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April 27, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

11

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t1

CIAL NEWSPAPIIRGO THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
ed every morning except Monday during the Univer-
- the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
sociated- Press is exclusively 'entitled to the use for
n of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
this paper and the local news published therein.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ption by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard street.
Business, 960 ; Editorial, 2414.
nications not to exceed 300 words, if signed,. the sig-
necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
totices of events will be published in The Daily at the
f the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
:mmunications will receive no consideration. No man-
be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
ily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
he communications.
Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
ing preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
3 EDITOR.... ..........HARRY M. CAREY-
ark K. Ehlbert Edgar L. Rice
M. Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
carge Brophy Hugh Hitchcock
. E. McManis
E..... H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
..........Renaud Sherwood
ant...................John I. Dakin
ant............. .Brewster Campbell
...." ....Robert C. Angel
partment.... .... . ..Marguerite Clark
.... .. .Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Assistants
Cr. L. Clarke
Thomas J. Whinery
R. W. Wrobleski
George Reinder
Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt
Harry B. Grundy

Winefred Biethan
Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols;
Frances Oberholtzer
Edna Apel
1;. P. Lovejoy
Charles Murchison
Russell Fletcher

A COURSE IN SCOUTCRAFT
Many ex-Boy Scout leaders now on the campus
will be interested to know that Columbia university
has recently inaugurated a course in scoutcraft, co-
operating with the national Boy Scouts organiza-
tion. The purpose of the classes is to teach all the
principles of scouting in an interesting way, by
meetings similar to the regular gatherings of scout
troops and by hikes to camps in the neighborhood. In -
addition to the considerable number of students who
take the course to prepare themselves to lead scout
troops a sideline in their home towns after gradua-
tion, there are many who go in for the out-of-doors
training and exercise purely as a recreation.
Probably no organization reaches the heart of the
American boy quite so influentially as the great Boy
Scout movement. Its excellent principles and ideals
of courage and chivalry and honesty are put across
in a way boys like. Because of the great power
which they possess in training young America, the
scout leaders who guide the troops and patrols
should be picked only from men of the highest cal-
ibre, who understand boys, know woodsmanship,
and can stand as the right sort of examples to the
youngsters who hold them, as heroes. College men,
with a thorough scout training, should be very well
fitted for this kind of leadership. If such a course
were established at Michigan, there can be no doubt
of its immediate popularity.
The University, by including scoutcraft in its
urriculum, would do much more than provide ex-
ercise, recreation, and an understanding of the se-
crets of the great outdoors. It would be doing an
extension work of immeasurable influence among
the boys with whom its scout students would come
in contact wherever they might make their homes
throughout the country, and many of those boys
would groty up with the hope of following their
leaders' footsteps to Michigan.
DEPENDING ON A HUNCH
A habit of the inveterate gambler is to depend on
a "hunch." He will play a close game for a while
and then suddenly stake a large amount of money
on one play simply because he has a hunch that he
will win.
Sometimes hunches do win-but not always. Stu--
dents often try the gambler's trick by neglecting
thei work because they have a hunch they will not
be called upon to recite. Many a lesson has gone
unprepared with impunity because these hunches
have worked. But, after all, they have only worked
to a certain extent. While the student has escaped
a low mark for that particular class period, he has,
nevertheless, left a gap in his knowledge of the
course which is not apt to be repaired after the rec-
itation.
Hunches do not pay in the long run. They are
misleading and each success encourages further de-
pendence upon them until a single failure may
bring disaster. Education is too valuable an item
to leave to the mercy of hunches. The best policy
is to "play safe" in school and leave the hunch to
the gaming board.

TWO
STORES

G RAHEAM
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK.

1

ort
wr
kery

BUSINESS STAFF ,
Telephone 960
WANAGER.................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
.... .......LeGrand A. Gaines, Mari B. Covell
lassifled Ads. ....................Henry Whiting
....... ...C. ............Edward Prieha
.. .. ..Curt P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan

AN DAILY TUESDAY, APR.IL 27,
TEXT BOOKS for EC. 32-B O.&M.
Shaw's Approach to Dusiness Poblems
AT

TWO
STORES

Assistantr
t F. M. Heath
Sigmund Kunstadter
-Harold Lindsay
James T. Rawlings

D.P oyce
Lebte .merville
Lester W. Millard

wishing to secure information concerning news for any
ie Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
to be printed that night.
ght editorsfor the week will be: Monday
besser Campbell; Tuesday night, Edgar
ednesday night, J. E. McManis; Thursday
eorge Brophy; Friday night, Mark Ehl-
:urday night, Joseph A. Bernstein.
TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 1920.
will be a meeting of the entire editorial
tryouts at 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon.
OUR PROSPECTS
in initial conference victbry over Indiana,
the showing made on the southern trip,
all team has again launched forth in quest
stern Conference championship.
sastrous career of the football and basket-
.s this year apparently gave rise, in some
the West, to the belief that Michigan, so
hletics were concerned, was to be an un-
uantity in the days to' come. However,
t-back could only be temporary. We still
ball and outdoor track to strive for. And
school so ably represented in both these
g points to a most successful ending to
's athletic year.
Scholler, of Indiana, expressed his belief
team that :beat Michigan would be the
s of the West in baseball. That is just an-
lence that the people who are in a position
have. not forgotten that the Wolverines
ays been and will always be, real -factors
ttended with before championship laurels
other teams.
1 have ample opportunity to show that our
the premier honors of the West are not
asts, but the outgrowth of our time-hon-
ess in all branches of major college sports.
not forget how to cheer.
UNDERESTIMATED PROFESSORS
tement that faiiiarity breeds conternp
hold good in the case of professors and
k. It is only necessary to investigate the
sses of a faculty man's life and work for
igator to be overcome with admiration.
nmon conception of a professor is that of
uman machine, a mechanical automaton,
one considers the hours they must put in
know nothing about, hours of research,
I writing he realizes that these men are
uman beings following a profession which
rictor C. Vaughan of the Medical college
n some 70 books on widely different sub-
of. A. G. Ruthven has put out 48. Prof.
bbs is the author of 31 or more including
f General Wood" and "The World War
onsequences," a brief history of the late
of which have received much attention in
r and throughout the country. Professor
work in the field of philosophy has gained
nwide renown, while Professor Tilley of
h d'epartment has also reached a high po-
is branch.
rien and many others from the faculty
ed an enviable fame through their writ-
esearch and it is the duty of every stu-
:ognize their real worth and to pay them

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 99)
Between .Detroit,.Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:o a.
m., and hourly to 9:zo p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:o5 a. m., g:s a.
n. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. I., o:so
v. tn. To Ypsilanti only, 1:43 p. M., :o
a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Car West Bound-7:48 a. m. and
12:20 a. m.
J. L. CHAPMAN
JEWELER
AND OPTOMETRIST
113 SOUTH MAIN STREET
Asked At Random
"Do you think students should be
allowed to use the University tennis
courts on Sundays"
Wilfred R. Borinstein, '20, Varsity
tennis man: "I believe that there are
no good reasons why they shouldn't
be allowed to do so. It's pretty dead
around here on Sundays. Then in
large cities all tennis clubs allow
members to use the courts sundays
with 'apparent success. I think it
would be a very good thing if it were
allowed at Michigan."
Lee R. Boyd, '22, member of the
art staff 'of the Gargoyle: "I don't
believe students should play tennis
Sundays for the day is generally re-
spected for church services. There
are six other days of the week which
afford ample time in which to play."
Lawrence C. Jerome, '22, member
last year's All-Fresh tennis team:
"Yes, I think students should be al-
lowed to play Sunday mornings. As
far as I can see, they should be sat-
isfied to use the courts this half of
the day and save the afternoons for
rest."
Frank L. Young, '22: "Students
should, and most of them do, work
hard all week and it is only right that
they should be allowed the use of the
courts on their one free day. I would
say to open the courts, let those play
who desire, and those who do not de-
sire to play can do as they like. In
this way everyone will be satisfied and
no one injured."
Make Changes in Fishing Laws
Two important amendments have
been added to the angler's license law
and are now in effect. All non-resi-
dents above the age of 21, including
women, must have a license to fish in
Michigan waters. The fee for the gen-
eral or trout license has been reduced
from $5 to $3.
Chi Namel did it. What? Made that
old soft-wood floor, look just like a
new hard-wood floor. C. H. Major &
Co. Call 237.-Adv. -
Grunewald Original Creole Pralines
of New Orleans. Tices' Drug Store,
117 So. Main.-Adv.

11111111llllli tll lll tl ttntutn fill IIII 111 1.11 1111111111111111111111111111111il Fn
ENGRAVING ORDER
NOW
Orders for Engraving require more time
than usual. Leave your order card for
VISITING CARDS
Plate and $1.00 cards $3.00 and up
3 A UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES
SUMMER WORK
Exel eBO CHOP SUEY fom STUDENTS WANTED FOR A HIGH
11c0l.en t HOP midn ghtrom CLASS PROPOSITION
11:S0 a. Ch. to midnight One student averaged over. $3.00 per
Steaks and Chops 814 S. Statethour during Spring Vacation
(Prone 1306-W after 7:00 P. M.)
SAFETY ARAZORS
AUTO-STROP
GILLETTE
SEXrTOBLADE
and other standard kinds
The Eberbach & Son Co.
200-204 E. LIBERTY ST.

1'"'

Ihe Telescope

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The tears were streaming -from her eyes,
As her lover left for prison;
He clasped her fondly by the hand,
And she in turn clasped his'n.
Poor Directing
"Gee, I saw something awfully funny at the mov-
ies the other night."
"Zatso ? What was it, a Mack Sennet comedy ?"
"No. There was a show down in a poker game
in one of the scenes and the fellow that lost didn't
hold four kings against four aces for the winner."
Dear Noah:--
What is the most fashionable color for a bride?
Betrothed.
Why in most select circles we understand white
ones are considered the correct thing..
Another Man Gone to the Bow Wows
J. B. McNutt, captain of the humane squad, an-
nounces that he will be at home at the city dog
pound.-Houston Post.
A Thirst That Mocks at Death
"Baruga came running to meet me, saluted and
told- me that the magistrate had fallen off his ve-
randa and had been killed and that he was crying
loudly for whiskey."-Red Book Magazine. .. ..
We Don't Know How Many Honor Points We'll
Get for This One
Athletic girl-We took a tramp to Ypsi.
Mere he-Poor tramp.
To Put It Grammatically, "Ain't We Cruel?"
Co-ed-And all during the time I was convalesc-
ing from that sickness my friends feared that I
would lose m mind.
Stude (interested) And did you?
While passing the Scllbol of Music totay we met
an enraptured listener to an aspiring Melba. When
the last shrill note had died an awful death he
turned to us and said, "Ah, that's what I call a fin-
ished performance." And in bur waggish way we
turned to him and said, "Thank the Lord for that."
Famous Closing Lines .
"This is a hair raistng experience," said the youth
as he commence-d raising his first mustache.
NOAH COUNT.

Just Received
a Shipment of
English dock
Spring Caps
-Look them over-
VARSITY .
TOGGERY SHOP
1107 S. UNIVERSITY
AVE.

K

SEALED
TIGHT-
KEPT

a

M
' n M"

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