100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 25, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN L

%ILY

AL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
every morning except Monday during the Univer-
he Board in Control of Student Publications.
IMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ciated Press is exclusively entitled~ to the- use for
of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
is paper and the local news published therein.
t the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
on by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Inn Arbor Press building, Maynard street.
Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
cations not toexceed 300 words, if signed, the sig
cessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
ices of events will be published in" The Daily at the
the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
xmunications will receive no consideration. No man-
ie returned unless the writer incloses postage.
y does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
e communicationls.
oing On" notices will not he received after 8 o'clock
g preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
EDJTOR..................HARRY M. CAREY
k K. Ehlbert - Edgar L. Rice
M. Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
>rge Brophy Hugh Hitchcock
E. McManis
..........H. Hardy Beth, Lee Mv. Woodruff
.. . Renaud Sherwood
t......................John I. Dakin
it . ... .Brewster Campbell
.aRobert C. Angel
artment........ .... ..Marguerite Clark
... ...Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Assistants
G. E. Clarke
Thomas J. Whinery
R. W. Wrobleski
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt
Harry B. Grundy

Winefred Biethan
Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Prances Oberholtzer
Edna Apel
P. P. Lovejoy
Charles Murchison
Russell Pletcher

OLD CLOTHES TOMORROW
The old clothes movement starts tomorrow. The
Student council, endeavoring to represent campus
opinion, has decided that an "old clothes" move-
ment was preferable to an "overall" movement. To
many of us the old clothes movement will not be a
new one, and the expense of investing six or eight
dollars in denims seemed quite unnecessary.
The movement is not without its drawbacks. A
member of the faculty has called to mind that some
fifteen or twenty years ago there was a similar
"hard times" movement, during which the apparel
of many persons inclined, after a time, to a repul-
sive slouchiness. There is a decided difference be-
tween neatly patched or thread-bare old clothes, and
sloppy apparel such as brimless hats, frayed edge
clothing, and slovenly shoes. There is also the dan-
ger of the movement being too much of a fad,
something temporary, to be considered in a jocous
light for a feW- days. The desired effect can only be
obtained a f tet a lengthy boycott.
A few days ago a pair of overalls having a large
open tear patched with a silk handkerchief were
seen hanging in a "lab" in the chemistry building,
While the spirit of wit is to be expected in such a
movement as this, it should have its limitations and
not hold too full sway. We are confident that time
will tell that Michigan has the ability to apply the
necessary common sense to give the old clothes
movement the proper spirit to make it a far-reach-
ing success.
ATTENTION FRESHMEN !
The Student council has decided that military
credit will not affect a man's standing as a freshman
on the campus. While there are undoubtedly two
sides to this question, the student council repre-
sents the entire student body, and its decision
should stand as law.
Service men to whom this ruling applies should
take reasonable attitude on this decision, for the
council has acted in what it considers the best in-
terestsof Michigan.
From now on the freshman who fails to wear
his pot or toque wil be guilty of violating a tradi-
tion that has proved its worth; he will not be a
good Michigan man.
UNION PROFITS
In one month the soda fountain in theUnion tap
room earned $150 on gross receipts of $3,ooo. This
is a profit of about 5 per cent.
This was before any charge for rent, light, heat,
etc., was made to the fountain, the expenses cover-
ing, in the main, the materials used in the concoc-
tion of sundaes and drinks served. What could be
better evidence of the attempt to keep prices as low
as possible in the Union and at the same time give
the best of materials and service to the students ?
The Union is not a money making proposition but
all efforts are bent toward giving the members the
best of everything at practically cost.

0

Shaw's.Approachto.DBusiness. Pobloms
AT

TWO
STORES

G RAHAM'S
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

rS

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 90
[ANAGER..................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
.....LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
Lassihed Ads....................Henry Whiting
.......... ..Edward Priehs
.......... . P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan

Assistants
F. M. Heath
Sigmund Kunstadter
Harold Lindsay
James T. Rawlings

TEXT BOOKS for EC.. 32-B O.&M.

.:

D. P. Joyce
R1bt. Sommerville
Lester W. Millard

ns wishing to secure information concerning news for any
rjip'Dail should see the night editor, who has full charge
6e tob hpinted_ that night.
night editors for this week will be: Monday
4hesser Campbell; Tuesday night, Edgar
Wednesday night, John / Dakin; Thursday
George Brophy; -Friday night, Mark Ehl
aturday night, Joseph A. Bernstein.
SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1920.
RTAINMENT FOR VISITING TEAMS
or lose the visiting college athlete always
away upper most in his mind the impres-
ft by the treatment and hospitality tendered
ring his stay in the enemy's country. Many
he sting of defeat is partly compensated byr
>yable' week-end with students of the rival
ion.
ire still hearing about the fine treatment and
inment given our track team when they went
1ell. During the coming spring track meets
seball games in Ann Arbor many visiting
will be in the city subject to our hospitality.
>od plan of entertainment well worked out
rried out by men who know the Michigan
should be ready when teams representing
olle es arrive. Every courtesy from the
ey get off the train until they leave the city
be shown them, and they should want for
. Their visit can be made much more enjoy-
>t only by entertainment before and after the
r meet, but when they are getting ready for
during the contest. A little attention to de-
ound the locker rooms and,on the field and
al feeling that everything possible is being
r their welfare leaves a pleasant memory with
beat them; but let's make it an enjoyable
or them, nevertheless.
HONORING THE PRESIDENT
e one has suggested to the officials of" the
an Union that nothing more appropriate
portrait of President Harry B. Hutchins to
g in 'the Union building could be designated
>re fitting memorial for the man who helped
e the Union possible, and the man who is
o go out from the life of the University.
suggestion is a worthy one' The Union has
d it as a most desirable memorial and one
rinot help but voice in the best possible way
e sentiment of the Union members. Campus
voiced by a number of heads of various
ations favos the proposal highly.
students of the University should voice their
Ll of the plan directly, by means of resol-
assed at class -meetings. This would be one
the men especially, showing that they ap-
f the plan.
dent Hutchins has been one of the greatest
o the University. during his administration--
ore it-that any Michigan man could be ex-
to be. He has left an indelible mark in the
of the University by his interest in the
His record should be made everlasting and
nory live in the minds of all 'who come to
iversity. .
Union's plan is one way in which the stu-
f the University can show their apprecia-
what President Hutchins has 'done for Mich-

DETROIT UNITED LINES1
(Oct. 26, 1919)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackspa
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:ro a.
m., and hourly to 9:o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (ex-
pressesmake local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:o5 a. m., 9.: a.
m. and every two hoursto 9:o5 p. m., 10:501
o. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:c~ p. M., :o
a. m.. and to Saline, chang at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bounc--7:48 a. m. and
1:20 a. m.
APRIL
S M T W T F S
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30
Men-Hats are high; your last
season's hat cleaned and re-
'blocked into this season's shape,
with a new band, will look like
new and save you five or ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Asked At .Random
To University women:
"Do you think the women of the
University will do their share In the
old clothes movement to be' inaugu-
rated tomorrowr
Frances Weimer, '21, secretary elect
of the Womel's Athletic association:
"I think that each individual girl will
do the best she can along this line. A
definite movement saying that all
girls should wear old clothes might
not be successful, as that would be
rather radical."
Isabelle E. Swan, '22, correspond-
ing secretary of the Women's league:
"I think a good percentage of the
women will take up this movement.
Not much has been said among the
women, in fact, all he have heard
about it has been through The Daily.
If women leaders took hold of this
idea and advocated it, others would
be more apt to wear old clothes."'
Amy Loomis, '22, recording secre-
tary elect of the Women's league:
"Girls are so funny about those things
that I hardly know what to say. Per-
sonally I hope they all will wear old
clothes.- I believe that if this is made
general the girls will do their share,
but they, wouldn't do it just because
the boys did."
Lillian Reid, '23: "I believe that
the majority of Michigan's wome stu-
dents will try this out. Those who
have nice clothes ought to wear them,
however, for that would be defeating
the original purpose if they merely
laid them aside."
COLUMBIA INSTITUTES HONOR
SYSTEM AT STUDENT REQUEST
Columbia, April 24.-The adminis-
tration officers at Columbia 'University
have decided 'to Diace the honor sys-
tem on trial at the New York institu-
tion, since over 70 per cent of the un-
dergraduates are in favor of the meas-
ure. The practice of eliminating proc-
tors will be employed in all examin-
ations until next fail, when a verdict
can be reached on the merits of the
plan in actual use.
PROFESSOR FRIDAY TO SPEAK'
TO LIBERAL CLUB, TUESDAY
"Labor at the Crossroads," will be
the subject of the address to be de-
livered by Prof. David L. Friday, of
the economics department, at 8 o'clock
Tuesday evening in Natural Science
auditorium. The meeting, which is

iltltt111lN11111111111111111111111li11111111111111111 toi11111111111111111111111111!11!11111110
ENGRAVING "ORD R
Orders for Engraving require more time
than usual. Leave your order card for
VISITING CARDS
Plate and $1.00 cards $3.00 and up
lAe UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES,=
1111111111f111111111111111111111111t1ti11111111t'lr1111111lt111111O11111t11t#IIIttinl ' .
open to the public, is under the au- '
spices of the Michigan Liberal club. A N ARBOR CHOP SUET
/Excellent CHOP SUET from
Read the Daily advertisements. They 11:80 a. in. to midnight
will lead you to the best of Ann Ar- Steaks and Chops 814 8. State
bor's stores.-Adv.. .-
999 TAXI. 999
-i
A DODGE CAR AND
DODGE SERVICE -
ENOUGH SAID.
999 TAXI 999

.

1 ""-

T-j (Z)

T he Telescope

I

_

The little birds sing all the day,
But them we should not praise --
They battle with no prices high,
They have no overalls to buy,
Their rent has not yet reached the sky,
Yes, these for them are lucky days.
The Eternal Recipe
-From our present-day health magazines.
Troubled reader-How can I reduce my ankles
and limbs?
Answer-By exercise such as swimming, bowl
ing, tennis, baseball, bicycle riding, etc.
Another reader-Is there any way to make my
limbs and ankles larger?
Answei-Yes, by such exercise as swimming,
bowling, tennis, baseball, bicycle riding, etc.,
Judging from this we take it that if one's ankles
and limbs are just right, in order to keep them such
you should go in for swimming, bowling, tennis,
baseball, bicycle ridipg, etc.

"9
"''ii

r

4

.

I

I

I wandered to the Library,
To write a funny pome,
But poetry and funny things
Are soon forced from my dome.
A bunch of co-eds 'crost the isle
Are yapping in one ear,
And on the other side, a bunch
Of freshmen huddle near.
The girls are talking manicure,
The frosh are talking girls.
A sophomore now comes breezing in
And his colors he unfurls.

COPVR4G,? 19.10
HIRSH WiCKWRE GM

s:

DON'T ACCEPT EXCUSES. Insist onevery-
thing anyone can put into good clothes.

A

HIRSH,
WIG KWIRE

I

I don't know if this even rhymes,
This would-be-funny pome;
The noise still rages, me for air,
I'm done, I'm going home.
Jay Whitleaf Greenier.
Like West Hall This One "Goes on Forever"
First stude-Too had about Jack. Since he came
to college he hasn't made his salt.
Second ditto-Is that so? What's wrong?
First-Why they furnish it at his boarding house.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, taking a course in jwgraphy," he muttered
.as he noticed th, co-ed chewing gum.
NOAH COUNT.

Go to
JOHN KAUPP'S
609 E. William St.
FOR
"GOOD EATS"
Things Cooked as You
Like Them
1-MINUTE SERVICE
for breakfast. Be on
time for your 8 o'clocks
Regular Meals Sun. Night

CLOTHES

are hand-tailored from the finest materials to meet
just such demands.
We invite you to investigate these good clothes
without any obligation to purchase.

WAGNER & CO.

303-305 SOUTH STATE

1 _______________ ___________ - -. r.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan