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April 27, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-27

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 1920.

PRICE THREEC

SUPREME
. PLEASES
ITICIPANTS

STERN
STILL

BLOCK

E SATISFIED .BY
UTORY EXTENSION
ory Attitude Adopted Toward
la; Zionists Happy Over
Palestine Decision
By Associated Press)
mo, Italy, April 26.-The re-
the supreme council's 10
ing are such that each gov-
taking part seems to con-
,t its aspirations have been
y satisfied. The premiers and
ministers parted in great per-
diality and apparently with
re confidence in the near fu-
lgians are satisfied because
eve the western block of
Great Britain, France, and
remain as solid as ever
rermany. 'The Belgians are
the immediate fixing of the

of

's debts to the Al-

The Italian premier, Signor Nitti,
appears to be content over the coun-
cil leaving the Adriatic situation to
the continuance of direct negotiations
with the Jugo-slavs.
The Greek premier was pleased over
the extension of Greek territories by
the addition of Trace and Smyrna,
ancient possessions of the Greek race.
The attitude of the council was con-
ciliatory, toward Russia and they are
expecting the executive committee
from the supreme economic council
to negotiate with the soviet represen-
tatives for commercial arrangements.
The Zionists are happy over Pales-
tine as they wish a national home.
Yt H. C. A. NOMINATING
COMMITTEE SELECTED
Members of the Y. M. C. A. nominat-
ing committee which will name the
candidates for that organization's elec-
tion to be held in connection with the
coming All-campus election, have
been selected and will announce the
list of nominees this week.
The committee members are: Roy
A. Chandler, '20, chairman, Harry M.
Carey, '20, Dale M. Thompson, '20, and
Sterling Abell, '20E.
Student officers to be elected are a
president, six vice-presidents (one
from each church represented in the
Y. M. C. A.) and a secretary. Three
candidates will be named for each of-
fice.
Voting will be limited to men who
are Y. M. C. A. members. Notices of
membership were sent to all men who
indicated affiliation with the associa-
tion churches at the time of regis-
tration and Pres. J. E. Goodwillie,
'20E, said yesterday that an effort had
been made to notify those men regist-
ered after the regular time. Any man
who has not received his membership
card can obtain one at Lane hall.
Dr. Beebe Added to Summer Lectures
Since the subjects of the lectures in
the series of medical talks to be given
during the Summer Session was pub-
lished, the one remaining open date
has been filled. On the evening of
July 27, Dr. Hugh M. Beebe, profes-
sor of surgery in the Medical school,
will discuss "Our Medical Future."
This number in addition to the others
makes a complete course of six lec-
tures.
Prepare 1«round for Seeds and. Shrubs
Preparatory work on the seeding
and the setting of shrubs around the
Library was 'begun during the week
end. The evergreen, hemlock and yew
shrubs which were ordered have not
yet arrived and the work at present
is merely that of preparing the ground
for both the shrubs and the seeding.
Thirteen Carloads of Coal Arrive
Coal is again being received at the

ANNOUNCE FRENCH
PLAY 'TICKET SALE
Tickets for L'Ami Fritz," annual
Cercle Francais production, will go
on sale Thursday and Friday at Gra-
ham's State street store. The per-
formance will be given Monday eve-
ning, May 3, in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
Reliearsals are rapidly bringing the
play to the finished stage, according
to Director E. L. Hackes. The first
dress rehearsal will be held Saturday
afternoon.
The humor of "L'Ami Fritz"iepends
on dialogue rather than the action of
the play, and the comedy is said to
abound in clever lines. The first act
should be particularly interesting be-
cause of the staging of an unusual
dinner scene.
Associate members of the Cercle
Francais will be sold tickets to the
play at a special discount on present-
ation of their membership cards.
PLANS NWPART
Will Represent "Needs and Hopes of
Average Americans;" 2,000 Ex-
pected at Convention
ADVOCATES PBI, OWNERSHIP
OF MANY VARIED INDUSTRIES
(By Associated Press)
Qhicago, April 26.-The national
convention of the Committee of 48 to!
form a new political party will be
held in Chicago July 10 to 13, it
was announced today by M. Harri-
son, divisional director of the organi-
zation.
The new party "representing the
needs and hopes of average Ameri-
cans will conduct an aggressive cam-
paign against both the reactionary
old .parties and in support of a con-
structive program of economic, social
and political progress," the announce-
ment said.
"The Committee of 48 which adopted
a platform and a statement of aims
at a convention at St. Louis last De-
cember has a membership of 50,000,"
Mr. Harrison said. Two thousand are
expected here for the convention.
The organization's platform in-
cludes: Public ownership of trans-
portation, stock yards, large abattor-
irs, grain elevators, terminal ware-
houses, pipe lines and tanks; the pub-
lic utilities, and principal natural re-
sources.
Equal economic, political and legal
rights are demanded in the platform
irrespective of sex or color.
NEW FACULTY MEN. SECURED
FOR 1920 SUMMER SESSION
University Fortunate in Getting Mem-
bers with Wide Experi-
enc
Because of the unusual number of
students who are expected to attend
the Summer Session this year, it has
been found expedient to secure several
new mmbers for the faculty. The
Summer Session faculty will be aug-
mented by the addition of the follow-
ing members:
W. H. Pyle, of University of Mis-
souri, professor of education; F.
Smith, of University of Illinois, pro-
fessor of zoology; C. Woody, of Uni-

versity of Washington, professor of,
education; H. A. Anderson, of the de-
partment of co-operative research in
Detroit, professor of education; T. J.
Knapp, superintendent of schools at
Highland Park, professor of educa-
tion; E. Gratton, supervisor of art at
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, lecturer on pub-
lic school art; F. C. Gates, of Kansas
State Agricultural college, assistant
professor of botany; H. M. Fitzpat-
rick, of Cornell university, assistant
professor of botany; G. E. Nichols, of
Yale university, assistant professor of
botany; F. -W. Frostic, superintendent
of schools at Wyandotte, Mich., in-
structor in geography; R. E. Cleland,
of Goucher college, instructor in bot-
any; D. Stoner, University of Iowa, in-
structor in zoology; S. H. Ranck, li-
brarian at Grand Rapids public libra-
ry, lecturer on library work; A. S.
Root, librarian at Oberlin college, lec-
turer on library methods; S. C. N. Bo-
gle, principal of the training school for
children's libraries at Pittsburgh, lec-

adva~nce. Varied entertainment
provided at every stop.
South Bend First Stop
After their departure the first
was in South Bend, where they3
entertained at luncheon by the'

TOUR OF, MUSICAL
CLUBS A SUCCESS
Dances and' Pleasure Trips for Men
Throughout the
Journey
ELEVEN CONCERTS GIVEN IN
SEVENTEEN DAY WESTERN TRIP
Ending the most successful and ex-
tensive tour ever undertaken by a
University of Michigan Glee and Man-
dolin club, the special Pullman con-
taining the 33 trip men and their bag-
gage arrived in Ann Arbor Monday
morning.
The club left Friday, April 9, and
has been on the road for over 17
diys. During this time they gave 11
concerts and in every instance due
to the co-operation of the alumni the
houses were sold out several days in

versity club. The concert was given
in the auditorium and was followed
by a dance. At South Bend the large
block M, which has been a familiar
figure at all of the club concerts here,
was stolen. Stops were made at St.
Louis andaat Cheyenne, but the concert
was cancelled at St. Louis. The con-
cert in Cheyenne was followed by a
dance and two members were left be-
hind here but caught up with the
club later.
Play with U. of Utah
At Salt Lake City, Utah, the club
played in combination with the Uni-
versity of Utah opera for two nights.
The University club provided enter-
tainment and secured the right for the
musicians to visit the tabernacle of
the Mormons.
A short stop was made at Berkeley.
Cal., on their way to Los Angeles from
Salt Lake City, but no concert was
given'in the city of the University of
California. The University club en-
tertained the club at luncheon in Los
Angeles and the concert was given in
the Hotel Alexandria. Autos were.
provided for a trip to Santa Monica
beach, Venice, and Universal City,
where motion pictures were seen in
the making. An auto trip was also
taken on the famous riverside drive
to Pasadena.
Stop at Phoenix
When the train dropped their special
Pullman at Phoenix, Ariz., the trip
men had their first close contact with
the wild and woolly west. A concert
was given at the ranch of the South-
western Copper company. Mr. Parker,
who manages this company for the
Goodyear people, is a Michigan alum-
nus. Another special complimentary
concert was given in Litchfield, Ariz.,
in honor of the governor of Arizona.
At El Paso, Texas, a University club
again provided luncheon the day of
the concert and autos for a trip to
Juarez, Mexico. The novelty of a
concert in a foreign land and before a
foreign dignitary in the person of
General Escarava was carried out
while in Mexico.
Give Concert in Chicago
The remaining two concerts of the
trip were given at Fort Worth and in
Chicago with the usual " entertain-
ment. The special Pullman arrived in
Anh Arbor Monday morning on time
and with the unique record of not a
break in their extensive railroad
schedule.
Further plans of the club and the
financial returns of the trip will be
given as soon as they can be com-
pletely formulated, but no serious dif-
ficulties in a financial way were met
with by the club as a whole.
WAGNER TO DISCUSS SPANISH
SONGS AT MEETING TONIGHT
Prof. C. P. Wagner will discuss the
popular Spanish singers of modern
times at the meeting of La Sociedad
Hispancia at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
the Cosmopolitan club room, in Uni-
versity hall. The purpose of the lec-
ture is to give the members of the
Spanish club an idea of the popular
songs of Spain. The talk will be ac-
companied by Victrola records of
Spanish folk songs.
Nominations of officers will take
place at the business session, which
will be followed by a social evening.

was
stop
were
Uni-

More than 2,500 students pinned on
the little green tag yesterday and
signed the pledge to wear old clothes,
while many more would undoubtedly
have joined the movement had not the
tables on the campus run out of tags.
Several hundred of the signers were
women.
Except for perhaps a small patch or
a little shininess every old suit seem-
ed to be in good condition and well
kept, and in many cases were it not
for the green tag it would have been
difficult to tell that the person was
really wearing old clothes.
The campus took a very favorable
attitude toward the wearing of old
clothes, according to the opinion of
the committee in charge. They wish to
emphasize that the wearing of the
green tag and the signing of the pledge
is not the only part of the campaign
to cut the high cost of living, but that
the pledge should really be carried
out. Old clothes should become the
apparel of the realm and no new ones
should be purchased until the prices
for them are cut down.
Nothing further is being planned by
the committee along the line of seeing
that every signer carry out the pledge,
SEN, LENROOT SPEAKER
AKT REPUBLICN SMOKER
HON. L. W. SHAW WILL ALSO
TALK ON THEODORE ROOSE-
VELT
Senator Irvine Lenroot, of Wiscon-
sin, will be present at the Repub-
lican club smoker Thursday evening
to address the students on the "Senate
and the Peace Treaty," and h.' will
also outline the soldiers' bonus situ-
ation. The meeting is to be held in
the Assembly hall on the second floor
of the Union at 7:30 o'clock.
.Hon. L. W. Shaw, attorney general
in Roosevelt's cabinet and former gov-
ernor of Iowa, is to speak on "Roose-
velt's Influence on Present Day Pol-
icies of the Republican Party."
Entertainment in the way of
"smokes and music which is to be
given by the Republican jazz orches-
tra will be furnished free, according
to the committee.
Houlton Lauder, '22L, president of
the Republican club, urges every Uni-
versity man who is interested in the
Republican party to attend this meet-
ing regardless of candidate preference.
At this meeting some attempt to af-
filiate all Republican candidate clubs
into one strong Republican organiza-
tion whose aim is to bring the stu-
dents in touch with the best of Repub-
licanism will be made, according to
Lauder.
Laws Lay Plais
For 1920 Crease
Dance In'flay
Final arrangements for the annual
Crease dance given to the Law school
by the senior law class, to be held
May 7 in Barbour gymnasium, are be-
ing completed and all decorations,
ticket sellers, music and the "Crease
Paper" are arranged for.
Tickets are on sale now and the
different classes are requested to get
them from the following men: Se-
niors, H. S. Haworth, D. W. Dunbar,
A. S. Bugbee, Louis Kawin, N. W.
Wassman; Juniors, L. H. Mattern, T.
B. Doyle, F. L. Walters; Freshmen,

J. E. Spier, D. A. .Forbes, John Carey,
J. K. Pollock. All the ticket sellers
are to get their tickets from H. S.
Haworth, '20L. The price of the
dance is $2.00. '
Music will be provided by Phil Dia-
mond's first orchestra, Diamond pre-
siding over the piano himself, accord-
ing to present arrangements.
The paper put out annually by the
senior laws vill appear at the Crease
dance.
Invitations are to be in the form of
a court subpoena and will' instruct
the recipient to appear at the dance
without fail or undergo' severe pun-
ishment. The official document has
been as closely followed- as possible
and the invitation as it will be sent
appears, at first, as if it were really a1
summons,

the matter will be entirely left to the
the students to deal with as they see
fit.
POSTPONE NOTR4 DAME GAME
Special to The Daily
South Bend, Ind., April 26.-
Michigan-Notre Dame game
postponed on account of rain.
This is the third consecutive
year that the Michigan-Notre
Dame game has been postponed.
FOUR, RAILROADS
ISSUE ULTIMA9TUM
Tell Employees They Must Return
Before 6 Oeclock to Keep
Seniority Rights
CONDITIONS THROUGHOUT STATE
CONTINUE UNCHANGED TODAY
(By Associated Press)
Detroit, April 26.-An ultimatum to
striking switchmen was issued tonight
by four railroads whose men in De-
troit and other points in the state
walked out in the unauthorized strike
nearly three weeks ago. The switch-
men were intotme that they would
have until 6 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon to return to their old places
with full. seniority rights. The, roads
joining in the ultimatum are the Mich-
igan Central, Pere Marquette, Grand
Trunk and Wabash.-«
Few Return
Restoration of all trains cancelled
two weeks ago was announced by the
Pere Marquette. While few of the
men in a few switching centers of the
state have returned to work none of
the Detroit men have gone back. In-
dustrial conditions throughout the'
state continue unchanged today with
approximately 100,000 men working
on part time.
Representatives Meet
Representatives of virtually every
important railroad in Michigan met in
Lansing today with the public utility
committee to consider means of expe-
diting shipments. of coal from the
mines. An appeal was sent to the in-
terstate commerce commission to use
foreign coal cars in transporting coal
to Michigan industries crippled by the
rail tie-up.
OPEN ART EXHIBIT
IN MEMORIAL HALL
Showing the work of four well
known painters and a collection of
Chinese antiques, a new art exhibit in
Memorial hall will open Thursday
and remain open every afternbon the
rest of this week and the two follow-
ing weeks from 2 to 5 o'clock.
Foremost among the works to be
exhibited are those of Mr. Mastro-Za-
lerio, who has a studio in Chicago but
who has been living in Ypsilanti for
the past few years. Mr. Mastro-Zale-
rio specializes in both figures and
landscapes.
Portraits by Mr. Leon A. Makielski
of the architectural M pattment in-
clude those of President Harry B.
Hutchins, Prof. Alexander Ziwet,
Prof. John B. Waite, Prof. Louis H.-
Boynton, and other 'Ann Arbor men.
The landscape paintings which Mr.
Ernest H. Barnes, also of the archi-
tectural department, has been work-
ing'on for the past two years will al-
so be shown.

Mr. Roman Kryzanovsky is another
painter whose work will be exhibited.
A reception will be given to the
members of the Ann Arbor 'Art asso-
ciation Wednesday night.
ENTERTAIN FOREIGN STUDENTS
AT TWO SOCIAL FUNCTIONS
Two members of the committee on
friendly relations with foreign stu-
dents of the Y. W. C. A. and a member
of the Chinese and Japanese students
were entertained from 4 to 6 o'clock
on Sunday afternoon by Mrs. A. E.
Jennings, 1824 Geddes avenue.
Yesterday the visitors were enter-
tained by the Y. W. C. A. advisory
board at a luncheon which was given
l at Foster's tea room.

2500 Students Sign Up For Old
Clothes And Display Green Tags

Memorial ,to Retiring
Be Hung
Union

President
in

CLARKSON 'CHOS
RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF
MOST PAINTERS IN TI
COUNTRY
ESTIMATED THAT C
WILL BE ABOUT

Announcement of the selection
artist who will be employed to
the proposed portrait memori
President Harry B. Hutchins was
yesterday by officials of the Un
Ralph Clarkson of Chicagor
njzed among portrait painters #
of the foremost in the countr;
art committee declared yesterda
been definitely decided upon as
choice.
Selected by Committee
The selection was made in c
eration of the ability of the art
cording, to the committee wh
composed of Wilfred 'B. Shaw,
tary of the Alumni association,
K. Pond, architect of the Mi
Union, and Reed Bachman, ma
editor of the Gargoyle.
Clarkson studied at Boston at
seum for some time, after whi
journeyed to Eurqpe, visiting I
and Italy in order that he might
a special study of portraits. I
considered to be an expert 'a
art.
Choose Campaign Committ
With the announcement of ti
lection of the artist, came wor
a general committee to handle t
tails of the matter of securin
paying for the portrait had als
selected. The matter was turne
to C.. A. Newcomb, '20, general
man, Guy Moulthrop, '22, W. K.
'22A, P. W. Schnorbach, '21E,
Winters, '22, and Maynard N
'22.
Steps will be taken immediate
the financing of the plan. It i
pecteP that 'to complete the pQ
and hang it in the Union buildi
originally proposed, it will be
sary to expend about $5,000.
Portrait as X~emord,
Union officials decided upon i
trait as fitting memorial in ho
the retiring president after cor
ing his exceptional work in c
tion with the Union and after
ing campus opinion.
It is understood that the me
will be entirely a Union affair
PLANS COMPLETED FO
Further arrangements for the
en's Self-Government associatin
ference were made at the meet
the committee yesterday afte'
The program is complete an
outlined at the meeting.
Dean Myra B. Jordan is to gi
opening address at .10:30o(
Thursday morning and among
to speak are Prof. L. A. Strauss,
man of the student affairs com
and Miss Cleo Murtland. The bu
sessions will all be held in Bi
gymnasium and students will 1
mitted who are interested in w
self governmen.
Receptions for the delegates
held at. 4 o'clock Thursday aft
at Helen Newberry residence a
8:30 o'clock Thursday night at 1
Cook dormitory. Dean Myra I
dan will entertain the delegate
reception at 4:30 o'clpck Friday
noon at her home. A picnic bre
up the river has been planned f
urday morning.

NOTICE

The nominating cor
the Michigan Union w
7 o'clock tonight in
on the third floor of

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