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May 13, 1919 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-13

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PROBABLY SHOWERS
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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
WT ~ANIN IGHTr W1i11

VOL. XXIX. No. 157. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1919. PRICE THREE C

GERMAN PEOPLE'S
PARTY ORGANIZES
AAINST TRATY
MANY CITIES IN GERMANY HIGHLY
AROUSED OVER PEACE
TERMS
YANKEE OFFICERS FIND
COMMON PEOPLE SULLEN
Start Campaign to Incit German
Public Opinion Against
Acceptance
(By Associated Press)
Berlin (via London), May 12.-Big
demonstrations against the signing of
r the peace treaty by Germany were held
today in Berlin, Breslau, Danzig, Koe-
nigsburg, Cassel, and other places. The
demonstrations were organized by the
National People's party. "If this treaty
comes to pass, I will bring up my chil-
dren in hatred," said Deputy Traub,
speaking in Berlin.
Dr. Gustav Stressmann, one of the
People's party leaders, spoke in pro-
test against the demand for the sur-
render of former Emperor William. "If
the Germans complied with it they
would be without name or honor," he
declared.
Berne, Switzerland, May 12, - Press
comment and other news concerning
the peace treaty as sent here by the
German semi-official news agency
suggest that a campaign has been
started to incite German public opin-
ion against acceptance of the treaty,
or perhaps to give Count Von Brock-
dorf-Rantzau manufactured 'popular
support in demands he may make for
alleviation of the peace terms. The
closing of the stock exchanges in Ber-
lin, Frankfort, and elsewhere, and the
government appeal for a "week of
mourning" is taken here to indicate
that there is a well co-ordinated move-
ment to influence the German people.
Private telegrams say all the German
newspapers are discussing the finan-
cial and economic clauses to be impos-
ed and advise against acceptance.
Coblenz, May 12. - The impression
gained by American officers through
talking with Germans regarding the
peace terms is that most of them are
bitter and sullen, but are inclined to
resign themselves to accept any terms,
no matter how harsh. No concrete
plan of action has been suggested in
event the German delegates at Ver-
sailles refuse to sign the treaty.
American. officers say the common
people in the occupied territory have
widely divergent views, but as a
whole they seem more or less stun-
ned, some crushed, but others show a
spirt of bravado.
Several officers are quoted as hav-
ing said that the terms are more se-
vere than they expected but although
it would be necessary for the German
delegate to argue against the condi-
tions imposed they felt there was lit-
tle else left but to sign.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
I MEETING CALLED
Elections of cla committees and

nominations for judiciary council
members of the Women's league will
be made at a meeting of the junior,
sophomore and freshza n w omen at 4
o'clock Wedresday afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
Each class will meet separately, the
elections being conducted by members
of the present judiciary council. Anna'
MacMahon, '19, will conduct the jun-
for meeting. The juniors will elect
a social committee of five anda sen-
Jor play committee, consisting of a
chairman and two members. The.
sophomores led by Marion Ames, '20,
will elect a junior play committee, to
be composed of a chairman, an assist-
ant chairman and three other mem-
bers, and a social committee of five.
Freshmen will elect a spread commit-
tee of twelve. This meeting will be
conducted by Cornelia Clark, '21.
Two nominations for the judiciary
council of the Women's league will be
made by each class. These nominees
will be voted .on later, one representa-

Sahara To Parch
Neophytes Today
Enduring the hellish heat and
parching brick-colored dust of Egypt's
sunny strand, 10 seekers after the rid-
dle of the Sphinx will hazard today the
classic sands of the blistering Sahara.
On they will stagger till not an atom
of moisture is left in their aching bod-
ies.
Many a heartbreaking mirage will
warped imaginations conjure up to
smarting eyes and many a disappoint-
ing palm grove will fade into heat
waves before the promised land is at-
tained by those who possess courage to
survive the ordeals.
At last, their nostrils choked with.
the fiery atmosphererof the Pharoah's
ancient realm and reeling from tor-
ture and fatigue, they will reach the
green oasis to drink in the cooling
water of the spring of knowledge, is-
suing gurgling from the graven lips
of the mystery of the centuries, the
Sphinx.
For this afternoon, the camouflaged
caravan will wend its way through the
streets of Ann Arbor on its journey
to the pyramids, conveying its sopho-
more neophytes, encouraged by basti-
nados, to prostration before the
speechless idol.
ENSIGN, WILL EXPLAIN
WAR ISK INSURACE
MEETING TO BE HELD TODAY FOR
FORMER NAVY
MEN,
Attentipn of all students formerly in
the naval unit or in naval service is
called to the following letter received
by President NIarry B. Hutchins:
"The United States navy is con-
ducting a very active campaign of in-
struction in war risk insurance, and
the conversion of the same to the per-
manent policies to be offered by the
.government at an early date. Men who
are still in the naval service, as well
as those who are being released or
discharged, are being given complete
instruction and are advised as to the
kind of policy to select. These new
policies are offered only to men who
have been insured under the War Risk
Insurance act; Standard policies, the
premium rates of which will be prac-
tically net, are offered to service men.
,Consequently, it is advisable that these
men know the advantages of the new
government insurance before they are
permitted to lapse their War Risk in-.
surance.
"Detailed temporarily at the United
States naval recruiting station, I am
trying to reach all men in and out of
the naval service, either personally or
through newspaper publicity. It is my
desire to give to the men who have
been members of the student naval
training unit at the University an op-
portunity to learn the facts about the
government insurance.
(Signed) -C. S. SORENSON,
Ensign (PC) U. S. N. R. F"
By order of President Harry B.
Hutchins a meeting of all students in-
terested in the matter to be present-
ed by Ensign Sorenson will be held
at 4:10 o'clock Tuesday afternoon,
May 13, in room 101, Economics build-
ing.
REEKIE, EX-19, RETURNS
AFTER 21 MONTHS- OVERSEAS

Sergt. Sherwood Reekie, 'ex-'19, ar-
rived in Ann Arbor Monday for a few
days' visit. Soon after war was de-
clared Sergeant Reekie enlisted in
Base hospital number 17 from Harper
hospital in Detroit. He spent 21
months in France acting as first class
sergeant in charge of the supplies for
his unit.
Immediately upon the arrival of the
unit in this country Sergeant Reekie
was sent to Camp Custer and received
his discharge two days later. He is
not intending to return to the Univer-
sity. He is a member of the Chi Psi
frs ternity.
IMPORTANT COUNCIL MEETING
TO 13V HELD TODAY AT UNION
One of the most important Student
council meetings of the year will be
held at 7 o'clock Tuesday night at the
Union. Matters pertaining to the
Spring games, the underclass pep
meetings, the All-Campus election, and

NOMINATIONS MADE
fOR UNION HEADS

List of Candidates Announced
Nominating Committee
Monday

by

PRESIDENT NOT TO GIVE CONGRESS
FULL TREATY BEFORE HIS RETURN
Paris, May 12.-President Wilson's message which will be cabled to
congress May 19 is expected to be exceptionally short. It is said it will
not submit the complete text of the peace treaty or the proposed Franco-
American engagement for joint military action against Germany, both
these subjects being retained for personal presentation upo.n the Presi-
dent's return.
The President's nearest associates said today they were unable to ac-
count ,for the reports appearing in the French newspapers fixing the date
of June 15 for the President's departure and reports cabled from the United
States that he would reach Washington by June 19. His plans it is said,
have not been changed and are subject to the signing of the peace treaty.

ALL-CAMPUS ELECTION WILL
BE HELD THURSDAY, MAY 22
Nominations for offices in the Midhr
igan Union for the year 1919-20 were
officially announced Monday by the
committee on Union nominations. Be-
low is the complete list from which
appointments to the various offices
will be made when the annual All-
Campus election is held Thursday,
May 22.

Report of Committee on
Nominations

Union

President of Union:
Carl T. Hogan, '20E,
Ralph E. Gault, '21L,
F. Cortez Bell, '21L.
Recording secretary:
G. P. Schafer, '20A,
Edwin S. Larsen, '20.
Law Vice-President:
Thomas F. McAllister, '21L,
Rolland Winslow, '20L.
Engineering Vice-President:
Clayton S. Shoemaker, '20E,
John Reilly, '20E.
Medic Vice-President:
Harold Makinson, '21M,
Joseph Palma, '20M.
Literary Vice-President:
William W. Hinshaw, '20,
William A. Leitzinger, '20.
Combined Departments Vice-Presi-
dent:
C. J. Clemo, '20D,
M. S. Ballard, '20H.
Faculty Members of Board of Direc-
tors :
Dean Henry M Bates, law,
Prof. John C. Parker, eng .
Prof. Henry C. Adams, lit.
Student Councilman at Large:
Thomas F. McAllster, '21L.
LeGrand Gaines, '21E.
STEPHEN S. ATTWOOD,
On Union Nominations.
COMEDY CLUB CAN
PRESENT ITS PLAY1
With receipt of definite. permission
from the New York firm controlling
producing rights for the staging of
A. E. W. Mason's three act play,
"Green Stockings," on May 22 at the
Whitney theater, members of the Com-
edy club have been forced to make
special arrangements for rehearsal
this week to avoid conflict with the
May festival.
Under the direction of Prof. R. D. T..
Hollister, of the oratorical depart-
ment, the first rehearsal at the Whit-
ney theater was conducted on Saturday
afternoon. With the majority of the
members of the cast already letter
perfect in their lines, there yet re-
mains almost two weeks for the fin-
ishing touches.
Posters for the play are being dis-
tributed about the campus by the
committee in charge of advertising.
Tickets will be placed on sale the lat-
ter part of this week.
PHILOSOPHY TO BE
SUBJECT OF TALK
Dr. Florian Znaniecki, lecturer on
Polish history and institutions at the
University of Chicago, will talk at 4:15
o'clock Tuesday afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium on "Psychological
Current in Modern Philosophy."
During the past few years Dr. Zna-
niecki has published several philo-
sophical books, the best known of
which is "Cultural Reality." Before
the war he lived in Warsaw, Poland,
where he was an authority in his
work.
Upon his arrival in this country, he
was offered the position which he now
holds at the University of Chicago,
and since that time has been actively
engaged in various actjvities.
Dr. Znaniecki will also lecture at
4:15 o'clock Wednesday afternoon in
the Natural Science auditorium, at
which time he will speak on "The Na-
tional Evolution of Poland Since

CHORAL UNION READI
FOR FEST IVAL EVENT
TEMPORARY STAGE ERECTED TO
HOLD LARGE
CHORUS
Prof. A. A. Stanley is conducting the
final rehearsals of the Choral union
at Hill auditorium in readiness for
the May festival ; concerts. Workmen
have finished the erection of the tem-
porary stage which extends over four
rows of the main floor. The surface
of the platform has been raised 18
inches.
Male Voices Limited
Owing to the war conditions, there
are not as many male voices in the
chorus as formerly. The usual size of
the Choral union is 300 voices, but this
year it is about 275. Many men in
the chorua have seen active service in
France.
The Choral union will sing in the
following numbers of the festival:
Thursday evening, Professor Stanley's
Hymnus, "Fair Land of Freedom" and
.Hadley's "Ode to, Music," .Saturday
evening, Gounod's "Faust."
Organized 40 Years Ago
Forty years ago the Choral union
came into existence and for a number

GALSWORTHY SENDS BIG
'Sum FOR RELIEF FUND
PROF. TRUEBLOOD RECEIVES SUB-
SCRIPTIONS FROM
AUTHOR
Prof. T. C. Trueblood is in receipt
of a letter from the Armenian and
Syrian relief committee of New York,
enclosing a communication from John
Galsworthy, who lectured here re-
cently under the'auspices of the Ora-
torical association.
The letter runs as follows:
"Dear Sirs: -
"I have the pleasure of enclosing
you the sum of $4,000, which are the
net profits of my lectures in this coun-
try, after payment of my expenses-
as a contribution to your fund for
Armenian and Syrian relief.
"With good wishes, I am
Very truly yours,
JOHN GALSWORTHY."
Mr. Galsworthy will be remembered
for his lecture delivered here April 16,
on the league of nations.
B1roaden-- Parker

ECONOMIC LIFE or
AUSTRIA ASSUREI
OUTLET TO SEA GiVEN DE
MONARCHY THROUGH
FIUME
ONLY CENTRAL PART
EMPIRE LEFT INTA(
Military Ponce Only, Left In P
of Former Large,
Army
Paris, May 12.-Though the pe
terms for the Austro-Hungarian m
archy are designed to put the I
Kingdom in the class with third
nations, there are some provisions
will restore the economic life of
nation.
In the treaty, which is expected
be made public this week, it is le
ed from an authoritative source
the economic rehabilitation wil
provided for.
Republics Recognized
The chief feature of the treaty
be the definition of boundaries.

of years was a temporary organiza- "A man cannot call himself an en-
tion. Records of the early concerts gineer, unless he at least knows the'
given show that often there were more rudiments of other branches of his'
persons in the chorus than in the profession," said Prof. John C. Parker,
audience. of the electrical engineering depart-
When Professor Stanley accepted inent in his talk, "Electricity in Me-
the call of the University to the chair chanical Engineering," before the
of music about 30 years ago, he or- American Society of Mechanical En-
ganized the Choral union into a per- gineers at their meeting Monday night.
manent body. In 1893 the May festi- Tendency to Narrowness
val was begun and since that time the "Specialization has caused narrow-
Choral union has been an inseparable ness, not only of one vocation but has
part of it. The. personnel of the chor- also caused specialization in branches
us changes from year to year. In many of that vocation to such an 'extent that
cases students remain for the entire a civil engineer does not know suffi-
four years, but usually they do not cient mechanical engineering to make
enter until their junior and senior him above par in his work."
years. Embraces All Divisions
An approximate estimate of the en- "To be good in his work, an engi-
tire number of singers who have tak- neer must know something of all di-
en part in the chorus during the 40 visions of his profession and also of
years of its existence is 6,000. cultural subjects in no way connect-
ed with it. He must know a little of
ITALIANS OMITTED civil engineering, chemical engineer-
ing, electrical engineering, and such
FROM AGREEMENT things as music, art, history, and lit-
erature to make ,him excel not only
Paris, May 12.-Much comment has in his vocation but in public life."
arisen over the fact that Italy is not Professor Parker also showed the
included in the proposed engagement connection between electrical engi-
between the United States, Great Brit- neering and mechanical engineering.
ain, and France for mutual action Following his talk A. D. ' Althouse,
against Germany should Germany '19E, P. W. Steelsmith, '19E, and R.
again become aggressive toward C. Voorhees, '19E, read a paper, "Car
France. It is said that Premier Or- Performance," containing the results
Lando was ready to bring Italy into of their experiments in mechanical en-
the agreement and that he took part gineering 33. f
in some of the early discussions al- Dean Cooley Speaks
though the plans were consummated Although Dean Mortimer E. Cooley
about the time of the high tension was not on the program, he spoke as
which removed Premier Orlando from president of the national society on
active participation in the council of the work of the local organization.
four. The following officers were. elected
Because of Italy's membership in the for the next semester: chairman, J. E.
former Triple Alliance it is held in Goodwillie, '20E, ;vice-chairman, C.
some quarters to be a serious omis- R. Nyman, '20E, secretary, N. W. Hob-
sion not to include Italy in the new son, '20E, treasurer, T. P. Russel,
Franco-American British engagement. '20E. The committee on drawing ta-
- bles and chairs gave their report
STORIES FOR STYLUS CONTEST which advocated lower and standard
MUST BE HANDED IN BY MAY 15 tables and chairs. This was adopted
by the society and sent to Prof. H. C.
Anderson for consideration.
Short stories which are to be sub- Marking Reforms Advocated
mitted in the annual Stylus short story The committee to investigate grades
contest must be in the hands of Agnes also advocated a uniform standard of
True, '19, or the librarian of the rhet- marking. The report will be sent to
oric library on or before May 15. Dean Cooley -and later to the faculty
Ten dollars will be awarded to the for adoption.
writer of the best story. The stories D. M. Ferris, '19E, retiring chair-
are not restricted as to length or sub- ! man, was presented with a fob by the
ject matter. Anyone attending the members of the A. S. M. E. as an ap--
University, not a member of Stylus, preciation for his services during the
may comuet~e for the prize. " E semester.

this the independence of Hungary 1w
be established, and the republics
Czecho-Slovakia and Jugo-Slavia w
be officially recognized. That part
Austria now known as German A
tria will be made independent.I
this point the council of the Leag
of Nations was especially insist
and it was the first specification in I
treaty given Germany.
The first part of the treaty will
the League of Nations; the second t
points to be taken up in 'the pe
te'rm The'most impo'ta tt'
terms have been announced as the f
lowing:
Treaty Terms
Austria and. Hungary will be gli
an outlet to the sea, no matter wi
the outcome of the Fiume dispute
The new Austria will be that p
which is now known as German A1
tria, the Tyrol Region will go to Ita
Banat and Temasvar go to Jugo-S
via, and Rumania will be awarded
large part of Transylvania. The)
outlet will be in the form of rights
use the port and docks of Flume.
The armies of the two nations a
be reduced to mere military poll
and maintained by a volunteer syst
only. No munitions of war, inclu
ing all seige guns, will be allowed
be retained. All of the Hungarian f
tifications on the Rumanian bori
will be reduced. To handle indem
ties a permanent financial commit
will be established, as in the Gen
treaties. The committee will coll
the payments from the remaining pa
of the monarchy, and the amou
from the rest will be apportioned
cording to the ability of those pa
to respond.
River Rghts
A special commission will ti
charge of the use of the Danube. T
commission will be under the dir
tion of the League of Nations.
The economic stipulations are
same as those of the German tre
but a great deal easier, because of
breakup of the parts of the couni
The former parts of the empire V
be required to aid in the payment
the war debt, taking into considerat
the means of the different parts.
SPRING GAMES NOTICE
Every freshman on the campus
is reminded by the Student coun-
cilmen in charge of the Spring
games that '22 men will be
weighed in for the tug-of-war
from 10 to 12 o'clock Wednes-
day morning and from 2 to 4
o'clock the same afternoon in
Waterman gymnasium. Sophr
omores will be weighed in for
the same event at the same hours
Thursday.
The pep meetings for the un-
derclasses will be held at 7
o'clock on the same days tUat
the classes weigh in, in the
West Physics lecture room.

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