100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 29, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-IGAN DAILY

Monday during the Univer-
Student Publications.
:)CIATED PRESS
vely entitled to the use for
redited to it or not otherwise
news published therein.
Arbor+ Michigan, as second
$3.50.
g, Maynard street.
1 2414-
00 words, if signed, the sig-
print, but as an evidence of
uiished inThe Daily a*t the
mailed, to The Daily office,
no consideration. No man
writer incloses postage.
endorse the sentiments e x
ot be received',after 8 o'clock

* The state universities have many problems pe-
culiar to their own conditions, which can well be
considered and solved in friendly meetings of this
sort. Our interests are one with those of the um-
versities our guests represent and in this confer-
ence of deans the neighborly spirit and co-opera-
tion which the-true situation demands ' are best
brought out.
Happily, Michigan's progress has never been
more in evidence than at the present, when our new
buildings are ready for inspection, our enrollment
at its height, and the coming administrative change
giving promise of continued advance and new
ideas.
We are glad that our distinguished guests will see
us at our best; but, above all, we are gratified that
they are here and that we..may' extend our greet-
ings and our hospitalify.

TEXT BOOKS for EC. 32-B O.&IV
T&Shaw's Approach to BusinessPoblms
AT

.

TWO
STORES

BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

/ "I

........HARRY M.-CAREY

sin

H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
..Renaud Sherwood
.John I. Dakin
. Brewster Campbell
.Robert C. Angel
~.Marguerite Clark
omas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Winefred Biethan
y Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer
E~dna Apel
L. P. Lovejoy
Charles Murchison
Russell Fletcher

AVIATION AS A COLLEGE SPORT
The statement that the war has been responsible,
for enormous changes in national conditions, occu-
pations and ways of living is so often repeated that
it smacks of triteness. Yet the greatly altered state
of present day living is almost daily manifesting it-
self to such an extent that the statement is as in-
evitable as a remark about the weather. (
Aeronautics is a case in point. No stretch o'f
memory is required to recall the day a few years
ago when the appearance of an airplane in flight
practically stopped traffic on the streets. But the
war changed that. To most of us the airplane be-.
came such a common sight during 1918 and 1919
that it scarcely merited more attention than a high
priced automobile.
This year has seen aeronautics developed to a
tremendous extent in every direction. Planes are
being used for passenger and commercial service,
and luxurious aerial limousines are being turned
out for privte use.'
But the growth in popularity of the airplane has
come even closer. A large number of college stu-
dents who were in the aviation service during the'
war have maintained their interest in thesport by
the formation of aeronautical societies at Michigan
as well as at most of the eastern and many of the
mid-western universities.
Michigar4 already has a privately owned plane
and it is expected that the' aeronautical club will
also have a machine for theiir use. The ?Aichigan
club iiAends to enter some of the many aviation'
meets which will be held throughout the country
during the next 'few months. Considering the in-
terest in and the growth of the sport, it is not too'
much to expect aviation to take its place among
other college sports within the next few years.

E. CHOLETTE

A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
.Hienry Whiting
..ward Prieha
P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan
D. P. Joyce
.dter Robt. om nerville
Lester W. Millard.
igs
ion oncerning news for any
editor, who has full charge
veek will be: Monday
uesday night, Edgar
McManis ; Thursday
ay night, Mark Ehl-
A. Bernstein.
L 29, 1920.
ADVERTISING
last possible ounce of
act, that is one of the
in our goods," stated
chants yesterday in
wearing old clothes.
:e prices but the aver-
n the best, which he
ced," he continued.
ail clothiers and tail-
discriminated against
and some have even
retaliate by reducing
nns of The Daily.
similar to that of the
The old clothes, move-
and in most localities
)n of the business men
ver to reduce the price
s not directed primar-
--he probably is not
n he did when prices
.terpreted as a general

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, xgxg)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:zo a.
m., and hourly to 9:io p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann 'Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:os a. m., 9::es a.
,m. arzd every two hours to g os p. M., o:5o
o. mn. To Ypsilanti only, z z:t~ p. mn., 110o
a. m.. and to Saline, change at Ypuilanti.
Ypsilanti,
Local Cars West Bouh--y:48 a. m. and
t2:20 a. m.
YOU WANT
PHOTOGRAPHS
You Will Be Proud Of
SPEDDING STUDIO
Guarantees That Kind.
JMagazine Review
The April number of the Michigan
Alumnus which appeared this week
features the Union and contains a
number of interesting articles about
its activities.
The leading article "The Union As
a Center of University Life," is writ-
ten by George L. Hurley, '18L, gener-
al secretary of the Union. It discuss-
es the organization, the state of its
finances, and the relation of the build-
ing to the University.
An unsigned article entitled "The
Union-the Building," is a description
of the various features of .the build-
ing. Irving K. Pond, '79E, one of its
architects, is the author of the article,
"The Message of the Union Building."
He piscusses and interprets its sym-
bolism. All three of these articles
dealing with the Uniion are illustrated
with cuts showing many parts of the
building.
The Alumnus also prints a letter
from Mr. George Parker Winship, lib-
rarian of Harvard university, to Prof.'
Claude H. Van Tyne of the history de-
partment, in which he congratulates
the University upon its receipt of the
gift of Regent William H. 'Clements',
collection of historical American
books.
Besides these articles there are the
usual departments and the reunion
program.
Announce Ticket Sale for Party
Tickets for the Architects May
party are scheduled to go on sale this
week, according to an announcement
made by the committee in charge.
Flowers, it 'was further announced,
are not to be permitted on the dance'
floor.
The Daily's specialty Is 'serviec to
evoryone.-Adv.

IENGRAVI1NG
Orders for Engraving requirer
than usual. Leave your order
,VISITING CARE
Plate-and $1.00 cards $3.00
UNIV
WW' BOO
i1111tilllll mifillllllll lI 1111mll ll'111111111111111

ERSITY
DKSTORES

more time
r card for

A noted librarian says:
- ' "I don't know how it is with other people,
but my memorizing is mental-picturing."
Do not regard mental-picturing skeptically. The chances are you don't
comprehend it. It does improve concentration, attention, mental association
of one thing with another-you begin tp see things-the power of memory
grows--thought, analysis, comprehension grow. "Memory and Concentration,"
(a new booklet). Twenty exercises for mental improvement. d
Students' Edition, 6oc, at all bookstores.
Or by mail with type-written letter of instruction, $i.
The Education courses,. Box 98, Ann Arbo
UNIVERSITY OF

DS

ORDER
NOW

and up

MICHIGAN

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN HARRY B. HUTCHINS, LL.D., President
t o

tom.,

r

TIhe Telescope

Cosmopolitan Student Community
Eight Schools and Colleges

Calling Mr. Edu'ards
We don't care who
The White House gets,
So long as he
Is for the "wets."
. The All-Healing Medicine
'Stude-I'd like to get some alcohol, sir. I've
just sprained my wrist.
Chem 'lab instructor-Is that so? By the way
you 'didn't sprain your throat the other day, did,
you ?
Stude-No, sir. Why do you ask? .
C. L. I.-Why, I just happened to see you drink-
ing so'ne of it.
The March of the Classes
Like takes to like, the wise men say,
The grass is green, the Freshmen, too,
. And that is why he makes his wayf
Across the places which are taboo.
The Sophomore in his new found liberty
Has no belief in signs,
And that is why he walks with glee
Around the "PLEASE" that at his feet re-
clines.
The Junior always has his dIate
With the fair one of his heart,
And as he cannot e'er be late
He, too, from the sidewalks doth depart.

COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS-JOHN R.. EFFINGER, Dean.
Full literary and scientific courses-Teachers' course-Higher commercial course-Course
in insurance-Course in forestry-Course 'in landscape design-All courses open to pro-
fessional students on approval of Faculty.
COLLEGES OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE, MORTIMER E. COOLEY, Dean.
Complete courses in civil, mechanical, electrical, naval, and chemical engineering-Aroli-
tecture and architectural engineering-Highway engineering-Technical work under in-
structors of professional experience-Work-shop, experimental, and field practice-Me-
chanical, physical, electrical, and chemical laboratories-Fine new building-Central heat-
Ing and lighting plants adapted for instruction./
MEDICAL SCHOOL, V. C. VAUGHAN, Dean. Four years' graded course-Highest
standard for all work-Special attention given to laboratory teaching-Modern laboratories
-Ample clinical facilities-Bedside instr-uction in hospital, entirely under University con-
trol, a special feature.
LAW SCHOOL, 'HENRY M. BATES, Dean. Three years' course-'Practice court work
a specialty--Special facilities for work in history and political sciences.
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, HENRY KRAMER, Dean,. Two, three, and four years'
courses-Ample laboratory facilities-Training for prescription service, mnufacturing
pharmacy, industrial chemistry, and for the work of the analyst.
HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL SCHOOL, W. B. HINSDALE, Dean.. Full four years'
course-Fully equipped hospital, tirely under University control-Especial attention given
to materia medica and scientific prescribing-Twenty hours' weekly clinical instruction.
COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY, MARCus L. WARD, Dean. Four years' course-
Modern building housing ample laboratories, clinical rooms, library, and lecture room-
Clinical material in. excess' of needs.
GRADUATE SCHOOL, ALED H. LLOYD, Dean. Graduate courses in all departments
Special courses leading to the higher professional degrees.
SUMMER SESSION, E. H. KRAus, Dean. A regular session of the University afford-
ing credit toward degrees. More than -275 courses in arts, engineering, medicine, law,
pharmacy, and library methods.
For full information (Catalogues, Announcements of the various Schools and Col-
leges, Campus Guide Book, etc., or matters of individual inquiry) address Deans of
Schools and Colleges, or the Secretary of the University.

I

SHIRLEY W. SMITH,

p.

.

have increased
ir space with ad-
thing and cloth-
Jity and wearing
;oon squashed in
t tended to raise
essary attire and
y long. It was
f old clothes and

continues to soar there are
ty students now contribut-
fits of the Ann Arbor mer-
able to return next yea ,
not appear as well dressed
ime that The Daily has'
uilt of news and campaigns
As a result of the articles
ity of the moving picture
arged at the theaters in the
pus' these theaters retaliated
ising. But a noticeable im-
in the class , of pictures
>f superfluous material and
om the programs.
s attempted to conduct its
nns free from the influence

The Senior on his way to class
Thinks not of an earthy thing,
And thus he wanders o'er the grass
While his thoughts are on the wing.

And now 'tis of the .co-ed
I would with you converse,
She romps upon the grass, 'tis said,
Because she's born perverse.
P. B.K..
Dear' Noah: -
When did Tennyson write "Britons, Hold Your
Own?" Lit Student.
While we are not sure of this, we think he wrote
that one day while crossing the English Channel.
First stude-Gee, I wished I owned the School
of Music. I'd make a fortune out of it.
Second ditto-Huh. What would you do, charge
people to hear the students practice?
First-No, charge them for having the students
quit practicing.

, ,
. ., -'"
9 ,'
.1
ti fr// '
i
I i ,
. 4 /
y
* II r
1
. t {
I
i
7
i
,
" y o

IT'S GOOD BUSINESS TO WEA
THE KIND OF CLOTHING
WE SELL
The busy world-sizes up a man at first
glance. It's a case of first impression be-
ing the most lasting. This fact is being
recognized more and more each day.
Clothes are one of man's most valuable
assets-especially

9:

1 -

Hart Schaffner & Marx
*Spring Suits

All our regular customers will be glad to know that we
are ready for spring. 'To those of you who are our pros-
pective customers we call attention tothis fact and assure
you that our policy is to sell you goods of the best quality
'at a moderate range of price.

DEANS
)eral arts cc

I

ges of
nce to-
a sin-

Aeu,,COnin, Tie
Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx
Southwest' Corner of Main and Washington Sti

Pamous Closing Lines
"He's very rash," he muttered as

i

he gazed at

the boy with the measles.

0

A

'OAH COUNT.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan