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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 11, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

la.d lrlit/

L~ ava 1 LIMN L~tALd I

......

CIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
IIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ed every morning except Monday
ie university year by the Board in
d Student Publications.
R OF TJHC ASSOCIATLD PRESS
sociated Press is exclusively entitled
e for reoublication of all news dis-
reditedtoi at or not otherwise credited
aper and also the local news pub-
ein.
3 at the postoffice at, Ann Arbor,
, as second class matter.
ptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Ann Arbor Press Building.
Business, 96mo; ldirorial. 2414.
nications not to exceed 30S words,{
,the signature not necessarily to ap-
rint, but as an evidence of faitb, and
f events will be published in Thel
the discretion of the Editor, if left
iled to the office.
ed communications will receive no,
ion. No manuscript will be se-
less the writer incloses postage.
aily does not necessarily endorse the
s expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Roeser Managing Editor

.9

FIRST
CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
10:30 A. M. Public Worship;
Sermon by Lloyd C. Douglas
Topic,
"Demobilizing Mother"
6:30 P. M.
Student Round Table
Speaker, Prof.'John R.
Brumm
Subject, "Looking Inward"

SOPH LITERARY CLASS DUES'
TO BE COLLECTED TUESDAY
Dues of sophomore lits will be col-
lected next Tuesday, May 13, in Uni-
versity hall. Payment should be made
to the class treasurer, Albert Jacobs.
Since the class tax of 25 cents must

be paid eventually, it is urged that all
payments be made next Tuesday to fa-
cilitate matters.
Typewriters and office supplies; ren-
tals and repairs. G. E. Washington,
89 Ann Arbor Savings Bank Build-
ing.-Adv.

Michigan

4a

Michigan Favorite College Song Book .$3.00
Michia n "M" Book, Loose Leaf, Largo Size . .200
Mighigan "M" Book, Loose Leaf, Small Size . $1.50
Michigan Memory Book, Black Cloth Cover, loose leaf with "M
orseal in gold . . . . . . . $3.00

R

I

i

FIRST

"21ie

'I-

Michigan Souvenir Photos of Buildings and G rounds I I

500

EMINENT 'CONDUCTORS TO
LEAD' CHICAGO ORCHESTRA

arey.............News
. . .... City
.... ...Associate
McAllister..... ..Feature
l b e rt..........Telegraph
ndis................port
~lark...........Women's
Msey .. .. ..Women's

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

r
r
r

.nkman.......... Dramatic
..usic
... .... Lchage
hl......... .....Literary

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

ISSUE EDITORS
t R. Slusser Paul G. Weber
Sherwood Edgar L. Rice
W.- Hitchcock J. P. Hart
William Clarkson

REPOR'TERS
uns John E. McMagis
shall C. H. Murchison
Mary D. Lane
merhoran John] 1. Dakin
wn Logan Trumbull
wart Stewart Baxter
Muriel 4. Bauman

:berm
Bro
ier

BUSINESS STAFF
cinson . ....Business Manager

bele.. .Asst. Business
Gaines-. Asst. Business1
Fevre....Asst. Business
tzinger...Asst. BusinessI
Major... .Asst. Business
Schoffner. .Asst. Business

Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager

Under the leadership of two em-
inent conductors, Theodore Thomas,
and Frederick Stock,, the Chicago
Symphony orchestra, which has play-
ed at Ann Arbor May festivals for the
past 14 years, has grown froa\ a small
struggling organization to the. pres-
ent orchestra of 90 players.
The orchestra was organized in -1864
when it began a series of concerts in
New York. In 1891 a number of pub-
lic-spirited men brought the orches-
tra to Chicago, where for the past
4 years concerts have been given
weekly throughout the musical season
of 28 weeks. From eight to 12 weeks
are spent each year on tour.
Start Fund for Hall
A public subscription was started in
1902 for the collection of funds for the
erection of a music hall in Chicago
as an endowment and permanent home
for the orchestra. Two weeks after
the hall was opened to the public
Theodore Thomas died and his as-
sistant, Frederick Stock, succeeded
him as conductor. Mr. Stock was born
in Julich, Germany, in 1872, the son
of a bandmaster. Under him he be-
gan his musical studies, entered the
Cologne conservatory at 14 years of
age, was graduated as a -violinist and
then took up seriously the study of
theory and harmony under Engelbert
Humperdinck, Heinrich Zollner, Gus-
tav Jensen, and Franz Wollner.
Has Written Msic
Mr. Stock has written a considerable
number of works of the larger forms
-overtures, symphonic poems and sets
of symphonic variations.'One of his
compositions, "March and Mymn to
Democracy," will be played in the first
Festival concert Wednesday evening.
Professor ates
Wireless Theory

METHODIST CHURCH
Mother's Day
10:30 o'clock
Sermon by Dr. Stalker
"MOTHER 0' MINE"
Noon
Prof. A. E~. Wood
Young Men's Class
6.30 o'clock
The Wesleyan Guild
Leader, W. L. Casler, '22M
Subject:
"Doing Business on Borrowed
Capital"
7:30 o'clock
Address by Dr. Stalker
"BROWNING ON SOUL-
GROWTH"
Methodist Students and Friends
Welcome.

Co lleg e
Gossip"

is going to have several summer
frocks made next week, so she went
down town yesterday to select the
materials.
First of all she wanted some good
looking gingham. She finally selected
a wonderfully attractive grey and yel-
low plaid, because it was so unusual
and "different" looking. She could
just see it with grey linen collars and
cuffs touched up with a bit of wool

Comfort - - Freedom
Now's the time to change

Athletic Underwear

I

embroidery.

W11son Bros., Lewis, B. V. D.

Wadhams & Co.

SENIOR STAFF
)VCll Edward lPrichs, Jr.
dc~ean Henry Whiting II.
Cadwell J. Duae Miller
\ewtun R. A. Sullivan
JUiIOR STAFF
neid-er Isahelle FarnuM
indsay Geo. R. Striumabeck, Jr.
orc Arthur L. Glazier
ames A. Kennedy, 7r.
VDAY, MAY 11, 1919.
TMOTHER
the day which a whole na-
verently devoting to Moth-
others who have gone be-
have left their imperishable
Sthe mothers who are still
give us their help and con-

First Baptist
Church
10:30 A. X.
Public Worship
Sermon by
J. M. WELLS
THE GLORY OF A MOTHER
12:00 P. M.
Guild Class
conducted by F. B. Igler
6:30 P. X.
Young people will meet at churc*
*nd go to Beefsteak Hill for out-
door service.
St. Paul
Lutheran Church
Corner Third and West Huron
10:00 A.M. German Service.
Introductory Sermon by the
New Pastor.
Rev. C. A. Brauer
7:00 P.M. English Service.
Topic: "What Must I do to be
Saved"
Thursday Eve: Social Gathering
in Chuch Parlors.

/{,/s:1
.\j~

fichigan Fanners, Pennants, Pillows, Jewelry, etc.
in great baniety
UNIVERSITY
R S BOOK STORE

,,"

fl

STATE STREET STORE

There were some lovely soft colored
chambrays in tints of green, rose, and
blue that appealed to her immensely,
but she decided that she really didn't
need another dress of this type so she
started to look for-material for a fluffy

To University Students,
School- Children,
and the General Public
Bicycle riding anywhere upon the Campus except
in regular driveways has been forbidden by the Board
of Regents, in accordance with Public Act. No. 80 of
1905 as amended by Public Act No. 302 of 1907.
Violators are subject to prosecution under the terms of
these Acts. The Buildings and Grounds Department
has been instructed by the Regents to enforce this
legislation. These regulations are entirely separate
and distinct from the City ordinance relative to riding
bicycles upon sidewalks.
E. C. PARDON,
Superintendent Buildings and Grounds.

Day is a sad one this year.
as taken from many mothers
t precious possessions, and
arts follow in the wake of
f Mars. To those- mothers
is have gone down on the'
>ry, no honor is too great,
ve fought their battles, just
ins have done. The hardest
say at home and wonder-
hether the boy will come
ther he will once more
iat word most sacred of all,
or whether he will never
the - heart that yearns for

frock.

nothers who hptve lost their
re the hardest fight of all. To
should offer all that a grate-
try and a thankful people can
it it will be a sorry substitute
reasurers that have gone.
mothers that have been spar-
honor is too great. At their
.y are the love and veneration,
man and woman and child.
+r we are, whatever we hope to
we owe it all to Mother.
has been especially set aside
of Mother. But every day of
is a tribute.
NAMES
are the first things we get
s come into the world. Every-
o one. Considering this, it is
how we make the greatest
tbout them.
ink our own name the best
been devised since the system
ng was started - yet the
are that there have been
s with exactly the same title.
st time our names appears in
tn occasion long to be remem-
Ve look and gaze in raptures.
it is as guests at a banquet,
-secretary of some minor com-
s members of a club, or even
inal it causes a peculiar
hich can never again, be du-

Commenting on the debate. several
London papers are having on the sub-
ject of whether we can wireless to
the stars, Porter H. Evans, instruct-
or of electrical engineering and in
charge of the University radio sta-
tion said, "The argument is like the
one, 'Can a yard stick have one end'."
Marconi Quoted
The London press is quoting many
prominent radio authorities on the
question, including Marconi, who be-
lieves that "we could reach the nearer
stars and certainly the moon by this
means of communication.
Mr. Evans has an argument which
has not been put forth by the sci-
entists in the discussion overseas and.
one which sounds much more feasible
to the layman.
"We know that the ether outside of
the earth's atmosphere is highly con-
ductive to wireless waves," Mr. Evans
said, "and it can be shown in the lab-
oratory that radio signals cannot be
sent through a conductor. It acts like
a mirror and they are reflected. It
is therefore obvious that any radio
signals sent rom the earth could not
pass beyond the earth's atmosphere."
Strange Signals Noted
Several efforts at inter-planet com-
munication have been made, but have
proved unsuccessful. Several times
since the development of the wireless,
unaccounted for signals have been
picked up. These signals are said by
a few authorities to have come from
some planet trying to communicate'
with the earth.
It is further said that even though
we should be put on speaking terms
with the stars, conversation with them
would be a tiresome job as the near-
est is so far distant that it would
take four and a half years to span the
gulf.

f- -
Whi
Trousers
With easy breezy-lines
for m e n who demand
class atmosphere t h a t
good trousers create.
H a n d workmanship
from the belt to the cuffs
insures a proper fit.
Profit by an early selec-
tion.
Wagner & Co.
State St.--at head of Liberty
Established 1842

.Ct
B'
IM
"t
v

SEE The NEW PIPES
At The
City-Cigar Store
110 E. Huron St.

Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping

She bought pink organdie for this
and yards and yards of narrow or-
gandie pleating to trim it with.

Use Wahl

Tempoint
FOUNTAIN PENS

Then she saw tIe new dark colored
voiles in the indistinct patterns which'
make them scarcely distinguishable!
from printed Georgette. She chose
one in shades of blue and purple, al-
though she almost got a uniquely de-
signed pattern worked out in blackI

AND

Eversharp
Perfect Point Pencils

$1.00 to $4.00

Hamilton Business
CollegeI
State and William Sts.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, ,Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Marh 3o, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-- :ro a.
m., and hourly to 8:ro p. m.'
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7 :48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. M. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. M., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to g:os p. m., ro:50
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, x1:45 p. In., 1:2o
a m. i :io a. m., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
*:0 p. M.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620g

H. 1. SWITZER &Ca,

and white.

310 South State Street

LOlkN STILL HAS DEFICIT OF
$1,200,000,000; ONE DAY LEFT

eatest ambition is to see our,
e in history for some great
e by s, though whether it is
ake. o" the deed or just to see
before the world is a matter
e. 1
here are the "pet" names-the
r mother has or us, or our
our school-mates, or, b -,ge
ames we remember best long
r have gohe out of use.
11, a name is the best thing
life. We have it at the very
3 it is uip to us to make it
nething-either big or little.
a we quit this life, it is trio
V we IeAVA um"in

She didn't know quite how she
wanted this dress made, so guess what
she did! She went upstairs to the
second floor fashion salons and asked
to look at their voile and Georgette
dresses. They showed her so many,
and the styles were so clever, that she
not only got a host of ideas for her-
self, but any number to take back to

THE RAINY
SEASON IS HERE
00 WITH
2700OU

Washingtnn, May 9.-Nearly $1,200,
600,000 remains to be subscribed to
the Victory Liberty loan in the single
remaining day of the campaign. Sales
tabulated today by the treasury show-
ed $3,314,870,000 already subscribed,
or 7' .6 per cent of the total requir-
ed. The St. Louis district is the only
d trict which has subscribed its
quca.
Science has proved that newspaper
advertising pays best. You can reach
all the stadents and , facuity through
The. Daily.-Adv.

314 s. State St.

Ann Arbor

Call Us

her room mate?

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann'Arbor Savings Dank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $50,000.00
Resources ......... $4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

A Trial Solicited
INDEPENDENT

40000/0"4 11640

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