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May 16, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-16

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6.- VV .4
rLTIED; P
SHO WER

YTHER
PROBABLY

Sir 4j~an

j1Iaixg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIE
SERVICE

1

VOL. XXIX. No. 160. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1919. PRICE THREE CENT

CHORUS OF 250
FEATURES SECOND
TIA NCRT
STANLEY'S OWN COMPOSITION
SUNG AS OPENING
NUMBER
ALCOCK AND HACKETT
PLEASE WITH SOLOS

Famous
"Ode

Artists Render
to Musie"; Choral
Difficult

Hadley's
Parts

(By Edna Lucking Apel)
Prof. Albert A. Stanley proved him-
self once again an able composer as
well as conductor when he presented
his perfectly tained Choral union in
his own composition, "Fair Land of
Freedom," last evening in Hill audi-
torium. Miss Lois Johnston, soprano
and Robert Dieterle, \'18, baritone, ably
carried the solo parts in his number.
The second choral work on the pro-
gram was Hadley's "Ode to Music,"
a work divided into ten main sec-
tions, each illustrating some phase of
music's expressiosn. The orchestral
pretude establislies an atmospheric
setting which heralds the chorus, lead-
ing a lovely melody for sopranos, fol-
lowed by the solo voices of Lois John-
s'ton, soprano; Merle Alcock, contral-
to; Arthur Hackett, tenor; and Gustaf
Holmquist, bass.
Holmquist in Solo
The deep, powerful voice of Mr.
Holmquist was well-suited to the bar-
itone solo following in the second sec-
tion. In the "Play Song," the sopranos
and altos figure In the roles of child-
ren in alternate broadly-phrased mel-
odies. This is followed by the "Sleep
Song," and in turn by the spirited, en-
ergetic "Hunting Song of male
voices.
Number VI is a Minuette dance
form in E flat major for women's
voices, followed by a brilliant soprano
waltz, which' was sung by Miss Johns-
ton. She sang with a simple directness
and lack of affectation, her voice dis-
playing a sympathetic and resonant
quality of bell-like clearness.
Chors Sings of War
After this solo, the chorus suddenly
shouts in fortissimo, "Break off!
Dance no more!" and the War Chorus
is ushered in by forceful trumpet calls.
The terrors of battle are emphasized
by a vivid treatment of orchestral
forces ending in a compelling lima
of victory.
The bursts of triumph are checked
by the quartette's sniging "Oh, Music,
Mourn the Dead," recalling the mar-
tyrs of the victory, and concluding
with the closing strains of "The Star
Spangled Banner."
Symphony Poetical
The Symphony and the Iris follow-
ing are highly poetical, while the mas-
sive choral-like ending of Part X, the
"Sea and Shore" with its alternations
of solo voices chorus concludes the
program in a swee#ing climax.
Due to war conditions the Choral
union is smaller than those of former
years, possessing only 250 members,
but the added enthusiasm displayed by
the present members makes up for the
deficiency in numbers.
PONTIAC CLUB TO ENTERTAIN
HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS TODAY
To give prospective Michigan stu-
dents from Pontiac an insight into
University life, the Pontiac sectional
club will entertain the senior class of
Pontiac high school today and to-
morrow. The effort is made in the en-
deavor to interest more senior high
school students in Michigan as their
fture univerity
Besides attending the spring games
the boys will be shown the different
things of interest about the campus. A
get together meeting will be held at 7
o'clock tonight at Lane hall and a ban-
quet tomorrow noon at the Union.
Clarence Patterson, '19, is toastmas-
ter of the banquet which 50 men have
signified their intention of attending.
Prof. Morris Tilley, Supt. G. L. Jenner
of Pontiac, Mr. Edgar J. Ebbles of De-
troit, and Earl Miles, '21, president of
the club, will speak,

FRESHMAN SPREAD
COMMITTEE NAMED
Cornelia Clarke, '21, was elected as-
sistant chairman of the Junior Girls'
play committee for next year at the
meeting of sophomore women Wed-
nesday afternoon in Barbour gymna-
sium, This name was omitted from
the list which appeared yesterday.
Judiciary council nominations for
the freshman class were Eleanor Ste-
phenson and Isabella Swan. The fresh-
man spread committee is as follows:
Norma Judson, chairman, Marion Ack-
erman, Gertrude Boggs, Helen Bishop,
Helen Feetham, Esther Kennedy,
Ruth Minor, Caroline Napier, Helen
McInto'sh, Bess Hammett, Dorothy
Samuelson, Dorothy Spaulding, Doris
Sprague, Laura Snyder, Isabella Swan,
Eleanor Stephenson, Hazel Stors,
Helen Thorpe, Frances Weimar, Bertha
Wright.-
MATINEE AND EVENING
CONCERTSGIVEN TODAY
GABRILOWITSCH AND HOMER THE
ARTISTS ON RESPECTIVE
PROGRAMS
. .
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, conductor of
the Detroit Symphony orchestra and
pianoforte virtuoso, will present the
Brahm's Concerto in B flat at the third
May Festival concert at 2:30 o'clock
this afternoon in Hill auditorium.
Famous Pianist to Appear
Gabrilowitsch is easily one of the
greatest of modern pianists and the
number he has chosen requires a tech-
nical ability such as only an artist of
this caliber can furnish. It will em-
brace the four movements: Allegro
non troppo; Allegro appassionato;
Andante; and Allegretto grazioso.
The two orchestral numbers by the
Chicago Symphony orchestra for this
concert will be the Bach Suite No. 3,
in D Major comprising the Overture;
Air; Gavotte I and II; Bourree; and
Gigue; and Beethoven's Symphony No.
3, "Eroica" in E flat. The latter num-
ber is divided into an Allegro con-
brio; Marcia funebre; Scherzo; and
Finale.
Homer Is Evening Soloist
Genuine enthusiasm is bound to
greet the appearance of Mme. Louise
Homer, contralto, one of Ann Arbor's
favorites, when she appears as soloist
for tonight's concert. In addition to
a voice of rare quality, Madame Hom-
er possesses a radiant personality
which wins her audience even be-
fore she has uttered a note.
She has attained a'leading position
among contraltos and is a regular vis-
itor to Ann Arbor. Her numbers on
the program will be the Bach aria,
"My Heart Ever Faithful," "Connal tu
le pays" and "Gavotte" from "Mignon,"
and the "O don fatale" aria from Ver-
di's "Don Carlos."
Orchestra Opens Program
The orchestra will open the pro-
gram with Dvoraks overture, "Carne-
val." Mozart's Symphony in G mino,
and "The Enchanted Forest" by d'Indy
will be other orchestral numbers and
the program will be fittingly closed
with the entrancing "Sylvia" suite by
Delibes. This last number embraces
a Prelude - Les Chassereusses; In-
termezzo et Valse lente; Pizzicati; and
Cortege de Bacchus.
SENIOR SOCIETY ELECTS 10'
GIRLS TO MEMBERSHIP
The spring elections of Senior so-
ciety resulted in the election of the
following girls to membership: Edna
Apel, Margaret Spain, Marian Ames,
Elie Erley, Gretchen Jones, Anna
May Yorks, Ida Gratton, Florkbel Ellis,
Georgia Davis, and Dorothy Comfort.
Initiation will be held Monday, May
26, at Helen Newberry residence.

DAILY MEN WANTED
Three or four men are wanted
to work on the editorial side of
The Daily. They should see the
city editor between 1 and 3
o'clock today.
.I

UA RTERMS IMPOSSIBLE
Gives German Delegation Text of Notes
Sent to Clemencean in
Protest
EBERT REITERATES STAND
AGAINST PROPOSED TERMS
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, May 15. - Count Von
Brockdorff-Rantzau, the head of the
German peace delegation, in commu-
nicating to the members of the Ger-
man delegation the text of three notes
he sent to Premier Clemenceau, point-
ed out that the peace treaty in. its
present form could not be accepted,
and could not be signed because it was
impossible to fulfill its terms.
Sign Only Fulfillments
Dispatches from Versailles reporting
the count's action add that he told
the German delegation it would sign
nothing it did not intend to fulfill.
The delegation, he continued, would
endeavor to improve the treaty and
make its signing possible.
Berlin, May 15.-Frederick Evert,
the German president, in a statement
made to the newspaper Vorwaerts has
reiterated his opposition to the peace
terms submitted by the Entente, de-
claring them unreconcilible with con-
science and reason and insisting that
they must be fundamently corrected.
Above all, practical negotiations were
necessary, he declared, and these
would result in the attainment of a
worthy peace if a return were made
to the 14 points.
Will Hold Out Hope
"As long asrone remnant of hope
remains that reason will triumph"
continued President Ebert, "we will
not speak our last word, but should
it prove that this mailed-fist peace is
to be imposed upon us, we shall have
to make our decisions.
"Today I still hope that the attempt
will not be made to extract from the
German nation an assent which
would be nothing but a lie born of
desperation. We must keep faith with
our countrymen who are threatened
with suffocation by foreign violence
and be ready to carry out the hard-
est resolve."
ADD NEW FEATURES
TO FROSH FROLIC
Appetizing refreshments, unusual
features, and unique favors are only a
few of the things by which the so-
cial committee expects to distinguish
from like entertainments of the fresh-
man class, the Frosh Frolic to be giv-
en tonight in Barbour gymnasium.
The gymnasium is a mass of color
in preparation for the dance.. Ferns
and palms have been tastefully placed
around the hall to conceal any of the;
harsh outlines of the building.
"Henri" and his colleagues of the
Ponchartrain orchestra, Detroit's best,
will start promptly at 9 o'clock to play
for the dance, continuing until a late
hour of the night.
Elaborate programs will be handed
out at the door. Ice cream, cake, and
punch will serve as refreshments for
the Frolic and will be served through-
out the evening. As upperclassmen.
have been invited to attend the dance
it is expected that the remaining 50
tickets which are on sale a the Un-
ion for $2.20 will be dispo ed of by
noon. White trousers and blue coats
are in vogue for the men.
COMPLETE CASUALTY LIST AN-
NOUNCED BY WAR DEPARTMENT
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 15.-Revised fig-
ures made public today by the war
department showed that the total cas-
ualties of the American Expeditionary
Forces, during the war, were 28,044.
Battle deaths numbered 48,909 and the

total of wounded was placed at 237,-
135.
In the 32d division there were 2,898
deaths in battle, 10,986 were wounded
and 156 were taken prisoners.
Round Up Club to Hold Dinner
Round-ups wil hold their annual
dinner dance 7:30 until 2 Friday night
at the Union. There will be special
music, decorations, and favors. Sixty
couples will attend.

TREASURERS MUST
SUBMIT ACCOUNTS
Treasurers of classes and All-Cam-
pus organizations must submit their
accounts together with their balance
sheets, to Registrar Arthur G. Hall
for auditing before June 15, unless, by
special permit, an extension of time is
granted to any such organization.
This requirement was made a necess-
ity by the action of the Board of Re-
gent, some years ago.
Registrar Hall stated yesterday that
he believed the accounts have been
kept somewhat loosely during the first
part of this year, the reason being that
oraginzations and classes were great-
ly disorganized. In spite of this hand-
icap the same rules regarding audit-
ing will be in effect this year. Letters
also informing the treasurers of the
requirement will be mailed within. the
next two or three weeks.
'C-5 BREAKS MOORINGS1
DELAYS ATHIANTIC TRIP
DESTROYER SENT TO BRING DOWN
EMPTY "SHIP" WITH
GUNS
(By Associated Press)
St. Johns, Newfoundland, May 15.-
Plans of the United States navy for a
trans-Atlantic flight by a dirigible re-
ceived a serious lt this afternoon
[when the giant "blimp" C-5 burst
from her moorings in a gale, and was
swept out to sea shortly after she ar-
rived from Montauk Point, after be-
ing in the air continuously for 25
hours and 45 minutes.
Destroyer Sent in Pursuit.
The destroyer Edwards immediately
set out in pursuit with orders to
bringthe big gas bag down with an-
ti-air artillery fire if necessary. Even
if the Edwards is able to rescue the
airship before sbme serious misfortune
befalls her, it will require some time
to repair the damage which will re-
sult from her fall into the ocean.
Washington, May 15.-Navy depart-
ment officials were greatly disappoint-
ed upon receiving information of the
accident to the C-5 which has abrupt-
ly ter-minated plans for sending the di-
rigible across the Atlantic, in the
wake of the seaplanes starting from
Trepassey Bay. It was said immedi-
ately upon recepit of the official re-
ports that'the attempt to cross the At-
lantic with a dirigible of the same type
would not be abadoned but that an-
other ship would be made ready to take
the place of the C-5, which probably
will be a total loss.
No Casualties
The official report to the Navy De-
partment reads: "Dirigible C-5 broke
adrift from moorings Pleasantville.
Rip cord broke. No one aboard. No
casualties. U. S. S. Edwards proceed-
ing in northeasterly direction with in-
structions to bring down with anti-
aircraft fire."

U. S. YIELDING FIUME ST AND
' (By Associated Press)
Paris, May 15.-Following a
meeting at the war ministry it
was announced that te Ae-
can delegation was yielding in
its position concerning Fume.
I Premier Clemencea received{I
the Italian premier, Vitrio Or-
lando, and the foreign minister,
Baron Sonnonino, at the war min-
istry today. No announcements
were made concerning the au-
dience.
First Freshman
Step At Armory
Starting promptly at 9 o'clock to-
night in the Armory, which is especial-
ly decorated fo the oceasion, the grand
march for the first annual Freshman
Step will be led by Claude A. Van Pat-
ten '22E, president of the frosh engin-
eers and by, 'iss Tesabel 'Worden, of
the University School of Music.
Until the chimes ring out the hour
of one, a bevy of lithesome figures, the
men in summer formal, will dance
lightly over the floor to the music of
Ike Fisher's eight piece orchestra.
Throughout the evening novelty fe-
tures will surprise the guests.
In one corner of the spacious hail
refreshments and cool drinks will be
served and shading palms and gay
flowers will form cozy nooks for those
weary of dancing.
The chaperons will be: Dean W. H.
Butts and Mrs. Butts; Prof. W. C.
Hoad and Mrs. Hoad, and Prof. J. H.
Cissell and Mrs Cissel. Of the 130
tickets practically all had been sold
Thursday.
PRESIDENT NAMES
L I T COMMITTEE
President Harry B. Hutchins ap-
pointed Thursday the literary com-
mittee which will confer with a like,
body from the engineering college as
to the feasibility of making the engin-
eering course one of five years, dur-
ing which time two degrees would be
received.
The committee consists of: Dean
John R. Effinger, chairman; Prof. I.
Leo Sharfman, and Prof. H. M. Ran-
dall. Owing to the absence of Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley from the city, he
has not yet named the three members
which will represent the engineers.
Dean Cooley is expected back Sun-
day when it is thought that he will
make the appointments. As soon as
the personnel of the committee is
known, active work will begin on the
problem. Some years ago a solution
was offered which was accepted by
the engineering faculty but rejected
by the literary college.
VOCATIONAL WORK FOR GIRLS
AT NEWBERRY HOUSE, DETROIT
Vocational work will be given this
summer at the old Newberry house in
Detroit, provided 10 or 15 University
women will take the course Mrs. Joy,
director of occupational theraupy in
Detroit, will be in Ann Arbor the lat-
ter part of this month to interest girls
in the trainig school.
BAND BOUNCE NEEDS TALENT
Any one wishing to try out
for the Band Bounce with skirts,
songs, and other comedy acts
report to John Kasberger, '19,
this afternoon at 3 o'clock in
room 205, Mason hall. A couple I
of good acts are still needed for
the Band Bounce which is to be I
given May 27. I

SOPHOMORES CROWD PHYSICS
LECTURE ROOM AT PEP
MEETING
RALPH GAULT SPEAKS
FOR STUDENT COUNCIL
Lambert and McClintock Encourage
Class Sport and Campus
Activities
As the first step in deciding the su-
premacy of the present underclasses
on the campus the tug-of-war will be
"pulled off" at 4 o'clock this afternoon
across the river near the Wall street
bridge.
Sophomores crowded the West
Physics lecture room Thursday night
at their pep meeting. Ralph E. Gault,
'21L, president of Student council, pre-
sided at the meeting and spoke on
behalf of the council. "All that the
council asks of you men of '21," he
said, "is that you don't congregate in
mobs and destroy property if you deem
it necessary to show a freshman his
place. We leave the rest to you."
Wants All Out
"Paddie" Lambert, '19L spoke to the
sophomores about entering into class
and campus activities and the value
of them. Jim McClintock, '21L, urg-
ed every man to be on hand for each
of the contests and to bring any other
sophomore with him who had not at-
tended the pep meeting. "The fresh-
men need a trimming," he said. "Get
out, and give, it to them. Organize."
Carl T. Hogan, .20E, chairman of
the Spring games committee, explain-
ed the games to the men. Sophomores
will meet at the gymnasium at 3:15
o'clock Friday afternoon and the
freshmen will meet at the flag pole
at the same time. Every man will be
daubed with paint and under the lead-
ership of their captains will march at
3:30 to the river. No man will be
allowed to contest if he does notwear
tennis shoes.
20 Minute Tugs
Three tugs will be pulled by the
teams of different weights, each to last
20 minutes. One revolver shot will
start the pull-and two shots will stop
it. The height of the river is so ab-
normal this year that neither of the
teams will be allowed to pull its rival
into the river. "Without a doubt,"
said Hogan, "some of the men will get
wet but we cannot take chances on
having the men over their depth in the
water." The class that wins two out
of the three pulls will take the ope
home.
The sophomores elected A. o. Cuth-
bert to captain the tug-of-war and
Jack Williams to lead them in the
bag rush. Assistants will be appoint-
ed today. Angus G. Goetz, '22M, foot-
ball captain elect, is to be the referee
for the tug-of-war.
Games Count Points
The victories scored in the Spring
games will be credited to the classes
in number of points. The tug-of-war
will count,.three points, one for each
pull. The cane spree will count one,
the relay races two, and the bag rush
three. The class winning the greAtest
number of the nine points will be the
victors.
The enthusiasm displayed at the
freshman meeting Wednesday and then
last night atrthe sophomore gathering
bids fair for a hard fought, sports-
manlike contest this afternoon.
Following are the entries for this
afternoon:
FRESHMEN ENTRIES
Frosh Lightweights
L. W. Schumm, F. W. Swartz, J. L.
Stinson,. R. C. Baumnan, W. .
Schwartz, A. H. eele, G. E.. Clark,
J. M. Hade, J. Latham, iR. F. Barrie,
P. E. 'Ringer, T. G. Dougla, F. Lee,
G. Waite, A. A. Brown, R. T. Cooper,
W. R. Dudley, B. Fruehauf, B. Van
Dusen, P. V. Barmen, W. T. Sisler, G.
F. Kalmbach, J. E. Bacon, B O. Dan-
forth, E. L. White, J. T. Rwlings, M.
B. Eaton, S.. Sarasohn, C. B. Car-
rol, A. L. Gleason, N. C. Draewell, W.

W. Michaels, J. G. Hill, B. W. Hun-
gerford, H. B. Grundy, W. H. Gallogly,
(Continued on Page Six)

FIRST STEP IN-SETTLING OF CLASS
SUPREMACY WILL BE DECIDED THIS
AFTER, NOON BY TUGC-Of-WAR coNsTESi

GIRLS' FIELD DAY
SET FOR MAY

261

Field day, the final event of the
year for the Women's Athletic asso-
ciation, will take place on the after-
noon of May 26 at Palmer field. Lan-
tern night, an old Michigan tradition,
will be revived this year and will fol-
low the field contests. .
Tennis, and archery tournaments
and the class championship baseball
game will be followed by May pole
dancing, a special feature of field day
this year. After the contests a bas-
ket supper will be served around bon-
fires.
As a continuation of the field events,
the women of the senior class, in caps
and gowns, will form a lantern march.
These lanterns, symbolizing torches of
learning, will be passed on to the ju-
niors. This celebration is a revival
of an old tradition discontinued sev-
eral years ago.
A CHICAGO-NEW YORY AIR MAIL
SERVICE IN ACTIVE OPERATION
Chicago, May,15.-Another aeroplane
for the Chicago, New York air mail
service arrived yesterday afternoon,
landing in Grant park. "Jack" Miller
brought the machine from Bryan, O.,
flying the 181 miles in one hour and
45 minutes.

U U

Tickets are on
sale
at the Union
to the Campus

DETROIT'S BEST The Ponchartrain**r**es*
with "Henry" himself at the Violin
Tonight at the Frosh Frolic, Summer Formal
9 P. M. at Barbour Gym Refreshments, Favors and Features

Tickets are on
sale
to the Campus,
at the Union

$2.20

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