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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 13, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1919.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every, morning except Monday
ring the universitby year by the Board in
:ontrol of Stdent Publcatons.
£EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
o the use for republication of all news dis-
iathes credited to it or not otherwise credited
A this paper and also the local news pub-
shed herein.
Entered at the postoftice at Ann Arbor,
dcligan, as second class matter.
Subcriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5.
Ofees: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 6o; Editorial, 2414.
Commumcations no to exceed 305 words,
I signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
>ear in print, but as an evidence o faith, and
antices of events will be published in The
Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
It or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
:ons deration. No manuscript will be re-
;urned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
entiinents expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Clarence Roeser ...........Managing Editor
Earry M. Carey.............News Editor
ruce Millar...... ....City Editor
Milton Marx...Associate Editor
rhomas F. McAllister......Feature Editor
Miark K. Ehlbert .........Telegraph Editor
David B. Landis..............Sport Editor
Marguerite Clark.........Women's ditor
Martha Guernsey.... ....Women's Editor
Paul A. Shinkman.........Dramatic Editor
Edna Apel.................Music Editor
Ruth Dae. ..... ..Exchange Editor
erard 'bohi.... ...Literary Edtor
ISSUE EDITORS
Eerbert R. Slusser Paul G. Weber
Renaud Sherwood Edgar L. Rice
:gh W. Hitchcock J. P. Hart
William Clarkson
REPORTERS-
rhomas H. Adams John E. MManis
Richard B Marshall C. H. Murchison
rene Ellis Mary D. Lane
Katrina Schermerhorn John I. Dakin
Arthur W. Brownt Logan Trumbull
R Emerson Swart Steart Baxter
,arie Crozier Muriel E. Bauman
BUSINESS STAFF
Harold Makinson.........Business Manager
Agnes L. Abele......Asst. Business Manager
6eGrand A. Gaines...Asst. Business Manager
ETtm. M. LeFevre....Asst. Business Manager
lm. A. Leitinger...Asst. Business Manager
Donald M. Major....Asst. Business Manager
Donnell R. Schoffner..Asst. Business Manager
SENIOR STAFF
Mark B. Coveal Edward Pries, Jr.
.obert E.'McKean Henry Whiting II
3eorge A. Cadwell J. Duane Miller
Maynard A. Newton R. A. Sullivan
JUNIOR STAFF
Curt P. Schneider Isabelle Farnum
earold P.Liidsay Geo.R. Strinbeck, Jr.
larper 'Moore Arthur L. Glazier
James. A. Kennedy, Jr
TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1919.
Issue Editor-John I. Dakin.
There will be a meeting of the entire
ditoral staff at 5 o'clock today in the
eeportorlal rooms.
THE REAL IDEA OF COLLEGE
How many in the outside world
:now university life as it really is?
f one were to get his idea of college
alone from stories, or more particular-
y from the motion picture how near
he actual truth would it be?
The ,moving picture college always
as a beautiful campus, through which
eantifully dressed girls walk with
aultlessly dressed men-the latter us-
ally In white trousers, dark coats,
nd straw hats. A college man's
oom, in a picture, is beautifully furn-
shed, with pennants from every other
ollege around the walls, and quanti-
lea of sofa pillows strewn about in
rtistic carelessness.
The short story college is exactly the
ame. It is a place full of romance,
vhere young people come to have a
:ood time, sing their college songs,
accompaned by the mandolin-was
here ever a college hero in a short
tory who gould not play the mando-
in?-and who generally enjoy them-
elves and have many reminiscences

o talk over in their later days.
There Is no doubt that this view of
iniversity life is widely held, and there
s equally no doubt that it does a
reat deal of harm. Parents think
hat four years of college, such as they,
ee, is a waste of time. It is perhaps
tl right for a rich man's son or
aughter, who can afford to have a
ood time, but for people who have
heir own way to make in the world,
,nd that as soon as possible, it would
ot do. They do not understand, nor
s it ever explained to them in plausi-
le form, that university training will
elp their children in their life work,
hat more than anything else it will
Ove them a foundation and Lack-
round for their future calling.
Why does not some author write of
ollege life as it really is? Why do not
he motion picture directors, who are
sually so particular as to their de-
ails, give a picture of the serious, the.
eal side of college? Has a lecture
oom, a laboratory, a library scene, or
ny other scene that shows the stu-
lent at his work, ever been reproduc-
d on the screen?
Thinking people have come to re-
:ard the college-trained student as the
Lighest type of citizen. Fiction writers
,nd play producers can do much to
urther the cause of the university by
ahn thir nnhul the rea1 idea of

WAS MICHIGAN INSULTED?

WRITER DECLARES
LA- TERN IS ONE
CRITICISM.

ATTITUDE OF
OF JEALOUS

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
The University of Michigan seems,
judging from the recent attack on her
good name, to be watched with an
eagle eye by the rest of the Conference
schools. The Ohio State Lantern did
more than merely to point out a de-
fect; it showed that Michigan was
watched, that every move was studied
in order to be taken advantage of and
to be made the most of.
Suppose the effect on the visitors at
Michigan was as described; is it good
policy for a sister institution to pub-
lish it broadcast, and with that pub-
lication to go on and praise herself?
The Lantern evidently had some mo-
tive when it deliberately and openly
accused its sister institution and then
at the same time boasted of her own
perfection. Some strong incentive
prompted that writer when he penned
those words. Was it jealousy? Mich-
igan, since her entrance into the Con-
ference, has many times defeated Ohio
States. These defeats could easily
intensify the spirit of rivalry between
the two campuses. Then, the first col-
lege paper to pass along the "boo-hoo"
was Illinois. Illinois was sorely dis-
appointed in the record of Michigan's
football team last fall. Later she was
sadly outclassed at Evanston. Might
not this also have a bearing on the
subject? Could not athletics also play
a prominent part in determining the
campus sentiment at Illinois?
If this is the reason and it is only
logical to suppose that friendly rivalry
existed between the schools, why
should any college paper send repre-
sentatives to another , institution to
look over and criticize conditions
there which at best are only of local
concern? No one from outside the
campus understands the condtions
here, and the Lantern did the good
name of Michigan a deep injustice in
stating what it did.
It can be demonstrated that the con-
ditions described do, not exist. Mich-
igan spirit reflects chivalry and re-
spectfulness, and does not embody un-
worthy ideals of idleness and street-

corner witticism. Michigan men are
marked in their degree by this spirit,
and its intensity is the determining
factor of the conduct of the campus.
The fact that Michigan was attacked
through such a small question makes
it appear that the Lantern was not
sincere. Perhaps it was not meant to
create the opinion it did of the good
name of Michigan; perhaps the Lan-
tern spoke without a thorough under-
standing of the subject.
At any gate, Michigan was, in plain
words, insulted. Let's go, Michigan!
Let's uphold the good name of our
campus and let no misstatements pass
unchallenged!
-M. D. S.
A meeting of the women of the
freshman, sophomore, and junior
classes will be held at 4 o'clock Wed-
nesday afternoon in Barbour gymnas-
ium.
The cabinet of the Y. W. C. A. will
meet at 1 o'clock Wednesday after-
noon in Barbour gymnasium.
Girls interested in leading clubs of
the city Y. W. C. A. this summer should
consult Frances Wesley, '20.
Manuals for the eight-week clubs
have arrived. Girls should call for
these at the Y. W. C. A. office in Bar-
bour gymnasium. There will be no
meeting of those interested in this
work Tuesday night as planned.
Styji s will meet tonight with Mar-
guerite Clark at 205 North Thayer
street.
Seniors and sophomores will prac-
tice baseball at 4- o'clock Tuesday aft-
ernoon on Palmer field.
A baseball game between the Gam-
ma Phi Betas and the Kappa Alpha
Thetas will be played at 5 o'clock
'Tuesday afternoon on Palmer field.
The girls of Kent house will play the
Delta Delta Deltas at the same time
on the field opposite Barbour gymnas-
ium. The baseball league schedule is
posted in Barbour gymnasium.

Regular rehearsal of the Girls' Glee
club will be held at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon instead of 4:30, the time for-
merly announced.
Science has proved that newspaper
adverti :isg pays best. You can rearbc
all the students and faculty through
The Daily.-Adv.

lie

Now Hooks of Unusual Interest
Hobbs-The World War and Its Consequences .................$2.50
Sir Oliver Lodge-Christopher............................... 2.00
Ibanez-Shadow of the Cathedral... . ................... 1.90
Ibanez-Blood and, Sand ....... ..................... ... 1.90
Spargo-Bolshevism......................................1.50
Conrad-Arrow of Gold ........................................ 1.50
Bennett Arnold-The Roll Call..............................1.50
Bojer--The Great Hunger ..................................... 1.60
Kauffman-Victorious...................................... 1.75
Stephen Leacock-The Hohenzollern's in Amgerica...............1,25
Hough-The Sage-Brushers.. ... .. . .. .. . ..... .... . ... 1.50
Conner-Sky Pilot in No Man's Land.... ...........1.50
UNIVERSITPY
WAHiR. S BOOK STORE

Colle ge

Gossip"
hears it whispered around that quan-
tities of good looking new footwear
hale arrived in Mack & C6.'., first floor
shoe department.
If you'll promise not to tell any-
one (except those whom you think
would be interested) she will tell you
a little bit about some of the best
looking ones which are very reason-

J

ALWAYS ASK FOR

or
®

ICE

R aM

Deliciousl{ and Refreshing

ably priced.

.

witor

MEN'S SHOES

Here is a picture of a white pump
made of the new "Reignskin." "The
Gossip" liked it very much, because
its medium heel makes the pump so
comfortable for campus wear. Then
too! the tongue eect is quite the lat-

..
---- +

o Special Merit
Our Stocks complete
No necessity of misfitting
The limit of value at any stated price
We especially invite comparison of our $9.50 and $10.00 Brown calf
and Cordovan Oxfords. Every pair guaranteed satisfactory.

est thing. $4.50.

NOTICE .

Amateur Photographers
On account of the very bad weather, the Contest for
Best Birds Eye View of Campus will continue until
May 3 th. See particulars in Window. '

r .- '-: A

,

LYNDON

- 71.9 N. University

We Feature Fit

AUTOMOBILE STORAGE
BY DAY, WEEK OR MONTH
We have a new three story building where, if requested,
cars can be removed from the first floor. This is the maximum
insurance against their being molested or bumped into by the
usual garage traffic.
UNITED STATES TIRES LUBRICATING OILS
STAEBLER 0. SONS
Service Station 209-2I S. Ashley Phone 686
REO OAKLAND DORT AUTOMOBILES

"The Gossip" particularly admired
these white Reignskin oxfords 'for
their slender French heels and grace-

Walk -Over Boot Shop

115 S. MAIN ST.

ful long
look so

last. She thought they would
well with her fluffy summer

p

-

dresses. $4.50.

P

.. _.----LK
I N
*

.61

Some Inside Facts on
"-Outside Paints
Pure linseed oil and pure white
lead do make a so-called "pure"
paint-but also a poor paint ;
a poor, when you compare its
wearing qualities with the long
.:; lie of

Among the dark shoes she liked
these black kid pumps, because they
had hand turned soles and low heels,
thus combining style with comfort.

Cercle to See War Trophies Today
Cercle Francais members will have
the opportunity today of hearing
Lieut. Eugene Rovillain give a per-
sonal explanation of his collection of
war trophies which have been on dis-
play at Sheehan's book store.
They are requested to meet at 4
o'clock in the Cercle rooms with Mr.
Hackes. From there they will go to
Lieutenant Rovillain's room, where
the relics will be shown.
HELP WANTED? Let The Daily
aid you and the result will be evi-
dent.-Adv.
"Zia JCome of Snergine"
PHONE 2508
207 S. FOURTH AVE.

Try our HOME-MADE
CANDI ES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 8. XaIn St.
DETROIT UNIT-D LINES
Between Dtroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 3o, r19i9)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8: o a.
in., and hourly to 8:1o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. n1. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Found-6:oo a:-in., 9:05 a.
in. and every two hours to 9:o p. m., :1:so
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 1 :45 p. in., 12:20
a. m., r :1o a. in., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. in. and
11:20 p m.
WA KING LOO
Open fron 11:30 a.n to 12:00 p.m.
Phone '1620.E

$6.000

HIGH STANDARD
LIQUID - PAINT

,"'
u,:

m High Standard contains something
besides pure linseed oil and white lead.
The other things used in the making
of this good paint are called "balanc-
ing" materials. They give the paint
elasticity, strength and durability;
these are essential qualities in a paint
that must give best results.
Oswald A.Herz
.As for112 WWASHINGTON ST.
Color"Card Phone 353-F1.

,

314 S. State St:

Ann Arbor

Some unusually good looking ox-
fords in dark mahogany and black
caught her eye, for they were fashion-
ed on a very smart last, and were

Dependable, Scientific, Drugless
EYE
EXAMINATIONS
Phone 590 for appointment
Emil H Arnold
Optometrust 220 S. Main St

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether-hetaccount be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor sayings Dank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $560,000.00
Resources ........$4,000,000.00

priced at only $6 and $7.

I Iftjr/kA 4

Nora

]

I

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