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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 16, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY,

[CIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
NIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
hed every morning except Monday
the university year by the Board in
of Student Publications.
-R,OF THE ASSOCIATED PREISS
ssociated Press is exclusively entitled
se for republication of all news dis-
redited to it or not otherwise credited
paper and also the local hews pub-
eren.
.d at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
n, as second class matter.
iptions by carrier or mail, $3.59.
Ann Arbor Press Bdilding.
:s: Business, 960; Editorial,'2414.
unications not to exceed 300 words,
i, the signature not necessarily to ap-
print, but as an evidence of faithr, and
of events .will be published in The
t the discretion of the Editor, if left
aied to the office.
ied communications will receive no
ation. No manuscript will be re-j
fnless the writer incloses postage. I
)aily does not necessarily endorse the
ts expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Roeser..........Managing Editor

Carey.............News'
llar .................City
-. --'A sso ciate
F. MYcAllister.....Feature
Ehlbert........Telegraph
Landis.............port
eClark........Women's
tjernsey..........Women's

Editor
Editor
Editor'
Editor
Editor
4Editor,
Editor
Editor

Sbinkman....... ..:.Dramai
.l...Music
le . . . xchange
4olzl .......... Literary

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

ISSUE EDITORS
R. Slusser Paul G. Weber.
lSherwood Efdgar L. Rice
X. Hitchcock J. P. Hart
William Clarkson
RE:PORTE RS
H. Adams John E. McManis
B. Marshall C. H. Murchison
Ellis M ry D. Lane
LSchermerhorn olfn I. 'Dakin
W. Brown Logan Trumbull
erson Swart Stewart Baxter
Srozier Muriel B., Baufnan
BUSINESS STAFF
Makinson ........Business Manager

bele.....Asst. Business
Gaines...Asst. Business
Fevre....Asst. Business
.tzinger...Asst. Business
Major....Asst. Business

Manager
Manager
Manager
Manageri
Manager

aneu . 4chofnner..Asst ..BusinessAl anager
SENIOR STAFF
rk B. Covell Edward Priehs, Jr.
bert E. McKean Henry Whiting II
rge A. :cadwell J. Duane Miller
ynard A. Newton R. A. Sullivan
JUNIOl STAFF
it P., Sch~nider "Isabelle Farnum
aold P. Lindsay Geo. R. Strimbeck, Jr.
rper Moore Arthur 'L. Glazier
James A Kennedy, Fr.
FRIDAY, MA, 16, 1919.
ne Editor-Thornfon W. Sargent, Jr.
THE DAILY NEEDS MEN
t this time each year The Daily
is itselftn a nost trying position.
n tempted by the warm, pleasant,
umer-like days to slacken their ef-
ts have mysteriously dropped from
tstaff.';
rie Daily is one of Michigan's in-
;utio'ns just as much as Varsity foot-
1. In fact, it is more exacting in
demands, for it is not seasonal, but
st make its appearance every morn-
. It represents the best efforts of
dents who voluntarily sacrifice their
We and energy to support it.
rhe Daily stands foremost among
lege papers. It has long been rec-
ilzedaft a leader of the collegiate
a both in the East and in the West.
d it has attained this position of
dership not by the work of one or
> men, but by the combined efforts
a staff which puts The Daily above
rything, which works in perfect
rmony and co-operation for its sake.
Phe men who come out now to work
remainder of the semester will
re the advantage of knowing the or-
iization of the paper when the Uni-
sity opens in the fall.
Lt this very moment The Daily is in
Id of more men; men from all
fools angl colleges on the campus;
n who are willing to learn and men
h experience; men who have their
iversity at heart and take pride in
dng Michigan rank among the best.
TO ERR IS HUMAN-
'o err is human-but to deliberately
the studying of a subject go from
ek to week until the semester is
r will not bring forgiveness.
to err is human-but to try to give
ecitation in class when you do not
ow anything about the subject is
rer forgiven by a professor.
ro err is human-but to copy from a
ssmate's paper will only bring down
ath from fellow students and the
tructor.
ro err is human-but to be constant-
trying' to tell the instructor how
.ch you know about the subject be-
e he has called on you will only
ng ridicule sooner or later.
Po err is human-but to start closing
ar book, putting away your fountain
, 'and reaching for your hat five
antes before the hour is up, is not
gotten by the professor.
ro err is human-but to put your
t on the bench in front of you when
re is a person sitting in it, is not
gotten by that student after he
nds a half hour taking the dirt off
coat that was formerly on your
>es.
ro err is human-and to forgive is
due--but there are exceptions to all
es.
Whale stops U. S. Cruiser.-Detroit
ws headline. It would have been
good idea for Germany to have used

PROET G IRTICLE
BELIEVES WORK OF AMERICAN
SOLDIERS APPRECIATED BY
FRENCH.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Through the medium of The Daily I
wish to protest against an article ap-
pearing recently in the Detroit Free
Press, credited to Lieut. Eugene Rovil-
hian of the Michigan faculty. I hope
that Mr. Rovillian has been mis-quot-
ed, for such an article is unworthy of
one who has enjoyed the advantages
of America and to whom Amecia is
sufficiently attractive to cause his im-
mediate return upon the cessation of
hostilities.
His "compliment" paid the American
soldier is decidedly a back-handed one
and must be offensive to all Michigan
men who saw service in France. Like-
wise his statement that "only about
250,000 Americans participated in the
fighting" bears investigation. He needs
but to refer to the casuality list to
see that the killed and wounded al-
most equal that number.
Fortunately Mr. Rovillian's appraiseal
of the American effort is not the uni-
versal opinion of the French and I am
happy to say that close association
with French officers during a period of
service with a French unit convinced
me that the majority fully appreciated
the part we played, not only in men,
but in supplies.
In "the daik days of the 1918 spring,"
the coming of the Americans was de-
voutly prayed for and had they not
arrived when they did, it is exceed-
ingly doubtful if the Allies could have
lasted another six months. The brav-
ery that Mr. Rovillian said cost the
Americans a thousand men when it
would have cost the French one hun-
dred, was well ,rewarded in bringing
the war to a closeat least six months
sooner than the most ardent optim-
ist had dared to hope. A little more
consideration for the land of his adop-
tion and likewise for the feelings of
the alumni of the University of Mich-
I igan would be in better tast.
EMMETT F. CONNELY, '15.
I Iomen I
_I
Several positions are open to girls
who would like to wait table at sum-
mer hotels or resorts in northern
Michigan. For further information ap-
ply to Miss Louise Potter in Barbour
gymnasium.
Girls of the Adams house will play
the Caryatides at baseball at 5 o'clock
Friday afternoon on the field opposite
Barbour gymnasium. The Theta Phi
Alphas will play the Delta Delta Del-
tas at 5 o'clock on Palmer field.
Jiaazine Review
"The Bells of the University of Mich-
igan" in the May issue of the Alum-
nus is an article that delves into mus-
ty records to relate in detail the story
of Michigan's chimes. It tells how
in the early days the students were
called to classes by a bell rung by
hand and traces and about the evolu-
tion of this lowly implement down to
the splendid chimes.of today. Byron A.
Finney, '71, reference librarian emer-
itus, is the writer of this bit of his-
tory.
The "Event and Comment" depart-
ment of the Alumnus covers in a com-
pact form all the more important hap-
penings to the University during the
last month, such as Dean James R.
Angell's refusal of the presidency,
the passage of the appropriations bill
and its effects on the policy of the
University.
Prof. Francis W. Kelsey has written
an explanation of the project for the
transformation of the "cat-hole" into

an open-air theater. The plans for
the new University hospital are set
'forth in detail. The new children's
department in the Homoeopathic hos-
pital is fully discussed.
Several pages are devoted to the
enumeration of the many new pro-
motions among the faculty and the re-
cent changes: and additions, of which
there are several.
FORMER GEOLOGY PROFESSOR
DISCHARGED FROM ARMY
Will Return to University Next Fall
After Meteorological Work in
Texas
D. F. MacLachlan, formerly assist-
ant professor in the department of
geology at the University, has recent-
ly been discharged from the service.
He was engaed in the meteorological
work in the army camps in Texas.
PrsA ror MacLachlan passed through
Ann Atr bo r on his way to Detroit,
where ]ie is to do some special work
this summer. He will return to the
University next semester.
Barbara Marquis Goes to Sheridan
Barbara Marquis, ex-'20, a graduate
of the school of occupational theraupy
in Detroit, is now taking up this work
at Fort Sheridan. Miss Marquis was
at Michigan in 1917 and 1918. After
leaving here she took up the study of
vocational training.
Advertis Ia The Daily.--Ady.

Dngineering News
Students of chemical engineering
4 and other juniors and seniors who
desire to. do so will take a trip of
inspection to Detroit Saturday for the
purpose of viewing manufacturing es-
tablishments of interest in their
work.
The party under the direction of
Prof. W. S. Wood will leave Ann Ar-
bor at 7 o'clock via the Michigan Cen-
tral. The first plant to be visited will
be the Detroit Chemical Works, where
sulphur and nitric acid are made.
The Canadian Salt Plant at Wind-
sor is next, where salt manufacture
by the grainer and vacuum process
will be studied. The last place, the
electrolytic plant of the Canadian Salt
company, will be visited for the in-
spection of bleach and caustic soda
making.
A fellowship in engineering is open
to graduate students and preferably
to those who have had some experi-
ence. This is offered by Ohio State
university and carries with it an
emolument of $500.
Applications will be accepted until
June 1, upon which date they will
be judged. Letters should be ad-
dressed to -the dean of engineering
at Ohio State university, Columbus, O.,
stating all the qualifications of the
person.
The position calls for 16 credit
hours a week to be put in, of which
at least eight must be spent in orig-
inal research, the remainder to be
taken in relative studies. At the end
of'a year the degree of Master of Sci-
ence will be granted providing that
the work and a satisfactory thesis are
done.
Dues of '21E class members may be
paid at the desk in the corridor of the
Engineering building. If unpaid they
increase 50 per cent with each year.
Lieut. Allen O. Beach, ex-'19E, who
has recently returned from overseas,
where he was attached to brigade
headquarters of the 62nd F. A., was
in Ann Arbor Thursday afternoon. He
is planning to enter the University
at the beginning of the summer ses-
sion.
Through the efforts of A. Mansfield
Dudley, '02E, the Westinghouse Elec-,
tric and Manufacturing company, dur-
ing the past year has presented the'
University with two pieces of equip-I
ment, a new alternating current ad-
justable speed computator and an old
Weston direct current generator. The
latter is of no practical value, but due

MethodistChurch
Saturday, 7:30 P. M.
"The Fighting Roosevelts"
Thursday, May 22
Sir Johnston Forbes-Robertson in

to the fact that it was one of the first
types of generators manufactured it
has been placed on exhibit in the Elec-
trical museum.
Results are important. Advertise in
The Daily.-Adv.
If you don't go to the
Concert, don't feel down-
hearted. See
Mary Pickford In
;TlheLittle' Ameriean"

I

"tThe Passing of the
Third Floor Back"I
May 31stI
Students always welcome
SEE The NEW, PIPES
At The
City Cigar Store
110 E. Huron St.
Use Wahl
Tempoint
FOUNTAIN PENS
AND
Eve rsh arp
Perfect Point Pencils

New Books of Unusual Interest
Hobbs-The World War and Its Consequences...............$2.50
Sir Oliver Lodge-Christopher ....................... . 2.00
Ibanez-Shadow of the Cathedral........ ................1.90
Ibanez-Blood and Sand ....................................1.90
Sp r o B lh vs . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.50
Conrad-Arrow of Gold............................1.50
Bennett Arnold-The Roll Call ............................1.50
Bojer-The Great Hunger.......................... .. ....1.60
Kauffman-Victorious... ... ........................ ....1.75
Stephen Leacock-The Hohenzollern's in America .............1.25
Hough-The Sage-Brushers...... ..................... 1.50
Conner-Sky Pilot in No Man's Land ..........................1.50
V UNIVERSITY
W A HR SBOOK STORE
For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.

Farmers &
101-105 S. Main

Mechanics Bank
330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

L 4

Golf Suits

Riding Vree.hes

:4

...

I'

D. 13. GRENNAN

ASKA US

f

Custom Tailor

Oriinal Designs

$1.00 to $4.00

Now Open for Business

. H. L SWITZER & CO.

310 South State Street

14 Nickels Arcade

I I

HOMER SINGS

THE RAINY
SEASON IS HERE
IS
WITH
2700IN

TONIGHT

IN

HILL AUDITORIUM

But

Call Us
A Trial Solicited
INDEPENDENT

Homer will Sing Always
in

TAXI CON

I

I

Your Home

r +r
f Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping

if you habe a

VICTROLA AND
HOMER RECORDSa

Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.

AMONG OUR HOMER RECORDS IN STOCK ARE:

"My Heart Ever Faithful"
Faust-When All Was YoU a"
Orfeo ed Euridice-"I Have Lost My Euridice"
Gioconda- 'Angelic Voice"
Elijah-"O Rest in the Lord"i
Messiah-"He Shall Find His Flock"
Huguenots-"Noble Sirs, I Salute You"
"Banjo Song"
Aida-"The PriestsAssemble" (Duet with Caruso)
Trovatore-"Home to Our Mountain" (Duet with Caruso)
Aida-"Neath the Chances of Battle" (Duet with Gadski) I
Madame Butterfly-"Duet of the Flowers" (with Farrar)
"Whispering hope"-(Duet with Gluck)

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8 :io a.
m., and hourly to 8:io p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars--7:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Fix.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6 :oo a. m., 9 :5 a.
mn. and every two hours" to 9:o5 p. in., 10:50
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:43 p. in., 12:2o
a. m., i :zo a. m.. and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
11:20 p. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. $.
Phone 1620-R

S14 s. state St.

Ann Arboi

LET US DE./7'IONSTRA TE THESE JIASTERPIECES

tr~utversit A fI~c i4oue

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $50,000.00
Resources.......$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

I

William aub aayjnarb

I

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