
mowledge of the departure as the only means
arning the rest against it. But its more im-
nt purpose, that of correcting the offender by
s of those against whom he has offended, is
> obvious. This is not a vengeance by the stu-
body upon an aggressor apart from it and out-
ts range of sympathy; it is the means of re-
ing a culprit-reinstatement of the sort which
ight by an offending child, in family life, with
An of temporary disgrace..
thout the penalty, the integrity 'of student so-
would be endangered; by suffering it publicly,
ffender restores himself to equal footing with
wst. It is with these facts in view, rather than
iperficial and temporary expediency of shield-
n offender and his friends from puhlic dis-
that The Daily follows what must often seem
kind and unfriendly policy. .
THE PROPOSED ENGINEERING
CONSTITUTION -
:er considerable work the committee in charge
ucceeded in drawing up a constitution for the
leering society which they feel will eliminate
rawbacks of the present one and succeed in
g considerable strength to the society. This
tution will be submitted at the campus elec-
May 12.
e committee in charge of the work -was com-
of men representing all of the branch engi-
g organizations besides the officers of the
tIc and Engineering society, so that many
oints of the situation in the Engineerin col-

"Do youthink an effort should be
made to secure more college spirit at
baseball games, by singing and or-
ganized cheering!"
Peter J. VanBoven, '20, Varsity base-
ball man: "Yes, indeed I do. Com-
pared to other schools Michigan is
rather 'weak in the spirit exhibited at
baseball games. There is no reason
why we shouldn't have a cheer lead-
er and the band at every game, es-
pecially when one considers the size
of Micihigan as compared to some of
the schools we play. I would like to
see more enthusiasm."
Edward G Mraz, '21E, Varsity base-
ball man: "In the first place one can-
not expect as much enthusiasm at a
baseball game as a football contest.
I don't know how it was last year,
but in 1918 the support was good. I
do think, however, that we should
have a yell master, for fellows often
like to cheer but need someone to lead
them."
Willis Hayes, '20E, Varsity baseball
man: "This is exactly what we need
at the present time. The singing of
"Yellow and Blue" at the end of the
seventh inning, abband, and organized
cheering should be encouraged. Nothi-
ing ts more pep into a team than
having someone behind them-yell-
ing."
James F. Newell, '22E, Varsity base-
ball man: "I think the school should
support the team with a band at every
game. One thing that should absolu-
tely be discontinued is the practice
of 'riding' fellows who make some mis-
take. Personally I am not in favor of
having a cheer leader."
SUMMER CURRICfLUM TO HAVE
COURSE IN EUROPEAN HISTORY
A course in begjnning European
history will 'be offered for the first
time in a summer session this year.
It is the same course as the history
given in the regular first semester
of the University year, and is especi-
ally designed for freshmen and sopho-
nores who have had no other college
work in modern European history.
The Daily contains the latest Asso-
ciated Press News.-Adv.

E ORDER
ENGRAVING -
NOW
Orders for Engraving require more time
than usual. Leave your order card for
r r
VISITING CARDS
Plate and $1.00 cards $3.00 and up
SW AH R'UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES
1111111i1111ili111 11 111111111] 111 [titlli till I'ell [[IsII III11111111|1|11
A noted librarian says:
"I don't know how it is with other people,
but my memorizing is mental-picturing."
Do not regard mental-picturing skeptically. The chances are you don't
comprehend it. It does imprbve concentration, attention, mental association
of one thing. with another-you begin to see things-the power of memory
grows-thought, anAysis, comprehension groiw. "Memory and Concentration,"
(a new booklet). Twenty exercises for mental improvement
Students' Edition, hoc, at all bookstores.,
Or by mail with'typewritten letter tf instruction, $r.
The Education Courses, Box g8, Ann Arbor.
t
Hcreis a realpaint-
roe Brothers High fore it always costs less per Ag
sareyard applied.
Standard is-- better pmit HghStandard has been
thm ou avee~e usd .ade for 50 yars-iaf noth-
thiyn aeeerue g but the beat and purest a
before. Better beeause it materials obtainable.'WN
lasts longer. and looks bet. We want you to try it on ®O
yMur next painting job. You O
ter as long as kt lasts. will never againuse any other
mor p g alfoitges far Ask for booklet and color
-~t ther other paints, there- card. Both are free.
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OSW AL D. AnH E RZ
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TEXT BOOKS for EC. 32-B O.&M.
Shaw's Approach'to'Dusiness Poblems
AT

4.

:

.

a

the Telescope

I

A suggestion has come to hand that the birds who
persist in tramping out the campus lawns organize
a Jaywalkers' club and that they have for their
motto the following:
Count that day lost whose low descending sun,
Views from thy feet no grass destruction done.
We Don't Know Whether to Score This One as a
Hit or an Error
Co-ed-What do you think of Fielding?
'23-No good unless backed by good hitting.
ear Noah:
T hs summer I intend going on the stage with a
contortionist act. What sort of a diet would best
fit me f6r this work? Stude.
Try living on green apples.
Say You, KEEP OF THE GRASS!
One certain august person
In hastening on .to class
Was seen to make a sudden turn
And cut across the grass.

4.

IJART SCHAFFNER & MARX

CLOTHES

A

M~A
'1
t
{f1 j

'Twas just a question of a step,
Say two or three or four,
That he would save by such a path
Into the nearest door.
If we remember rightly
A week has yet to pass
Since he made such a fine appeal
To save our "noble grass.
Now those who always advocate
What's best for all to do,
Had better get real busy now
And learn a thing or two.
KEEP OFF THE GRASS!

.
'
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y y " .
1
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J' S
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,;

Our Prices are Very

Reasonable

*.

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You will be delighted with the fit and it is
remarkable what a difference in your appear-
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make of clothing.
Back of the elegant styles is a gound-work of
Woolen Fabrics and
Dependable ,Tailoring
that will make your investment in these gar-
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HATS - CAPS - SHIRTS

are consistent with the times. They are in-
geniously fashioned, better fitting and better
tailored. than many other; makes.

'A

Reule, Conlin, Fiegel-Co
Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes
Southwest Corner of Main and Washington Streets

a

Famous Closing Lines
"My life is at stake," murmured Joan of Arc as
they lighted the fagots around her.
* NOAH COUNT.

THE BIG StORE

P- M " -

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