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April 25, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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It

ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY AIM) NIGHT
SERMIE

-j

,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1920.

PRICE TH

bOY TO.
GH COST'
MONDAY

EDULED TO
STYLE TO.

BE[

JDENTS TO PLEDGE
SUPPORT FOR DRIVE
tell Irges Wearing of Old Suits
Instead of Boosting Overall
Fad
1 is in readiness for the inaugura-
of a vigorous campaign for the
"ing of old clothes on the cam-.
George Anderson, '21, chairman
e Student council committee ap-
;ed for the affair, announced yes-
ty.
bles will be placed at convenient
as on ,the campus between the
s of 9 and 12 o'clock tomorrow
ing and 2 and 4 o'clock tomor-
afternoon, when students who de
o take an active part in the cam-
L will be given the opportunity
ianifesting their intentions of
Lng up the movement by signing.
es to that effect. The tables will

Western Papers
Laud GWee Club;,
Joost Michigan
The success of the Varsity Glee and
Mandolin club is partially attested by
a column article in the Pasadena Star:
News, of April 19.
Never before had the coast heard
anything in the way of jazz pep that
the "All Campus Jazz orchestra" pre-
sented , it said. The assistant mana-
ger of the Alexandria hotel, where the
concert took placer is quoted as say-
ing, '.I never knew before what real
jazz was."
The college songs transplanted more
than one grad back to the time when
he was a student. The Varsity String-
ed Quartette, the Midnight Sons, and
,the Jazz orchestra were the starring
features of the concert.
ICHIMES' MANAGER

RBLROAD STRIKE
MAY CLOSEDOWN
ILLINOIS PLANTS

GENERAL MANAGERS
BREAKS IN RANKS
SWITCHMEN

REPORT
OF

DETROIT STRIKERS
DOWN MEDIATION

MICHIGAN WIN

OVER

TURN
PLAN

Nervous Breakdown Forces Him
Quit All Campus Activities;
Sonne Succeeds as B. M.

INDIAN,

to

a the walk at
et and North;
e the Lilrary,

the corner
University
and at the

ne With Sentiment
aign is in line with rap-
ig sentiment spreading
the country aimting to
resent high cost of cloth-
is gradually mountbig to'
heights. The local move-
e the means of allowing
tudents, to express their
the matter by appearing
us in old Nothes. Thin
ean, however, that they
disreputable clothes. It
his, together with an ex-
g of sweaters, that the
ncil emphatically declar-

veralls, too, is dis-
s said to be noth-:
not likely to have
of the movement
to expend money
utfits, but to wear
id to get as much
ar out of them as
time as the price
scend to a reason-

ailar to that adopted by
council has also be(-
her university organiza-
ts of Adrian college, Col-
rsity, Dakota Wesleyan.,
in of Middletown, Conn.,
g the first to use this
efeating the H. C. L.
TO CHINE HERE

HENRY WHITING, '21, CHOSEN I
BUSINESS HEAD OF WOLVERINE
Walter S. Riess, '21L, business man-
ager of The Chimes and the man who
is credited with suggesting he maga-
zine, resigned lfis position o the pub-
lication yesterday because of illness
that physicians say will keep him out
or school for the remainder of the
year.
With his resignation from The,
Chimes came the announcement that'
he would also be forced to give up of-
fices in the various other campus ac-
tivities in which he is interested. This
will include the treasurership of the
Student Committee on Athletic Af-
fairs.
Had Nervous Breakdown
Riess' illness was the result of a
slight attack of the lu, late in the
scond semester, coupled with his re-
fusal to give in to it and overwork.
The result was a general nervous
breakdown forcing him to a hospi-
tal. Later, physicians ordered him
home.
He returned to the University after.
a week at home in order to resume
his work on the publication and in tue
Ibniversity. However another break-
down resulted and he was again fore-
ed home. He will be forced to take an
extended rest, physicians say.
Sonne to Suceed
With the acceptance of the resigna
tion from The Chimes, by the Board
in Control*of Student Publications at
their meeting yesterday, Stuart Sonn,
'20, credit manager, whom Riess had
appointed to actduring' his absence,
was chosen to succeed him for the
remainder of the year.
The board also named Henry Whit-
ing, '21L, student councilman nd for-
mer Daily man, business manager of
the Wolverine for this coming sum-
mer.. The managing editor will be
named later.
GRNDRPIDSINS MEET
Michigan's Informal Swimming Team
Loses to Y-Score 88 1-2 to 29 1-2
(Special to The Daily)
Grand Rapids, April 24.-Michigan's
informal swimming team succumbed
before the Grand Rapids Y. M. C. A.
outfit here tonight by a score of 38 1-2
to 29 1-2. The relay, the final event
on the program which was the decid-
ing event of the meet, swung the vic-
tory to the side of the Grand Rapids
team.
The feature of the meet was the
work of Gilmbre of Michigan, who
won the 100 yard dash by a spectac-
ular sprint. His time was 1:07. White
of Michigan fell the victim to inex-
perienced judges who gave him one
point less in the fancy diving contest"
than they gave Ruggles of the Y team.
Kramer nosed out Koch in the plunge.
Porter took first for Michigan in the
back stroke.
The meet was pronounced a suc-
cess.

Manufacturers of Chicago Wire Sen-
ator McCormiek for Government
Aid in Settlement
Chicago, April 24.-While the Rail-
road General Managers association re-
ported tonight "decided breaks in the
ranks of striking workmen," the Illi-
nois Manufacturers' association in a
telegram to Senator McCormick said
manufacturing plants would be com-
pelled to close unless railroad facili-
ties and cars were forthcoming.
"The railroad' situation is very se-
rious, and we need the help of the
government. Is it afraid to act?" the
telegram said.
Mr. McCormick was asked to renew
his efforts to get the railroad board
I away from the "Washington atmos-
phere."-
350 Men Return
It was announced that 350 men re-
turned to work today, bringing the
total to 1,036. These were aided by
773 new switchmen, recently employed
or brought here from other points.
The cases of 42 strikers, arrest-
ed last week, were continued today un-
til May 3.
District Attorney Clyne told the
strike leaders that if they persisted in
the agitation of the strike, the gov-
ernment would adopt more drastic
measures in dealing with them.
Detroit, April 23.-Switchmen here
today declined the offer of F. C. Haw-
ley,, a federal official, in an attempt to
settle the differences between the
strikers and officials he said tonight.
The mediator said he had an agree-
ment signed by local railroad officials
that the men would be reinstated with
their former standing if they would
return.
Talks to Strikers
This fact was made known to the
switchmen, he said, but when he at-
tempted to address the strikers' meet-
ing he was told they would not be
received. The objection as explained
to him, Mr. Hawley said, was that he
had induced the Buffalo strikers to
return a week ago on similar terms.
Mr. Hawley said he would make an-
other attempt Monday to end the Walk-
out. Railroad officials reported condi-
tions had been practically ended.
The Employers' association of De-
troit tonight telegraphedl Michiganj
congressmen to relieve the industrial1
situation here.
Alumna Visits University
Hope Fisher, of Detroit, who took
graduate work in the University sev-
eral years ago, is spending a few days:
in the city as the guest of friends.

MICHIGAN TAKES
SDrake Relays Prove Record Breakers
with Four Counts Smashed;
Illinois Leads
SUCKER STATE OUTFIT WINSx
MILE FROM WOLVERINE SQUA
(Special to The Daily)
Des Moines, Iowa, April 24.-Win-
ning only the half mile relay and the
first section of the mile relav, the
University of Michigan track team
came away from the. Drake relays,
held here tonight, satisfied with its
record.
With teams entered in only these
two events, the showing of the Michi-
gan team was satisfactory.
Win Half Mile
Butler, Loesch, Cook, and Wetzel,
forming the half mile relay squad for
the Wolverines, counted first place, in
the University half mile relay with
Missouri, running second and Iowa
third. The time was 1:29 1-5-
In the first section of the mile re-
lay the Michigan team, made up of
Wheeler, Butler, Burkholder, and
Wetzel, took first place with their time
at 3:24. However, the Illinois team
led the second section with their time
set at 3:21 3-5. The victory for the
event was therefore awarded the Il-
linois squad.
Four Records Broken
With four previous records broken
during the meet, it was pronounced the
most successful of the 11 that have
been held here. Iowa State broke the
carnival record for the two mile re-
lay by coming within 1-5 of a second
from the world's record. Their time
was 7:53 1-5.
Scholz of Missouri did the 100 yard
dash in exactly the same time, 9 4-5
seconds, as he did two years ago. Illi-
nois won the mile by '3:21 3-5, low-
ering the record by 1-5 of a second.
Illinois also won the four mile re-
lay.
Incomplete Sunmaries
Half mile uniyersity relay won by
Michigan; Missouri second; Iowa
third. Time 1:29 1-5.
Two mile college won by Wabash.
Grinnell second; Carleton third. Time
8:15 2-5.
Half mile college relay won by Coe;
Union second; Carleton third. Time
1:34 4-5.
-Mile university relay (first section)
won by Michigan; Minnesota second;
Missouri third. Time 3:24.
Mile university relay (second sec-
tion) won by Illinois; Ames second;
Notre Dame third. Time 3:21 3-5.
Miss Brandenburg Visits Here
Henrietta Brandebury, '18, of Hunt-
ing'ton, W. Va., is visiting friends In
Ann -Arbor over Sunday.

MORE

THAN FIFTY COLLEGES

TAKE PART ON FINAL
DAY

aI

glate Assocla-
Government

CAPTAIN PARKS
MICHIGAN WEEK, HUGE
SUCCESS, SAYS DETROIT

legates from universities of
e west, among them being
r members of the Middle-
r-collegiate Association for'
Self Government, will attend
nce here next week begin-
rsday morning and lasting
aturday. Kentucky, Ala-
ra, and 17 other universities
g regular members in the
a will send visiting dele-
I be the seventh annual con-
the association for the pur-
ending the interests of wom-
gbvernment.
ite Chapin, '20, president of
n's league, and Marguerite
president-elect, will repre-
igan. Michigan's president
sident of the association this
rice-president and treasurer
sandra Love of DePauw uni-
id secretary, Elizabeth For-
the University of Minnesota.
tinued on Page Three)

Honorable Leslie W. Shaw of Iowa,
To Address G. O. P. Organization

Representatives of more than 50
colleges and universities of the coun-
try, including several hundred Mich-
igan students, attended the Intercol-
legiate luncheon held yesterday noon
in Detroit which marked the end of
the University of Michigan week fes-
tivities in that city.
Colors Lead Parade
Following the luncheon, a parade,
headed by Michigan's band and es-
corted by the Detroit police, marched
to Navin field to witness the Detroit-
Chicago baseball game. Three men
in white uniforms carried the colors,
including the Maize and Blue, at the
head of the parade; the University
contingent of more than 100 students
forming the van of. the procession.
At the luncheon, Frank E. Duffy of
Bay City, representing the University,
and Hughie Jennings, coach of the
Detroit baseball' 'team, representing
Cornell, spoke. Members of the 'Tiger
and White Sox teams attended the
banquet. Henry Ledyard of Yale act-
(See Number 1, Page Six)
Y, K g AITOSTAIRT IVE
Women Will Raise $1,700 For Support
of Dr. Clara Sargent in China
Women of the University Y. W. C.
A. will, on Thursday, begin their drive
for $1,700 for the support of the work
of Dr. Clara M. Sargent, '15M, .'in
China. Dr. Sargent, who has been in
China for more than a year studying
the language and customs of the Chi-
nese people, is now beginning the -or-
ganization of the woman's public
health campaign in that country.
She is connected with the school
of Physical Education and Hygiene in
Shanghai, working under the auspices
of the national Y. W. C. A.
While at the University of Mich-
igan Dr. Sargent was well known to'
Dr. V. C. Vaughan, of the Medical
school, who says of her:
"Dr. Sargent is one of the best qual-
ified woman physicians who has ever
graduated from this University. I am
well acquainted with the work that
she did in this country and also with
what she is doing in China.
(Continued on Page Three)

PARKS PITCHING,
SCSICTOF
Hoosiers Unable to Connect II
Wolverine Captain's Clever
Delivery
SCORE 10 TO 3 COUNT IN
INITIAL CONFERENCE BATT
\ (Special to The Daily)
Bloomington, Ind., April 24.-In.
first Conference game of the sea
Michigan won from Indiana by a
to 3 scone.
Coach Lundgren's men led throng
out the contest, Parks keeping
Indiana team scoreless until the eig
inning. The Wolverines drove K
kel, the Hoier's star twirler, fr
the mound in the fourth round.af
having garnered five runs. Woot
who replaced Kunkel, held the Mic
gan batters at bay until the eigi
when he weakened and allowed
Wolverines to score four runs.
Helpless Before Parks
The Indiana team was helpless'
fore Captain Parks' masterly twirl
until late in the game. The Mich
moundsman eased up after this i
ing, the Indiana batsmen scoring th:
runs off him in the last two roun
Parks struck out 10 Hoolsers and
sued but two passes.
In the eighth, when the Michig
captain, with the game sewed up, e
ed up on the air tight ball he w
hurling, the Hoosiers gleaned two
their three counters. Timely hits
the Indiana batsmen placed two ri
ners on base. Raueschenbac, cen'
fielder, with a well placed bingle, dr(
in both base runners. Their oti
counter came in the ninth.
Indiana boosters were not surpr
ed at the victory by the Wolveri
outfit, yet they declared they expeci
the score to be less overwhelmii
Ray Kunkel, veteran pitcher of th
years reputation, was released fr
any responsibility for the defeat b
cause he pitched yesterday agaii
Wisconsin and was probably tir
Yesterday's game was also a deft
for the Hoosiers.
Lauds Lundgren's Team ,
Coach Harry Scholler of the India
outfit repeated his recent predicti
that any team that could beat Mic
gan would win the cnference cha:
pionship. He spoke highly. of 't
merits of Lundgren's outfit.
Michigan allowed only two errc
to be chalked up against them, wh
the Hoosiers were credited with foi
The snappy fielding of the Wolv
ines was an aid in holding down t
Indiana score. The Michigan fielde
made but two errors against five I
the Hoosier nie.
Kunkel pitched a -hard game Frid
in which Indiana beat Wisconsin 7
6, and this imay account, in part, f(
the ease with which the Wolverin
hit him.
The contest was a long affair, t
ing two hours and nineteen minu
before the last man was put out
the ninth.
Summaries
The summaries are as follows:
Michigan ......00 3 2 0 0 0 4 1-
Indiana.......0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1-
Hits-Michigan 10, Indiana 6. Err
Michigan 2, Indiana 5. Batteries
Parks and Genebach (Michigan); K
kel, Wooton and' Dennis (Indian
Umpire-W. G. Sprow. Time -

hours, 19 minutes.
PARISIAN MATHEMATICIAN TO
GIVE LECTURES MONDA
Professor Hadamard, of the Math
matics department of the XUnivers
of France, Paris, will give two 14
tures here Monday. Professor Had
mard is the world's greatest mathen
tician of today. His subject for bo
lectures will be, "The Early Work
Henri Poincare," the great mathen
tician and physicist. The lectures w
be given in the east Physics lecti
room at 10 and 1 o'clock.

A Republican smoker, under the au-
spices of the University Republican
club,. will be given in the Assembly
hall of the Union on Thursday, April
29.
Hon. Leslie W. Shaw. of. Iowa, will
be the principal speaker of the eve-
ning who will talk on "Roosevelt's In-'
fluence on Present Day Policies of the
Republican Party."
According to a statement by the of-
ficers of the Republican club, the pol-
icy of that organization is to bring
the best speakers of the country to the,
University to address the students on
the present day policies of govern-.
ment as understood by the Republican
party. The members of the Republi-
can club desire that as many towns-
people and students turn out for this
smoker as possible.
They declare that the outcome of
this meeting will decide as to what
kind of support the Republican club
will be able to expect from the pation-
al committee. Music at the smoker
will be furnished by the Republican

jazz orchestra, made up of prominent
musicians on the campus.
DR. WARTHIN WILL
ADDRESS HOOSIERS
Dr. Alfred S. Warthin, of the Medi-
cal school will go to Indianapolis,
May 4. 5. and 6. as the official rep-
resentatilie of the University, and as
a guest of the University of Indiana.
The occasion is the celebration of the
100th anniversary of - the medical
school of the University of Indiana.
Dr. Warthin will deliver the prin-
cipal address in the afternoon of May
5, his subject being, "Spirochaeta Tal-
lida." In the evening he has been
asked to respond to atoast, on "State
Medicine."
The celebration will be held both in
Indianapolis and Bloomington. The
first and last days of the celebration
will be spent in Bloomington and the
other day, May 5, the big day of the
three will be spent in Indianapolis.

Columbia in Race
pril 24.-Yale de-
rew tonight by a

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER

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