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May 01, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-01

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DIAY AND NIGHT W11
$ERTICE

.XXX. No. 150. ANN ARBOR, MIC;IGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 1920. PRICE THREE C

MAYDAY TROUBLE
NOT EXPECTED TO
'BE CUTYWD
DEPT. OF JUSTICE OFFICIALS
WARN AUTHORITIES TO BE
ON GUARD
REPORTS FROM WHOLE
NATION CHECKED OVNR
Federal, State, and City Forces Pre-
pare to Combat Overt Acts
of Any Radicals
(By Associated Press)
Washington, April 30. - After
checking over confidential reports
from all parts of the country, officials
expressed the opinion that threatened
May day demonstrations by radicals,
would not result in any nation-wide
demonstration.
While taking this view of the, sit-
nation, the department of justice gave
warning to local authorities every-
where that if the radical elements
were to be kept under control every
aw enforcing agency, state, and fed-
ral, must be awake and equal to the
Langers read and fancied.

I

SONORA AMERICANS'
TOLD TO PAY TAXES

i x t r

FUEL AND IGHTING
COND ITION BETTER

Washington,, A;'brll 30.-Americans
doing buisness in the state of Sonora
and other parts of Mexico controlled
by the revolutionists have been au-
thorized to pay taxes and customs
duties to the de facto authorities. This
authorization, it was explained today
at the state department, is in accord-
ance with a recognized principal of
international law and does not
amount to recognition of the de facto
government. Inability of the recog-
nized government of Mexico to collect
duties and customs held by -the rev-
olutionists, it was said, cannot be per-
mitted to interfere with the regular
commercial transactions.
The state department received an
exhaustive report of conditions in
Vera Cruz from an American in that
city. The report states that warships
should be kept in readiness for dis-
patch to Vera Cruz. Although the
city was said to be quiet, possibilities
of trouble there w'ere described as
great. Officials for various parts of
Mexico indicate a growth of the rev- r
olutionary movement.

Local Companies Receive Sufficlent
Coal for Three Day Run at
Full Capacity.
RESTRICTIONS ON DISPLAY
LIGHTING STILL IN EFFECT
-~ i
Although the coal situation still re-
mains acute, enough fuel has been red
ceived by the Detroit-Edison company
and the Washtenaw Gas com*.ny to
allow them to furnish a normal'supply
of gas and electricity' to the city to-
day; tomorrow and Monday. Officials
of both companies stated that they
culd give no assurances as to wheth-
er a normal supply could be furnished
after Monday.
"I received word today that the
company will put on full power Sat-
urday morning," stated Mr. Herbert
Silvester, local manager of the De-
troit-Edison company yesterday after-
noon. "This does not mean that re-
strictions on windw display and elec-
tric signs have been lifted. The ban
on these will continue until further
notice."

L I TS NOMINATE
MEN FOR COUNCIL
Eight nominees for the Student
council were chosen by the Junior lit
class at its meeting yesterday after-
noon.
The men chosen were: Joseph
Avery, Earl Boxell, Fitzhugh Brewer,
George Duffield, Harcourt Johnston,
Edward Kingsford, Richard Losch,
and Donald Thorp. These names will
appear on the ballot for the All-cam-
pus elections, at which time four of
the men will be elected to the coun-
cil.
Philip Foley was elected class track
manager and will have charge of the
team during the intramural contests
this spring.

REBENTS REFUSE TO INCLUDE CLASS
DUES WITH TUITION; TABLE' PETIT/OFRFE PEHIU~l0~~

ENIERN 'SOCIETY.
PREPARTIONS FINISHEDi

Six men were nominated for the Stu-
dent council at a meeting of the sopho-
more lits yesterday.
The following nominees are to be
voted on at the All-campus election
May 12: C. Atkinson, W. Hender-
son, C. Murchison, T. Sargent, R.
Sherwood, and H. Wilson.
Selection of a captain and six lieu-
tenants for the Spring games were al-
so made, as follows: S. Broome, cap-
tain, and L. Leader, W. Michaels, M.
Newton, R. Peare, C. Pearman, and L.
Rennell, lieutenants.
Nicholas E. Lacy was chosen class
track manager.
RORIALBOARD
NOMINEES SELECTED

PAILY HONORS PRESIDENT ,
Honoring the retiring. head of
the University, The Mi:chigan
Daily has devoted practically
the entire second section of this
Sunday's issue to President
Harry Burns Hutchins.
A complete biography, a re-
sume of his career as President j
of the University, together with
many sidelights on his life are
included in the section.
A half-tone portrait of Presi-
dent Hutchins when he first as-
sumed the leadership of the Un-
iversity administration is fea-
tured on the page.
UPSETS FEATURE 'FIRST.
DAY OF. PENN RELAYS
ENGLAND'S STAR RUNNER BADLY
BEATEN BY NEW ENG-
LAND MEN
(By Associated Press)
Philadelphia, April 30.- A new
world's record, the defeat of Eng-
land's best collegiate distance run-
ners, three teams including Oxford-
Cambridge men being left at the post
in the star race, and the winning of
pentathlon by Bradley of the Univer-
sity of Kansas were the outstanding
features of the opening day of the

ASSISTANT TO DB. BURTON A
DIRECTOR OF NEW DORMI.
TORY SELECTED
NUMEROUS FACULTY
APPOINTMENTS MAE
Board Acknowledges Gifts and Awai
Fellowships, Veasey Tendered
Vote of Thanks
Denial of the Student council's :
tition' that class dues be incorpor
ed in the yearly tuition fee was
corded by the Board of Regents
its meeting yesterday on 1
grounds that class dues covered
tivities of a purely social nature p
taining to each class and not to I
University as a whole. The'abseu
of three Regents at the meeting cat
ed the postponement until the nq
meeting, May 28, of all discussion
the petition presented by the Stude
council in regard to the freedom
political speeches in Hill auditoriu
This is the second time that the pe
tion has",been tabled.
At #the request of President-el(
Burton the Board appointed Mr. Osc
L. Buhr as assistant to the preside
his iticumbency to begin July 1. N
Buhr is at present holding such a p
sition under Dr. Burton at the Ui
versity of Minnesota.
Betsy Barbour Director Named
Miss Eleanor Sheldon, at present
graduate student at Bryn Mawr, w

SUSPECTS ARRESTED
aicago, April 30.-Federal, state,
city forces tonight were prepar-
* combat any overt act that might
r out of the various demonstra-g
s planned for tomorrow in cele-
ion of May day.
Xty suspects were rounded up by
police today in a continuation of
drive which resulted in the ar-
of more than 300 men and sev-
women .last night.
ige quantities of radical literature
distributed throughout the west
today.
serting that a May day bomb plot
announced by Attorney-General
ter "was manufactured in hi§ own
l," the national socialists commit-
asserted that whatever disorder
.t occur tomorrow would be caus-
by the insane and criminal dis-
ry of Mr. Palmer's dime novel"
cialists were advised "to carry out
plans for meeting and to refuse
stampeded by the anarchist out-
STRIKE CALLED
ris, April 30.-- A general strike
rench labor has been called to
May 1.
e call was decided by the Gen-
Federation of Labor when it
i its hand had been forced by
iction of the railway federation
alling a general railway strike
day Day. Thus, against what is
red to be the judgment of the
ng labor leaders, the issue be-
1 organized labor and the gov-
ent seems about to be fought,
PRODUCTION WILL BRING
PRESSION, DECLARES COOLEY,

DRAFT, OF NEW CONSTITUTION
POSTED; NOMINATIONS
MADE
A new constitution for the Engi-
neering society and the nomina-
tion of officers for next year have
been completed by the committee
formed for the purpose of reorganiz-
ing the society. The constitution and
nominations will be submitted to the
engineering students at the All-cam-
pus election May 12.
Copies of the proposed constitution
will be posted on the Engineering so-
ciety bulletin board and in the Tech-
nic office so that the students may
familiarize themselves with its con-
tents.Among the proposed changes
are provisions to the effect that mem-
bers of the branch engineering
organizations automatically become
members of the Engineering society;
and that tlie activities of the society
will be' governed by an executive
board composed of one representative
from each branch'society, the manag-
ing editor and business manager of the
Technic, and the office:rs of the Engi-
neering society. The purpose of the
society will be to conduct affairs of
common interest to all engineers, such
as the engineering exhibit, lectures by
prominent speakers, smokers, and so-
cial functions.
The nominatiofns were made by. a
committee composed of one represen-
tative from each branch society, the
managing editor and business mana-
ger of the Technic and the officers of
the present Engineering society and
are as follows:
For president-C. N. Johnston, '21E,
and S. N. Lawson, '21E.
For vice-president-H. N. Anderson,
'20E, and L. A. Gaines, '211.
For secretary-M. B. Covell, '21E,
and F. R. Storer, '21E.
For treasurer--R. P. Dillon, '21E,
and M. E. McGowan, '21E.

Little Improvement
Mr. Silvester returned yesterday
from Lansing, and remarked that the
coal situation showed little improve-
ment.
Mr. Henry W. Douglass, '90, presi-
dent of the Washtenaw Gas company,
said yesterday that the company
would be in position to furnish the
factories a 'full 'supply of gas today
and Monday.
ik-Up Expected
"The coal that we now have on
hand and the pick-up due to occur
over Sunday will enable us to satis-
fy the needs of the factories and also
keep a supply available for home use."
Gas in the factories has been shut
off since Wednesday. Action of the
interstate commerce commissiar in
clearing the rails for coal shipment is
expected to relieve the situation about-
the first of next week.
Ann Arbor frlovie
To Be Mrade Soon
Within two weeks the Tisdale Indus-
trial Film company will begin ope-
rations on a motion picture of Ann
Arbor. The film will include scenes
of the University,- the court house,
schools, churches,7and other places of
interest. A similar film, 5,000 feet in
length, of Ohio State university and
Columbus has recently been complet-
ed by the same company.
G. W. Fippen, district manager of
the company, is now. in Ann Arbor
looking over the city preparatory to
making the film. A complete studio
outfit will be used. About 20 men
will be employed by the company, and
from one to two weeks time will, be
necessary to make the picture.
Arrangements have already been
made to have the fibs show at a lo-
cal theater within about two weeks
after the filming has been completed.
PHI BETA KAPPA ELECTION
DATA IN COMMITTEE'S HANDS

ADDITIONAL NAMES MAY
PLACED ON BALLOT BY
PETITION

BE)

Nominations for the various offices
of the oratorical board were made
yesterday at a meeting of the nomin-
ating committee. The names will be
voted on at the All-campus election,
May 12. Anyone desiriig to make ad-
ditions to the list of nominees may do
so by petitioning the board before the
ballot goes to press on Monday.: The
nominations are as follows:
For president-J. W. Hindis, '21,
James K. Pollock, '22, and C.. M.
Youngjohn, '22.
For vice-president--Winefred Bieth-
an, '21, Earle Miles, '21, and Preston
H. Scott, '23.
For treasurer-Leon Grubaugh; '22,
Roy Lounsbury, '22, and William Mes-
senger, '21.
For secretary-Rebecca Condon,
'22, and Olive Smith, '21.
For delegates, at large, eight to be
elected: Gladys Boughton, '22, Earle
F. Boxell, '21, Carl 'Brandt, '22L,
Euphemia Carnahan, '22, Leland Galt,
'22, Carolyn F. Hayes, '21, Aurelia
Igel, '21, Helen Middleswart, '22, Ed-
ward Ramsdell, '23, Telford Rygh, '21,
Donald Scott, '22, Margaret Stone, '22,
William Wachs, '21, Harold Warner,
'21, and David Watts, '21.
COOLEY CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS;
HOLDS FINAL TRIAL OF YEAR
The following officers were elected'
at a meeting of the Cooley club held
last Thursday: President, I. Jen-
nings, '22L; 'vice-president, F. D.
Carroll, '22L; secretary-treasurer, D.
H. Drake, "22L; and sheriff, J. M.'
Durbin, '22L. ,
The. last jury trial of the year,
Clark vs. the D. U. R. company, re-
sulted in 10 cents damages being.
awarded the plaintiff.
FRESHMAN TALKS TO CONTINUE;
PROF. FRIDAY NEXT SPEAKER

,<

University of Pennsylvania
carnia here today-.

Relay

made director of
mitory. She will'

Betsy Barbour do
occupy her new pc

Heavy Rain Hurts
The presence of the English univer-
sities' track team gave an internation-
al aspect to the game, and, but for
heavy rain and the unfortunate fiasco
which ruined the distance medley
championship race the initial day of
the meet would have gone down in
athletic history as one of the most-
successful in the long carnival rec-
ords.
Fast Runners Start
The fastest field of distance runners
that the country could boast faced the
starter in the intercollegiate race ar-
ranged for the benefit of E. A. Mon-
thau of Oxford, winner of this event
in the Oxford-Cambridge meet in
London in March, when his time was
14:43 3-5. Today he was easily de-
feated by E. T. Nighingale of New
Hampshire college by more than 40
yards in 14:56.
DEANS' CONFERENCE ENDS WITH
ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION
A round table discussion on a va-
riety of . administrative problems
brought the conference of deans to a
close yesterday at the Union.
Salary scales, ways of increasing
the supply of university instructors,
new departures in university admin-
istration, the honor system, new re-
quirements for graduatidn, and the
probable enrollments for the coming
year were considered.
FUNERAL OF WILLIAM CONDON
TO BE HELD THIS AFTERNOON
William Condon, aged 89, a resident
of Ann Arbor since 1877, is dead at his.
home, 920 South University avenue.
Funeral services will be held at 4
o'clock this afternoon in St. Andrew's
church. He is survived by five child-
ren, seven grand-children and two
great-grandchildren.
CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO, FALLS IN
HANDS OF REVOLUTIONISTS
Agua Prieta, Sonora, April 30. -
Chihuahua city is definitely in the
hands of the revolutionists it was an-
nounced by General Callez tonight..
Chihuahua icty is one of the largest
cities in northern Mexico. It has a,
population of approximately 40,000.
CAPS AND GOWNS WILL NOT BE
WORN AT PURDUE GRADUATION

sition when the completed building
opens next fall.
The Regents confirmed the appoint-
ment of Dean Fred J. Kelly, of the
school of education at the University
of Kansas, as professor of educational
administration and assistant director
of educational research.
Approval was granted the plan of
the local Rotary club to tax each mem-
ber $2 to provide a child welfare
worker in both the University and
Homoeopathic hospitals.
Veasey Thanked
Mr. James A. Veasey, '02L, general
counsel of the Carter Oil company,
Tulsa, Okla., was tendered a vote of
thanks for giving a recent series of
eight lectures on legal work among
oil holdings. Mr. Veasey delivered the
lectures entirely at his own expense,
receiving not even travelling expens-
es from the University. His eight lec-
tures are being published in the Law
Review and he is planning to deliver
a series of 10 lectures along similar
topics at the University next year.
The Board made him a non-resident
lecturer in the Law school.
Dr. A. H. Ruthven announced gifts
of $100 from Mr. Bradshaw Swales of
Washington, D. C., and the same
amount from Dr. W. W. Newcomb of
Detroit, the entire sum to be used for
publication of museum papers. Other
gifts acknowledged were one of $300
each from both Mr. Philip and David
Gray of Detroit to be devoted to arch-
eological work in Egypt. Prof. Fran-
cis Kelsey, who is at present in Egypt
doing research work for the Univer-
sity, is an intimate friend of the
Grays. His leave of absence was ex-
tended another year.
Additional Gifts
Mrs. Theodore Buhl and Mr. Law-
rence' Buhl of Detroit sent a check
for $600 to continue the Buhl Classi-
cal fellowship. A gift of a valuable
pair of Chinese pendant vases was ac-
cepted from Dr. T. J. Ritter of Ann
Arbor.
Among appointments to the faculty
was that of Mr. A. B. Peck of the
Bureau of Standards at Washington,
D. C., as assistant professor of min-
eralogy. Mr. C. B. Corral was named
to succeed Mr. R. H. Bonilla as in-
structor in Spanish. Mr. Bonilla will
return. to Spain following the close
of college. All appointments will take
effect next fall.
No changes were made in the per-
sonnel of the Board in Control of Ath-

That the present depressing finan-
al condition of the country is due
non-productive industries was the
inion expressed by Dean M. E.
oley, of the engineering college, in
a address before the junior engin-
rs at their class meeting yester-
y. He said that he believed the
untr must necessarily. go through
period of trouble and unrest but
at there were no reasons to be pessi-
stic as to the eventual outcome. He
>red the profiteers and attributed to
em partial responsibility for the ex-
ing abnormal prices.
During the business session of the
ss meeting, the river trip, schedul-
for today, was postponed indefinite-
due to the prevailing inclement
ather.
'he results of the election on mem-
s of the honor committee and for
ident councilmen could not be ob-
ned, up to the time of going to
ss.
ACHERS ASKED TO AID
IN DANDELION CAMPAIGN
setters are being sent out from
office of the commissioner of
ools .to the teachers of the state,
ing them to aid in a dandelion
npaign. School children will be
d for common dandelion seed col-

MICHIGAN GRAD
TO LECTURE HERE
"Pictures of Chinese Life" will be
the subject of an illustrated lecture
by Dr. W. H. Newman, '08M, at anr
open meeting of the Student Volun-
teers at 7:45 o'clock tonight in Lane
hall.' He will talk at 11:50 o'clock
Sunday morning at the Baptist guild,
and at 7:30 o'clock that evening at
the Baptist church, he will describe
his Red Cross work in Siberia.
Dr. Newman, who was engaged for
several years in medical missionary
service in China, is to be here until
Monday. Students desiring to have
conferences with him may call 1010-M.
SENIOR AND JUNIOR HONORARY
SOCIETIES HOLD TWO DANCES

Returns have been received regard--
ing the lists of graduates and seniors
for faculty action on election to Phi
Beta Kappa and complete data is now
in the hands of the tabulating com-
mittee.
Announcement of elections to mem-
bershi~p in the honorary fraternity,
will be made immediately following
ac meeting of its members, to be held
in about two weeks, it was stated
yesterday.
PROFESSOR REFUSES TO TEACH
FUR-COATED FEMALES; QUITS
A Chicago university professor has
resigned his position, giving for his
reasonf his unwillingness to teach
women who wear fur coats costing
more than the amount of his year's
salary.
SINGER PITCHES FIRST BALL
IN MICHIGAN-INDIANA GAME

Prof. David Friday will address the
freshman lits at 3 o'clock Monday aft-
ernoon at Hill auditorium. The talks
to freshmen which had been postpon-
ed on account of the repairs in Uni-
versity Hall, will continue, beginning
Monday, until examinations.
SHORTAGE OF PIN SETTERS
STOPS, BOWLING AT UNION
The Michigan Union bowling alleys
have been closed temporarily. It has
been difficult for some time to secure
pin boys, and with the arrival of an
occasional fair day no boys show up
for pin-setting.
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
RAISES REGISTRATION FEES
A $10 increase yin registration fees
per semester has been voted at the
University of Illinois.

Honorary societies of the senior and
junior classes held spring dances last
night, the formal Barristers-Vulcans-
Druids affair being held in the par-
lors of Barbour gymnasium and the
Sphinx-Triangle party at the Ann Ar-
bor Golf club.
There were about 40 couples pres-
ent at each of the dances, where Phil
Diamond played for the seniors and,
Sandy Wilson for the juniors.

At the recent baseball game played
between Michigan and Indiana at
Bloomington, Madame Schumann-
Heink threw the first ball. She was
in Bloomington for a concert in the
evenjng.

letics, and the present board will
There will be no caps and gowns tinue in office for the ensuing ye,
worn by the seniors at the commence- Announcement was made of
ment - exercises at Purdue this year, awarding of fellowships in the 9
according to a vote of the students. uate school for the year 1920-2:

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