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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 29, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY,Z

duitgat t iy
AL NEWSPAPKR AT THE
VERSI'Y OF MICHIGANE
I every, morning except Monday
university year by the Board in
Student Publications.
OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ciated Press is exclusively entitled
for republication of all news dis-
dited to it or not otherwise credited
per and also the local news pub-
n.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
a second class matter.
tions by carrier or mail, $3.5!x.
Ann Arbor Press Building.
Business, 960; Editorial. 2414.
cations net to exceed 3o words,
the signature not necessarily to ap-
zt, but as an evidence of faith, and
events will be published in The
he discretion of the Editor, if left
.d to the office.
communications will receive no
n. No manuscript will be re-
as the writer incloses postage.
ly does not necessarily endorse the
expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
oeser...........danaging Editor

i_

r

Carey............News
,ar ..... .. City
.x ...Associate
McAllister..... .Feature
Ehlbert.........Telegraph
,andis................sPort
Clark..........Women's
ernsey...........Women's

Editor
Editor
Editor'
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor1

inkman.....Dramatic
music
E xchange
)hl.......,. Literary

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

ISSUE EDITORS
[erbert R. Slusser Paul G. Weber
hnauSherwood Edgar L. Rice
.ug W. itchcock J. P.. Hart
William Clarkson
r ~REPORTERS
homas H. Adams John E. McManis
ichard 1. Marshall C. H. Murchison
rene E~ls Mary A. Lane
~trna Schermerhorn John I. Dakin
rthr W. Brown Logan Trumbull
EfmI:nerson Swart Stewart Bater
arie Crozier Muriel E. Bauman
BUSINESS SAFF
arold Makinson........Business Manager,
gacs I,. Abele.,...Asst. Business Manager
e4 and A. Gaines..Asst. Business Manager
1,Ru M.I,eFevre. ...Asst. Business Manager
. A. Iveit.inger..Asst Business Manager
Saild M. Major....Asst. Business Manager
onuell R. Scehofner..Asst. Business Manager
SENIOR STAFF
[ r 1. ve Edward Priehs, Jr.
obrtE Mc~eari Hery Whiting II
large A Cadwell' J. Duane Miller
[aynard A. Newton R. A. Sullivan
. jJUNIOR STAFF
urt. S6chneider Isabelle Farnm
o R.'Strmecr Jr. harper Moore
ames A. Kennedy, Jr. Arthur L. Glazier
THURSDAY, ?MAY 29, 1919.
[anie Editor--Charles.H. Murchison
THE NEW IDEA IN TRAINING
PROFESSIONAL MEN
The present age is one of specializa-
ou -- but not at the expense of a.
oderate knowledge of literature and
ie arts.
The latest step in this movement
place a certain amount of culturAl
'aining at the bottom of all profes-
Lonal education has been taken by
10 D'ental Faculties association of
merican Universities.
This organization has seen fit to
vise' the equivalent of two years of
re ii'ary literary college work be-
>re the study of dentistry. In other.
vor, it has realized that the den-
.t should know more than the mere
tecbanics of dentistry.
Literary qualifications have been de-
landed by' the leadiig law and medi-
al- schools of the country for some
me. 'Engineering schools have al-
sady seriously considered this pre-
aratory work, and in all likelihood
'ill soon take active steps toward its
tablishment.
This tendency to a broader and more
ultural education is. typical of the
ewer age in which we are living. The
enith of specialization seems to have
een reached in American colleges,
nd today we are reacting to a bigger
lea - the idea that life holds more
ian mastering the details of our par-
cular calling.
THE INTER-ALLIED GAMES
Carl Johnson, Michigan's star track
ian, has been selected to represent
ie University in the inter-Allied
ames to be held in France next
ionth.
There is a deep significance attach-
I to this international athletic meet
-the first to be held since the Olympic
Ames of 1912. In these games the
orld will see one mqte manifestation
' the great movement back to pre-
'ar institutions that have made them-
elves worth revivng.
The games have stood the test of
even years of dormancy. Today the
ations have made recognition of the
emetidous value of competitive ath-
ktcs by once more bringing them to
ght.
To be sur, Michigan is not to have
large representation in the inter-
Ilied games. But the man she is
hnding is one whose quality has been
anted national recognition.
To Carl Jtohnson falls the honor of
trrying the spirit of the Maize and

Clipped Editorial
SCHOOLS OF JOURNALISM
(From the Detroit News)
The ideal of the university and col
lege is to train its students how to
think, so that they may go into the
world preparede topress forward the
boundaries of cultural and) technical
knowledge and achievment, at the
same time developing that knowledge
of themselves and their fellows that is
wisdom.
To no other person is this knowl-
edge and wisdom more necessary than
to the newspaper reporter and writer
He it is Who collects, selects and pre-
sents in what he considers their due
proportion the facts on which the
great majority of people depend to
form their judgment on current is-
sues and upon which to base their
philosophy of life.
Newspapermen have looked to the
universities and the colleges to train
men for the professors of journalism;
schools of journalism have been es-
tablished, many of them, for years,;
and it is fair now to judge of their
type of men and women necessary to
success or failure in turning out the
judge with sureness of the value and
'significance of news, and with the
proper philosophical foundation to
comment upon the news with author-
ity. . Such journalism as is taught
at the University of Michigan may be
said not to accomplish this purpose.
This great institution sends out grad-
uates acquainted with the history of
leading newspapers and famous news-
papermen; conversant with rules of
English construction; able to place
semicolons correctly, but it is left to
the newspapermen in active service
to impress upon the graduates that
great human charity, indefatigable
and intelligent effort in gtting all
possible angles on any given subject,
loyalty to principle and to his organ-.
ization and accuracy, accuracy, accur-
acy are the things without which no
nicety of diction, clever assembling of
words or profundity of book learning
will avail.
The university sends its journalists
away from the campus knowing the
theory of short story and novel con-
struction, but shockingly ignorant of
history, sociology, economics, and ele-
mentary psychology, and, what is sad-
der, without knowledge that his ignor-
ance in these subjects is to his dis-
advantage. It is not until after weary
years of journeyman service that the
university journalist begins to realize
wherein he is lacking, and in the
meantime he may have succumbed to
the lure of the easiest way in news-
paper work;' to the acquisition of the
abiilty tp distinguish the feature
story, present it in snappy, individual,
entertaining style, and then to be con-
tent; to quit thinking.
One trouble seems to be that univer-
sities like Michigan are inclined to
consider their journalism schools as
merely courses in English; to place
an charge of them men with little or no
active newspaper experience, unac-
quainted with the ideals, and the trials
and the conditions of newspapermen
and newspaper work. The English
professor conducting a journalism
school of this kind, when he is not
busy with teaching his ideas of prop-
er newspaper English construction,
often has been known to teach his
students the grossly false theory that
the business office dominates and dic-
tates to the editorial office, and that
this must be so because a newspaper
is primarily a money making institu-
tion like a slaughter-house or a mil-
linery store.
That idea seems prevalent among
university men. Certainly a newspap-

er must be run at a prot; because if
it did not have sufficient public con-
fidence to make a profit it would not
be a good newspaper. But it is public
confidence and public confidence alone
that makes a newspaper successful,
and the public detects ulterior mo-
tives operating to' suppress or distort
truth with a speed which has astonish-
ed many a monied man who bought a
good newspaper property thinking he
could use it to further personal am-
bitions.

BARBERS WILL TAKE REST TO
CELEBRATEDECORATION DAY
All Tonsorial Parlors to Remain Open
Until Eight O'clock
Toight
After due consideration, and care-
ful weighipg of the pro's, and con's
of the case, the barbers union has
decreed that allbarber shops in Ann
Arbor will be closed on Friday, but
will be open until 8 o'clock Thursday
Right
By remaining open until this late
hour, it is expected that all the local
Beau Brummels may be accommodat-
ed, and will present a neat appear-
ance on Decoration day. Those who
consider it a necessity to shave every
24 hours may beinconvenienced by this
ruling, and if they appear somewhat
shaggy on Friday evening, they are
urged to bear in mind that Decoration
day comes but once a year, and it is
the barbers' privilege to "step out" on
this occasion. Moreover, the morning
will be spent in sharpening razors,
and scissors, so that highly efficient
service will be assured on Saturday.
WANTS DEAN OF MEN
CRITICIZES DOCTRINE THAT MEN
IN COLLEGE SHOULD CHOOSE
FOR THEMSELVES
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
"Granted that a man of high acad-
emic standing, coupled with a square
sense of the right, and a warm heart
can be found, I believe it would mean
a curbing of personality and a ten-
dency to destroy a man's power toi
choose for himself," says one of the
campus leaders in voicing his judg-
ment on a Dean of Men.
So fortified has .the Michigan man
become behind his mask of indepen-
dence that he even shies at the idea
of an elderly advisor. It will de-
prive him of his personality, and re-
duce him to the level of taking an-
other's opinion. So does President
Wilson find it with a system of ad-
visors.
No man can afford to plunge into
things on his own opinons. Our en-
tire system of government recognizes
this fact; it goes beyond that to the
industrial world; in fact it would be
difficult to find where such a system
does not exist. And who among us can
say that because a man takes advice
he loses personality. It is indeed only
by intimate discussion with others that
we often arrive at the best conclu-
sions with regard to many actions.
Conceited indeed would be the man
who would set the college wan above
the level of the best niinds in the na-
tion, and make him impervious to ad-
vice.
In the University man finds himself
in a formulative period. He frequent-
ly is undecided as to what he desires
to do. And just as frequently he hesi-
tates to approach the professor with
his problem. It may be argued that
the professor stands as a link be-
tween the faculty and the student
body, but it is a known fact that the
majority of students very seldom are
on any better terms with their in-
structors than a speaking acquaint-
ance. Far be it from the student to
bring a matter which concerns him
personally to such a man, under the
conditions.
It is for such students that the Dean
of Men would fill a big place in the
life of the University. Our deans at
present cannot perform these func-
tions, for they are too much wrapped
up in their administratice duties.
Care must be exercised, however,
in the choosing of such a, man. If he

comes to be an official, there will be
for him a certain attitude of awe
which will counteract the very purpose
for which such an' office is created. A'
Dean of Men must be a man who can
be one among the men, who by his
personality will bring the student to
feel that he is personally interested
in him, and not merely there to draw
the salay attendant upon the work.
ONE INTERESTED.
Science has proved that newspaper
advertising pays best. You can reach
all the students and faculty through
The Daily.-Adv.

Engineering News
Changes in the summer session
course of engineering mechanics have
been made to avoid conflict with math-
ematics 4. Inquiries may be made at
the secretary's office for particulars.
Examination schedules for the engi-
neering college have been prepared
and will be sent to the printer within
the next few days. It is thought that
they will be completed by the first of
next week, at which time they will be
on distribution at the secretary's of-
fice.
Particular care has been taken to
avoid conflicts in examination dates.
but owing to the number of students
who are not taking regular courses, it
has been unavoidable to some extent.
Special examination hours have been
set for students coming under this
head.
E. J. Smith, graduate of mechanical
engineering in 1914,is in the city on
business. He is connected with the
Ingersoll-Rand company.
Seniors met at 3:30 o'clock Wednes-
day afternoon near the senior benches
in cad and gowns and attende the No-
tre Dame game.
A special guide will conduct the
members of the American Society of
Mechanical Engineering through the
Hoover plant Thursday afternoon on
a tour of inspection. Particular study
will be made of the manufacture of
steel ball bearings.
Those who will make the trip will
meet at 3 o'clock near the arch. All
classes in mechanical engineering are
to be dismissed at that hour, and men
taking courses in other departments
wishing to go should see Prof. H. C.
Anderson. It is expected that the
trip will take about two hours.
New England Club
ance--Arcade Hall
TONGHT 9 TO 1

Plate Printing

All work guaranteed

I VAHR' S UNIVERSITY
~ BOOK STORE

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT

308 S. STATE ST.

ALWAYS ASK FOR
nII
)fn rs3
AD NN

SENIORS-See to it Early
The matter of your Engraving for Graduation-
Vsitng Crd

Plate and 100 Cards

- $2.25 to $4.50

- $1.25 per hundred cards

I

CE

CREAM

Delicious and Refreshing

lb

Students of the University of Michigan are cordially invited to
inspect out neW lila of
PARIS FASHIONS

Novelties in Tailored Suits, Gowns
and Dresses
Newest materials, newest models, newest colorings,
lowest prices

TICKETS, $1.50
Open to Campus

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71Km

Let's Go, New England!!!

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Try Our Cool and

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Sodas and Sundaes

Dependable, Sclentiflc, Drugess
EYE
EXAMINATIONS
Phone 590 for appointment
Emi H Arnold
Optometrist 220 S. main S
Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES

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CORNER STATE AND LIBERTY

THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 1098. Xaln St.

i

/ df o

To be a success, a department of
journalism must be in charge of some
man who knows the newspaper from
many years of service; a man who
will study what the university as a
whole has to offer to the student in
journalism and incorporate it in his
sthedule of studies; but above all, he
must be inspirational and able to teach
the student with all the force of a
zealot that to be a journalist he must
have a mastering sense of duty to his
fellows.
France Auctioning War Automobiles
Paris, May 28.-The French military
authorities hold periodical sales by
auction of automobiles for which the
army has no further use. The demand
for these machines, many of which do
not need very great repairs, is so
great that one day's receipts recently
were the equivalent of $240,000.

Caps and Gowns for Commencement
Leave your measurements
for bachelors', doctors', or masters'

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 3o, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cara-8:o a.
m., and hourly to 8:xi p. n.
Jackson Limited and Express Cas-7 :48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. tn. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cara East Bound-:oo a. M., 9:0o a.
m. and every two hours to 9:os p. m., ro:so
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:43 p. in., zs:"
a. in., 1:10 a. i, and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. in. and
I1:20 p. Mi.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-8
$14 S. State St."Ann Arbox
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The AnniArbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources........4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

'the new
FORMI- FIT
25 CENTS EACU
2LUETT.PEAIODY C5 Gotw/

caps and
Hoods are

gowns

for any college.

included.

. 1

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