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April 29, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAlY AIND
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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL . 29, 1920.

PRICE THR

" ' ' ir rr+r w+ + i .. ILA i m r r - .:
- -

" o

TICKETS ON SALE
FOR "L'AMI FRITZ"
FRENCH CLUB PLAY

lULII
TRIKE
S VIOLA-
NAL
IE MEN
E OFFER
se Approxi-
De~ne

clated Press)
pril 28.-Indictments
n of the Labor Act
e government against
ilroad strike' in the
let, according to an
ade tonight by As-
trict Attorney C. 13.
e of an investigation
ucting into transpor-
e.
pril 28. - Assistant
I Ames' was given
andle the New York
when he left to in-
ons there, Attorney
said tonight. Mr.
Enmunicated with the
'ustice and officials
it information from
Lssing the govern-
action.
ril 28.-Represe'nta-
racite mine workers
operators that their
a wage increase ap-
>er 'cent is rejected,'
tccept their proposal
coording to a state-
tonight by the sub-
ated to negotiate a
ent for the hard coal

Tickets will go on sale today at
Graham's for "L'Ami Fritz," Erck-
mann-Chatrian's three act French
comedy to be presented by the Cer-
cle Francais Monday night in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.
"L'Ami Fritz" is considered one of
the best plays, particularly with re-
spect to cleverness of dialogue, ever
presented by the French society.
Written about the period immediately
following the Franco-Prussian war, it
contains hints of the spirit of that
time. The author, through his char-
acters, pleads for activity rather
than slothfulness; and the underlying
thought is that the French should not
allow themselves to be misled by ma-
terialism but should held to a high
ideal of patriotism.
The original music from the score
of the first performance has been ob-
tained for the presentation, and the
chorus of reapers and gleaners whose
singing is a feature of the play will
be composed of members of the Var-
sity and Girls' Glee clubs trained by
Prof. Earl Moore.
.E U
Will SPEAK HERE~
Dean Marquis to Address Next Uni-
versity Religious Services; Sec.
of Welfare Dept.
EIGHT NEW MEl1WBERS ELECTED
TO COMMITTEE ON SERVICES
Dean S. S. Marquis, executive secre-
tary of the Industrial Welfare de-
partment of the Ford Motor company,
Detroit, and formerly head of St.
Paul's cathedral of that city, will be
the speaker at the next University
Union religious services to be held at
6:30 o'clock Sunday, May 9, in Hill
auditorium, according to an announce-
ment by Secretary Evans of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A.
Dean Marquis is in direct charge,
after Mr. Ford, of all industrial rela-
tions of the Ford company. He is al-
so the head of the Ford company's de-
partment of education. The subject of"
Dean Marquis' address has not yet'
been given out. Mr. Russell Carter
willehave charge of the musical pro-
gram and Robert F. Grindley, '21E,
will preside.
The following new members have
been elected to the University serv-
ice committee: Walter S. Reiss, '21,
Fred J. Petty, '21, Richard C. Losch,
'21E, Chesser M. Campbell, '21, Rob-
ert F. Grindley, '21E, Marcella Moon,
'21, Marguerte Clark, '21, and Lois
DeVries, '21.

l

DRIE LAlUNCHEDU
BY Y1ICIAII TO 9MO
FUNDS TO BE RAISED FOR WORK
OF DR. CLARA SARGENT
IN CHINA
GIANT THERMOMETERS
TO REGISTER PROGRESS
Data Concerining Campaign Given Out
to Workers at Dinner Last
Night

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS' NOTICE
Managing editors and business managers of The Michigan Daily,
Michiganensian, Gargoyle, Chimes, Students' Directory, Athletic pro-
gram, the managing editor of the Wolverine and any other publica-
tion officers needed, will be.appointed for the ensuing year by the
Board in Control of Student Publications on Saturday, May 8, 1920.
Applications for any of these positions will be received by the
Board at any time prior to the day of said meeting. Applications
and recommendations should be addressed to the chairman of the
Board, Prof. F. N. Scott, and may be mailed or handed to him or may
be filed with Miss Allen at the Board office at the Press building.
The . Board rules relative to appointments are as follows:
Sec. 3. On or before the first day of May of each year, the man-
aging editor and business manager of each of the publications under
the control of this Board, shall recommend, by letter to the chair-
man of this Board, members of their staffs to fill the positions of
managing editor and business manager respectively. The letters
of recommendation shall set forth the names of the men on the staff
1consigiered available ,for the place, their qualifications and terms of
service on the publications in question and the reasons for choosilg
the preson receiving the highest recommendation before the others.'
Sec. 4. At any time before the date set for the .appoittment. of
the business manager and managing editor of publication or pub-
lications under the control of this Board, any student in the Univer-
sity may make application for either position by letter addressed to
the chairman of this Board, setting forth the experience and qualifi-
cations of the applicant for the position sought. All such applica-.
tions will be considered by this Board at' the time of making the
appointments.
E. R. SUNDERLAND,
Business Manager of the Board
in Control of Student Publications.
' p

ATTEMPT
LOCAL

MADE TO
SHORTAGE
WAY

One hundred seventy-five Univer-
sity women will launch today the Y.
W. C .A. campaign to supgort Dr.!
Clara M. Sargent, '15M, in China in
order that she may organize the Wom-
en's Public Health campaign there,
plans for which are now under way.
Progress to Be Marked
Progress of the campaign will be
registered on a huge thermometer
which hangs in Newberry hall, and
also on .smaller thermometers which
are placed in various buildings on
the campus. The thermometers will
break at the $1,700 mark.,
Full data regarding the work which
Dr. Sargent is about to undertake was
given the campaign workers last night
at a supper in Newberry hall. Talks
were given by Mrs. Katherine W. Ed-
dy, of the National Y. W. C. A. board,
Miss Bertha Conde, national secre-
tary, and Dean Myra B. Jordan.
in, speaking of the campaign Miss
Conde said, "Michigan 1has a big
concrete chance to have a real in-
fluence on international peace and
good will through a representative like
Dr. Sargent in China. Coming in touch
as she does with women, girls, and
leaders of education throughout the
entire nation, she has unusual oppor-
tunity for embodying the finest things
in the spirit of Michigan and making
them real to China.
Hopes for Support of All
"It is through personalities like this
that Michigan can work directly with
other nations. I hope every student
in Michigan is big enough in his
thinking to have some share in the
financial backing of Dr. Sargent."
Friday Night Set
F or BJ.V. D. Party
Barristers, Vulckns and Druids will
revel Friday night at Barbour gymna-
sium. For five hours, beginning
promptly at 9 and ending more or less
promptly at 2, the laws, engineers, and
the lits will lay aside all enmity and
don-no, not"B. V. D.'s, in spite of the
dance's monicker, but evening dress.
The committee, C.' . Patterson,
'20L, H. N. Collins, '20E, and Harry
Sunley, '22L, announces that the nec-
essary jazz will be furnished by Phil
Diamond's sip piece orchestra. Chap-
erons will be Prof. Grover C. Gris-
more and lgrs. Grismore, Prof. Mor-
ris P. Tilley and Mrs. Tilley, Prof.
James H. Cissel and Mrs. Cissel.
PROFS. SPEAK AT
PHARMIC -DINNER

ELECTRI CITY
BEING GENEI
BY WATER

IBu letin

Antwerp, April 28.-Americans won

second
contest
tonight

place in the Olympic hockey
by defeating the Jugo-Slaves
by a score ,16-to0 :The Am-

ericans scored almost at will.
will receive' a prize tonight.

They

ANNOUNCE PRORMFOR
UCONFERENCIE OFI DEANS
Deans from the liberal arts colleges
of 12 state universities will meet in
their annual conference today and
Friday at the Union.
To PresentDiscussions,
Among the subjects which have
been assigned to be discussed .are, "A
Required Course in Civilization for
Freshmen," led by Dean B. P. Boyd
of the University of Kentucky. "Pros-
pective Changes in the Requirements
for Graduation," will be discussed by
Dean G. C. Sellery of the University
of Wisconsin. Dean G. F. Kay of the
University of Iowa will speak on "The
Prospective Supply of College Teach-
ers."
Word was received by Dean John R.
(See Number 2. Page Six)
"Hedda Gabler"'

RZlICKA LOSES
I NO HIT, SAME 3-
Western State Normal Team Conquers
Wolverines by Dint of Varsity's
Errors in Eig4th
NORMAL HURLER HOLDS MICH.
BATTERS TO PAIR OF SINGLES
Pitching- a no hit game against the
Kalamazoo Normal nine yesterday aft-
ernoon Ruzicka lost a pitching duel
with Freeman, the Normal twirler,
when a series of errors by the Wolver-
ines in the eighth inning allowed
three Kalamazoo runners to cross the
plate.
Not since the days of Sisler has a
,prettier game been played. The score
was nothing to nothing for seven inn-
ings, with the Wolverine atfack a tri-
fle the stronger. . In the seventh frame
Lundgren's men threatened. when
Perrin singled and went to second
when the Kalamazoo left . gardner
failed to recover tie ball. Shorty
Mraz. came to bat with the stands
cheering. Mraz was passed. Karpus
struck out after fouling some long
ones. Weadock, batting for Newell,
walked and the Wolverine chances

RESTRICTIONS ON
STILL ARE IN El
University Laboratories Face
Down Unless Condito
Improve Much
"Ann Arbor is now generat
tricity by water power from
ron in order to save coal," s
bert Silvester, manager of t
Edison company, yesterday. A
Mr. Silvester said that the coa
age is still serious through
state, he stated that the pres
ployment of water power will
ficient to provide current fc
use.
Reserve Stock Exhaust
The' coal shortage of the
company is due to its being
ed to use up the reserve st(
ing the recent coal miners' st
cording to information from
cal company. They have
coal at the mines, but ther
present no cars with which
it. The Interstate Commer<
mission is now routing all
coal cars back directly to ti
in hopes of .lessening the ahl
When asked if the compat
furnish current for electric '
the gas supply ran out, Mr.
stated that only present co
could be accommodated. On
electric appliances that can
tached in the regular sockets
employed andthose should be
little as possible, he declared.
Detroit Supplies Loal Br
As the local Edison branch
plied partially from the Detr
the conditions here are virtu
sante as those within a radii
miles from Detroit, for the
Edison company practically
the electricity supply in this
Henry W. Douglass, '90, pres
the Washtenaw Gas compar
that the conditions were slig
proved, as there are three car
way and 10 ready to be starte
conditions do -not improve, t
versity laboratories may be
If this is done, practically on
day's supply will be .saved.
May Use' University Co
The conditions are still so
that the present regulations o
supply will be continued 'foi
time. Part of the 13 cars
which were recently received
University may be turned ave
Washtenaw Gas company if t
ent urgent need continues.
Secretary Shirley Smith of 1
versity has urged that the la
ies and University hospital a
the gas supply as much as pos
Warn Against Bicycle Th
Citizens of Ann Arbor are
by the chief of lice against
thieves. On a average one
has been reported missing d
the past month. Up to the
time no. arrests have been ma
CAMPUS ELECTION NOT
Nominations from all' o
izations and all classes mu
in by Monday, May 3, at thi
est. Nominations should be
en to the tUnion desthaddr
to the chairman, of the All-
pus election committee o
Student council.

to House HPIH iIIT
'If the stu-
' with care - --
1 be neces- Speakers, Music and "Smokes" on Pro.
1 the tables gram for Tonight's Assembly
inter," he
The first political meeting on the.
ias are all campus since the straw vote was tak-
e their sup- en will be held at 7:30 o'clock tonight
houses are in the Assembly hall of the Union,
t of their when the University Republican club-
will assemble to determine upon the
r is almost feasibility of joining the Republican
here is no candidate clubs into one University
lents. Most Republican organization.
for the Special effort has obtained such
I specula- speakers as Senator Lenroot, of Wis-
rests both cousin; L. W. Shaw, former governor
he railroad of Iowa; Prof. J. S. Reeves, of the
political science department, and
- Hon. George W. Sample, 'of the local
:IETY circuit court. "Roosevelt's Influence
on Present Day Policies of the Re-
iTION publican Party," "The Senate and the
Peace Treaty," and "The Bonus Bill
lation ban- for ex-Service Men," that is now be-
the Mch- fore congress, are some of the sub-
were taken jects that are to be presented tonight.
ent. (See Number 1, Page Six)

uauea .intense were lost when Scheidler, batting for
Froemke, fanned.
Ruzicka Invincible
*M. H. E.) Kalamazoo was unable to touch the
If a reveiwer should comb his vo- delivery of Ruzicka but took full ad-
cabulary for a word with which to vantage of the Michigan miscues in

With addresses by Dean Henry
Kraemer and Prof. C. C. Glover of the-
pharmacy college, the Aristolochite
society, honorary pharmic fraternity,
gave its spring banquet to its initiates
last night at the Union. Ray Spokes,
Grad., president of the society, gave
the address of welcome and Elmer
J. Traut, '21P, responded for the in-
itiates. William Kirchgessner, '20P,
was toastmaster.
Last night's initiates were: Byron
Swift, '21P, Roy H. Clark, '20P, Ed-
ward D. Mayo, '20P, Joseph Young,
'21P, Elmer J, Traut, '21P, Clinton
V. Krout, '20P, and Hans W. Vahl-
teich, '20P.

describe "Hedda Gabler," he would
probably end his search upon discov-
ering the word, "intense.", Ibsen's play
is everything that thi. term implies;
the plot itself abounds in moments taut
with emotion, and the acting in no
way fails to maintain the pressure.
Madame Borgny Hammer,& a true
actress somewhat of the Bertha Ka-
lich type, gave a remarkable interpre-
tation of Hedda, the woman whom
James Gibbons Huneker has described
as a character of "charmless fascina-
tion." Madame Hammer is distinctly
of a foreign school of acting.
Knowles. Entrikin as Eilert Lovberg
shares honors with Madame Hammer.
Together they forn a pair which sets
a rather difficult standard for the,
remainder of the cast.
Winifred Taylor as Mrs. Elvsted
is one who passes mediocrity.

the eighth.. In this inning all the
damage was done when the Wolver-
ine support weakened and allowed
three runs to be scored. For Michi-
gan, Perrnn, who has been hitting at
such a terrific clip, was the only man
able to make a clean hit off of the
air-tight, pitching of Freeman.
(Continued on Page Three)
ADDITION TO HEALTH SERVICE
RAPIDLY NEARING COMPLETION
Work on the addition to the Univer-
sity Health service building is rapidly.
nearing completion, according to a
statement by Dr. Warren E. Forsythe.
This addition, which is being built
to relive the present staff of the num-
erous cases with which it has been
crowded, will contain five rooms, with
medical attendants for each.

U

Republioan

Club

Smoker

TONI G
Eve ryth

Hon. Le9lie M. Shaw, Former Govenor of Iowa and Atty. Gen. of U. S. under Roosevelt.

L. I. Lenroot, U. S. Senator from Wisconsin.

Prof. J. S. Reeves, Prof. of Poluti-

e

cal Science.

Uo

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